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Friday, 27 November 2015

The Holistic Prevention, management and Treatment of Dementia (Most Common Diseases of Elder: Diseases of Central Nervous system(CNS)) Through Research, Clinical Trials and Studies of conventional medicine



Kyle J. Norton (Scholar)

Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it's news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada - Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.
Abstract
Dementia is defined as neuro degeneration syndrome among elder, affecting memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language, and judgement over 47 millions
of worldwide population, mostly in the West. The evaluation of the syndrome by holistic medicine has been lacking, especially through conventional medicine research and studies. The aim of this essay is to provide accurate information of how effective of holistic medicine in prevention, management and treatment of dementia through searching data base of PubMed.
This is the third time, a research paper has been written this way to general public that you will not find any where in the net. We would like to provide more of this kind of research, but unfortunately, it is time consuming and burdened financially, we have run out of time and the site will be shut down Monday(July 6, 2015). If you like what you read, please donate generously to our site.
at http://kylejnorton.blogspot.ca/
Kyle J. Norton


Contents

Most common diseases of elders - Nutrients Requirements for elder
I. The Types
II. Causes
1. The Deficient Causes of Dementia
2. Free radical causes of dementia (Alzheimer’s disease)
3. Free radical causes of Parkinson's disease
4. Free radical causes of dementia (Parkinson's disease, PD)
5. Free radical causes of dementia (Multiple Sclerosis, MS)
6. Free radical causes of dementia (Lou Gehrig's disease(Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis))
7. Diseases causes of dementia
8. Hormonal Causes of Dementia
9. Substance Abused Causes of Dementia
10. Diet Causes of Dementia
11. Medication Causes of Dementia
12. Life Style Causes of Dementia
13. Genetic mutation Causes of Dementia

III. The Diseases's symptoms and Complications
14. Symptoms of Dementia
15. Complications of Dementia

III. The preventions and managements
16. The Preventive Do's and Do Not's list
17. The Preventive Antioxidant enzymes
18. The Preventive Metals Binding Proteins
19. The Preventive Common Free Radical Scavengers
20. The Preventive Phytochemical Rosemarinol
21. The Preventive Phytochemicals Gingerole and Naringenin
22. The Preventive Phytochemicals Tangeritin and Curcumin
23. The Preventive Phytochemicals Gallic acid and Cinnamic acid
24. The Preventive Phytochemicals Tyrosol and Silymarin

IV. Treatments
A. In conventional Medicine
25. Treatments of Alzheimer's disease and Diminished quality of acetylcholine
26. Treatments of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome due to long-term alcohol abuse
27. Treatments of Dementia associated with Parkinson's disease
28. Treatments of Dementia associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)
29. Treatments of Dementia associated with Multi-infarct dementia
30. Treatments of Dementia associated with Subdural hematoma

B. In Herbal Medicine
31. Herbal Treatments: Ginkgo Biloba(bai Guo)
32. Herbal Treatments: Lemon Balm
33. Herbal Treatments: Lavender
34. Herbal Treatments: Huperzine A.
35. Herbal Treatments: Bacopa
36. Herbal Treatments: Other Potential Herbs

C. In Traditional Chinese Medicine
The herbs
38. Treatments in Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine Poria cocos(Fu Ling)
39. Treatments in Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine Radix polygalae(Yuan Zhi)
40. Treatments in Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine: Radix glycyrrhizae(Gan Cao)
41.Treatments in Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine: Radix Angelica Sinensis(Dang Qui)
42. Treatments in Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine: Radix rehmanniae(Di Huang)

Dementia caused by Kidney Qi deficiency
43. TCM Herbal treatments of Dementia Caused by Kidney Qi Deficiency
Dementia caused by Heart Qi deficiency
44. TCM Dan shen treatments of Dementia Caused by Heart Qi Deficiency
45. TCM Ren shen (Ginseng) treatments of Dementia Caused by Heart Qi Deficiency
46. TCM XI Yang Shen (American Ginseng) treatments of Dementia Caused by Heart Qi Deficiency
47. TCM Sang Shen (Mulberry Fruit) treatments of Dementia Caused by Heart Qi Deficiency

