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Tuesday, 26 April 2016

Most Common Disease of 50+: The Clinical trials and Studies of Musculo-Skeletal disorders(MSDs)- Gout - The Do’s and Do not’s list

Kyle J. Norton (Scholar and Master of Nutrients, all right reserved)Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it's news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada - Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are medical condition mostly caused by work related occupations and working environment, affecting patients’ muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments and nerves and developing over time. According to a community sample of 73 females and 32 males aged 85 and over underwent a standardised examination at home, musculoskeletal pain was reported by 57% of those interviewed(*).

Types of Musculo-Skeletal disorders in elder

1. Osteoarthritis
2. Gout
3. Rheumatoid Arthritis
4. Polymalagia Arthritis
5. Cervical myleopathy and spinal canal stenosis
6. Osteoporosis
7. Low back pain
8. Fibromyalgia

                                          Gout

Gout mostly effected one joint is an acute and recurrent condition of arthritis as a result of uric acid building up in blood, inducing joint inflammation.

                   The Prevention and Management


The Do’s and Do not’s list
1. Coffee
Researchers found that long-term moderate coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of incident gout, particular in women(139). According to the joint study led by the Naresuan University Hospital, there is an associations between vitamin C, alcohol,coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and the risk of gout(140).
In Japanese men and women aged 49-76 years, "There were inverse associations of coffee consumption with serum UA concentrations and hyperuricemia in men regardless of adjustment for covariates" Said by Dr. Pham NM and colleagues at the Kyushu University(141).

2. Maintaining adequate fluid intake, particular at night
Dehydrate is associated with the increased risk of gout, particular at night time, epidemiological study suggested(142). Drinking water or skim milk can improve gout control, according to findings from two studies that highlight the important contribution of lifestyle factors on gout prevention and management(144), and recent use of diuretics is associated with a significantly increased risk for recurrent gouty arthritis(143).

3. Weight reduction
Obesity cause cause pressure to the joint. Obesity is not only a risk factor for incident gout but is associated with an earlier age at gout onset(147). According to the a total of 543 cases of juvenile gout from the Ho-Ping Gout Database and 5269 gouty cases with onset age of 40 to 50 years, family history of overweight and hereditary background are significantly associated to increased risk of juvenile gout(145).
Dr. Lee J and the research team at the The Catholic University of Korea, said," Gout is a chronic inflammatory disease the development of which is associated with obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities."(146).
In deed, women with early- and mid-adult life obesity, high mid-adult life waist-to-hip ratios, and adulthood high weight gain, experience a greater incidence of gout, according to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine(148).

4. Dietary and life style pattern changes
a. Reduce alcohol
Alcohol intake is strongly associated with an increased risk of gout. This risk varies substantially according to type of alcoholic beverage: beer confers a larger risk than spirits, whereas moderate wine drinking does not increase the risk(150). The association between excessive alcohol consumption and risk of gout has been suspected since ancient times which was confirmed by the study by the Harvard Medical School, Boston(149).
Unfortunate to alcohol drinker, regardless of type of alcoholic beverage, episodic alcohol consumption,was associated with an increased risk of recurrent gout attacks, including potentially with moderate amounts(151).

b. Reduce intake of foods with high levels of purine, such as sardines, herring, kidney and sweetbreads, shrimp, etc.(152). According to the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, in the review of the data from 14,809 participants (6,932 men and 7,877 women) ages 20 years and older for the years 1988-1994, higher levels of meat and seafood consumption are associated with higher serum levels of uric acid(153) and sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption is associated with serum uric acid levels and frequency of hyperuricemia(154).

c. Diet with foods to prevent gout
Dairy products, vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruits (less sugary ones), and whole grains are healthy choices for the comorbidities of gout and may also help prevent gout by reducing insulin resistance(156). Coffee and vitamin C(155) supplementation could be considered as preventive measures as these can lower urate levels, as well as the risk of gout and some of its comorbidities(156).
Diet with foods such as cherries and strawberries to prevent gout(157), as  evidence of the impact of strawberry intake on gout has been report(157).

5. Reduce intake of medications which can cause gout and recurrent gout by reviewing them with your doctor, as certain medicine such as Thiazide and loop diuretics(158).