Dementia Caused by Spleen Qi Deficiency
48. TCM Herbal Peony (Chi Shao) treatments of Dementia Caused by Spleen Qi Deficienc
49. TCM Herbal Chai Hu (Bupleurum) in treatments of Dementia Caused by Spleen Qi Deficiency
50. TCM Herbal Safflower (Hong Hua) treatments of Dementia Caused by Spleen Qi Deficiency
51. TCM Herbal Cinnamonin treatments of Dementia Caused by Spleen Qi Deficiency

Dementia caused by Blood Stasis
52. TCM Herbal Gou Qi treatments of Dementia Caused by Blood Stasis
53. TCM Herbal Polygonum multiflorum (He shou wu) treatments of Dementia Caused by Blood Stasis

Dementia Caused by Toxins accumulation
54. TCM herbal Shui Fei Zi (Milk thistle) treatments of Dementia Caused by Toxin Accumulation
55. TCM herbal Xiu Hui Xiang (Fennel) treatments of Dementia Caused by Toxin Accumulation
56. TCM herbal Da Suan (Garlic) treatments of Dementia Caused by Toxin Accumulation

Dementia due to aging Kidney essence gradual depletion
57. TCM herbal Dong Chong Cao(Cordyceps) treatments of Dementia Caused by Kidney Jing Depletion
58. TCM herbal Shi Hu(Dendrobium) treatments of Dementia Caused by Kidney Jing Depletion
59. TCM herbal Du Zhong(Eucommia bark) treatments of Dementia Caused by Kidney Jing Depletion
60. TCM herbal Huang Qi(Astragalus) treatments of Dementia Caused by Kidney Jing Depletion



                              Nutrients Requirements for elder


Consuming foods and drinks, containing protein and a specific range of vitamins, minerals and trace elements are necessary to provide sources of energy (calories). Especially plant food phytochemicals with various groups of structure include 3000-4000 individual compounds with possession of a number of different properties(175)


Daily intakes for micro nutrients recommended by the Department of Health DRVs (Dietary Reference Values)(176)
A. Nutrient and Recommended daily intake
1. Calcium (mg) 700
2. Phosphorus (mg) 550
3. Magnesium (mg) 270
4. Sodium (mg) 1600
5. Potassium (mg) 3500
6. Chloride (mg) 2500
7. Iron (mg) 14.8
8. Zinc (mg) 9
9. Copper (mg) 1.2
10. Selenium (μg) 60
11. Iodine (μg) 140
12. Vitamin A (μg) 600
13. Thiamin (mg) 0.8
14. Riboflavin (mg) 1.1
15. Niacin (mg) 12
16. Vitamin B6 (mg) 1.2
17. Vitamin B12 (μg) 1.5
18. Folate (μg) 200
19. Vitamin C (mg) 40
20. Vitamin D* (μg) 10

B. Estimated Average Requirements (EARs) for energy
Age (years), Estimated energy requirement for males (kcals per day), Estimated energy requirement for females (kcals per day)
51-59 2550 1900
60-64 2380 1900
65-74 2330 1900
75+ 2100 1810

C. Proteins
Age (years) Estimated protein requirement for males (kcals per day) For females
51+ 53.3 46.5

Types of dementia

1. Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is a brain disorder named for German physician Alois Alzheimer(1). Alzheimer's destroys brain cells, causing problems with memory, thinking and behavior severe enough to affect language communication, memory, lifelong hobbies or social life. Alzheimer's gets worse over time, and it is fatal(2). Over 1 million people in US alone are currently afflicted by Alzheimer's disease because of degeneration of hippocampus and cerebral cortex(3) of the brain where memory, language and cognition(4) are located. With this mental disorder, brain cells gradually die and generate fewer and fewer chemical signals day by day resulting in diminished of functions. Overtime memory thinking as well as behavior deteriorates. Today, there is no known cure.

2. Absence of acetylcholine

If the nerves located in front of the brain perish(5), caused by diminished quality of acetylcholine due long term alcohol abused may result of cognitive dysfunction(6) causes of language difficulty, memory loss, concentration problem, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors(8),reduced moblile skills because of lacking reaction in muscular activity and refection(7).

3. Dementia due to long-term alcohol abuse
Dementia is common in patients with alcoholism(9). Most classic is the Korsakoff's dementia resulted in extremely poor short term memory(10) and often associated with the memory losses of confabulations due to diminished processing resources and/or an encoding or retrieval deficit(11).