6. Exercise
Regular physical exercise is associated to reduce risk of gout(159).
“Exercises to relieve gout should be done steady and cautiously as to avoid further irritation to the joints. The best exercises for gout are range of motion types: strength training, stretching and building endurance. Yoga is an exercise that incorporates all four; however, there are other exercises that can be done individually also” According to the article of How to Exercise If You Have Gout(160).

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References
(139) Coffee consumption and risk of incident gout in women: the Nurses' Health Study by Choi HK1, Curhan G.(PubMed)
(140) The association of vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and gout by Towiwat P1, Li ZG2.(PubMed)
(141) The relation of coffee consumption to serum uric Acid in Japanese men and women aged 49-76 years by Pham NM1, Yoshida D, Morita M, Yin G, Toyomura K, Ohnaka K, Takayanagi R, Kono S.(PubMed)
(142) Nocturnal Risk of Gout Attacks by Hyon K. Choi, MD, DrPH,1 Jingbo Niu, MD, DSc,1 Tuhina Neogi, MD, PhD, FRCPC,1 Clara A. Chen, MHS,1 Christine Chaisson, MPH,1 David Hunter, MBBS, PhD,2 and Yuqing Zhang, DSc1(PMC)
(143) Recent diuretic use and the risk of recurrent gout attacks: the online case-crossover gout study by Hunter DJ1, York M, Chaisson CE, Woods R, Niu J, Zhang Y.(PubMed)
(144) Water, Skim Milk Consumption May Improve Gout Control By: AMY ROTHMAN SCHONFELD JANUARY 1, 2010,(Eheumatology News)
(145) Juvenile gout in Taiwan associated with family history and overweight by Chen SY1, Shen ML.(PubMed)
(146) Visceral fat obesity is highly associated with primary gout in a metabolically obese but normal weighted population: a case control study by Lee J1, Lee JY2, Lee JH3, Jung SM4, Suh YS5, Koh JH6, Kwok SK7, Ju JH8, Park KS9, Park SH10.(PubMed)
(147) Obesity and younger age at gout onset in a community-based cohort by DeMarco MA1, Maynard JW, Huizinga MM, Baer AN, Köttgen A, Gelber AC, Coresh J.(PubMed)
(148) Incident gout in women and association with obesity in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study by Maynard JW1, McAdams DeMarco MA, Baer AN, Köttgen A, Folsom AR, Coresh J, Gelber AC.(PubMed)
(149) Alcohol intake and risk of incident gout in men: a prospective study by Choi HK1, Atkinson K, Karlson EW, Willett W, Curhan G.(PubMed)
(150) Alcohol intake and risk of incident gout in men: a prospective study by Choi HK1, Atkinson K, Karlson EW, Willett W, Curhan G.(PubMed)
(151) Alcohol quantity and type on risk of recurrent gout attacks: an internet-based case-crossover study by Neogi T1, Chen C2, Niu J3, Chaisson C2, Hunter DJ4, Zhang Y3.(PubMed)
(152) Purine-rich foods, dairy and protein intake, and the risk of gout in men by Choi HK1, Atkinson K, Karlson EW, Willett W, Curhan G.(PubMed)
(153) Intake of purine-rich foods, protein, and dairy products and relationship to serum levels of uric acid: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by Choi HK1, Liu S, Curhan G.(PubMed)
(154) Sugar-sweetened soft drinks, diet soft drinks, and serum uric acid level: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by Choi JW1, Ford ES, Gao X, Choi HK.(PubMed)
(155) A prescription for lifestyle change in patients with hyperuricemia and gout by Choi HK1.(PubMed)
(156) A prescription for lifestyle change in patients with hyperuricemia and gout by Choi HK1.(PubMed)
(157) Impact of strawberries on human health: insight into marginally discussed bioactive compounds for the Mediterranean diet by Tulipani S1, Mezzetti B, Battino M.(PubMed)
(158) Use of diuretics and risk of incident gout: a population-based case-control study by Bruderer S1, Bodmer M, Jick SS, Meier CR.(PubMed)
(158) Recent diuretic use and the risk of recurrent gout attacks: the online case-crossover gout study. by Hunter DJ1, York M, Chaisson CE, Woods R, Niu J, Zhang Y.(PubMed)
(159) Effects of diet, physical activity and performance, and body weight on incident gout in ostensibly healthy, vigorously active men by Paul T Williams(PubMed)
(160) How to Exercise If You Have Gout by Sequoia