4. Multi-infarct dementia
Also known as vascular dementia, is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease in older adults caused by different mechanisms all results in vascular lesions(12) of the brain(13).

5. Dementia associated with Parkinson's disease
Parkinson disease (PD) is a disabling, progressive condition, causes of cognitive deficits due to the interruption of frontal-subcortical loops that facilitate cognition and parallel the motor loop(15)(16) due to loss of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) dopamine (DA) neurons(14).

6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)
People who have eaten contaminated beef(18) for many years may be infected without even knowing it. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a quickly progressing and fatal disease consisted of dementia(19), muscle abnormal functions(17).

7. Subdural hematoma
It is the accumulation of blood beneath the outer cover of the brain resulted from the rupture of blood vessel(20)(21). Subdural hemorrhages may increase intracranial pressure(22), causing compression and damage to delicate brain tissue. Acute subdural hematoma has a high mortality rate(23).

Other types of dementia include metabolic disorders, dementia due to long-term substance abuse, hypothyroidism, and hyperethyroidism.


Causes of dementia

A. Deficient cause of dementia due to aging
1. Vitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) deficiency
Vitamin D levels not only plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many age-associated diseases including cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes
mellitus and stroke, but also associate with increased risk of prevalent cognitive dysfunction. According to number of studies, raising vitamin D plays a role in decreased cognitive dysfunction and dementia(24). Evidence from epidemiological also insisted the association between 25(OH)D concentrations and systolic blood pressure, risk for CV disease-related deaths, symptoms of depression, cognitive deficits, and mortality(25).

2. Folic acid with vitamin B12 deficiency
Folates are vitamins essential to the development of the central nervous system. Deficiency of folate can increase the risk of dementia. According to Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group, folic acid plus vitamin B12 were effctive in reducing the serum homocysteine concentrations, with no adverse effects(26).

3. Vitamin B12 deficiency
An association between neuropsychiatric disorders and vitamin B12deficiency has been recognized since 1849. Deficiency of Vitamin B12 are found in many elders and might contribute to age-associated cognitive impairment, according to the Scientist at Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group(27).

4. Vitamin B6 deficiency
Vitamin B6 supplementation showed to reduce the risk of developing cognitive impairment in older healthy people, and improve cognitive functioning of people with cognitive decline and dementia, according the study conducted by Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group(28).

5. Deficiency of Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1and growth hormones
Deficiency of Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)--1 hormone may contribute to the genesis of cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly patients. Old age, in the absence of circulating IGF-1, a hormone with a complex role in brain function has seen to link to an acceleration of neurological diseases(29) Growth hormone and IGF-1 replacement showed to increase neurogenesis, vascular density, and glucose utilization, and alter NMDA receptor subunit composition in brain areas implicated learning and memory, in animal (30)and children(31) studies.

8. Deficiency of cerebrospinal fluid melatonin
Melatonin plays an essential role in ventricular system via choroid plexus portals. In Alzheimer's disease, inadequate melatonin increases risk of the neuropathological changes due to hydroxyl radicals cause of damage mitochondria and initiated cascade of oxygen radicals(32).

9. Decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations
DHEA, a neurosteroid secreted by the adrenal cortex. is also a neurosteroid. The levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrationsare decline in concentration with age(33).

10. Etc.

B. Free radical causes of dementia
B.1. Alzheimer’s disease
1. Free radical and Alzheimer’s disease
Free radicals causes of Alzheimer’s disease is well defined in many researches(25)(26). Oxidative stress-induced injury involved the selective modification of different intracellular proteins may lead to the neurofibrillary degeneration of neurons in the brain(27)(28).

2. Antioxidants and Alzheimer’s disease
a. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)
Change of brain aging in DHA metabolism, was found in patients withAlzheimer's disease(29). DHA, a naturally occurring component found in every cell membrane(29) with ability to increase phosphatidylserine(30)(31) is important in decreased production of proinflammatory omega-6 eicosanoids causes of Alzheimer's disease(31) and in improved the memory of animals with Alzheimer's disease by suppressing oxidative damage in the brain(32).

b. Vitamin E
Vitamin E, and drugs(memantine) reduced generalized inflammation, may slow the decline of mental and physical abilities in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over the long term(33). Also vitamin E inhibited cells damage and cells death caused by beta-amyloid(34)(35), which is toxic to brain cells(36).

c. Phosphatidylserine
Patients who had Alzheimer’s disease taken100 milligrams per day (mg/day) of phosphatidylserine scored significantly better on standardized memory tests at the end of the 12-week trial period than patients without(37)(38).

d. Antioxidants
Antioxidant are found at much lower levels for patients with Alzheimer’s disease(39)(40)(41), such as serum of vitamin A, C, E, zinc and transfferin.

e. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors
Alzheimer’s disease patients showed to exhibit the significant loss of muscarinic cholinergic receptors neurons(42) causes of reduced volume of neural transmission that can lead to loss of memory(43).


B.2. Parkinson's disease
1. Free radicals and Parkinson's disease
Patients with Parkinson's disease have low levels of polyunsaturated fat in the substania nigra(44)(45). Also patients with the disease found to contain waste pigments of lipofusion(46) and other polymers in the neurons(47) where dopamine is most active.

2. Aging and Parkinson's disease
According to Julius-Maximilians-University, physiological aging and OS-dependent aggregation of proteins, accompanied with environment toxins(49) are found to associate to the progression of the disease(48).

3. Antioxidants and Parkinson's disease
Antioxidants play an vital role for patients with Parkinson's disease.
a. Superoxide dismutase
Researcher found that the progression of the disease may be associated with the decrease levels of superoxide dismutase, a antioxidant enzyme(50). According to University of Thessaloniki, patients with advanced Parkinson' diseases showed a statistically significant decrease of SOD activity in whole blood and in red blood cells(51).

b. NADH ubiquinone reductase
Levels of NADH ubiquinone reductase is decreased in the substania nigra(52) in patients with PD, causing neurons apoptosis, but this can be treated with antioxidants Acetyl-L-carnitine (53) and alpha lipoic acid(54).

c. Uric acid
People with a high blood level of the natural antioxidant uric acid have a lower risk of developing Parkinson's disease(55) than do people with lower levels(56), but high levels of uric acid increases the risk of kidney diseases(57) and gout(58).

d. Glutathione
Glutathoine showed to deactivate the harmful product HNE of lipid peroxidation(59).

f. Etc.

B.3. Multiple Sclerosis
1. Free radicals and Multiple Sclerosis
Free radical activity is a contributory factors in MS(60) due to proinflammatory cytokines in free radicals production in the peripheral immune and central nervous system (CNS)(60).

2. Antioxidants and Multiple sclerosis
Antioxidants protect the neural tissues from damage against inflammation caused by oxidative stress.
a. TNFalpha
TNFalpha, an imflammatory cytokine showed to associate with MS inhibited by antioxidants(61)) of green tea(62), and curcumin(63).

b. Melatonin
Melatonin functions as an antioxidant has the ability to protect neurons(65)(66) from free radicals cause of lipid peroxidation(64).

c Selenium
Some studies found that the level of selenium in the blood of people with MS was lower than in that of people without(67)(68). In patients with MS, all abnormalities may be normalized by daily intake of selenium(69),

d. Niacin
Niacin acting as antioxidant is a key to the successful treatment of multiple sclerosis, profoundly prevents the degeneration(70) of demyelinated axons and improves the behavioral deficits(71).

e. Vitamin D
Serum of 25(OH)D level showed to regulate expression dynamics of a large gene-gene interaction system in immune modulatory processes of MSactivity(72). According to the study published by the journal Neurology, group receiving vitamin D supplement demonstrated a remarkable 41 percent reduction in new MS events with no meaningful side effects(73).

f. Etc.


B.4. Lou Gehrig's disease(Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis)
1. Free radicals and Lou Gehrig's disease
Researchers found that glutamate in the synapses enhances the production of free radicals(77) only in motor nerve cells but spares other nerve cells(74) such as cells control senses and other body functions, causing disruption of astrocytes in regulated glutamate levels(76).

2. Antioxidants and Lou Gehrig's disease
a. Vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin)
High doses of vitamin B12 as an antioxidant have shown to improve or slow muscle wasting in the later stages of patients with ALS disease(78)(79).

b. Vitamin E
Vitamin E protected against cell membranes from lipid peroxidation damage(80) in reduced the risk of breakdown of the cell membrane cause of ALS(81).

c. Superoxide dismutase enzyme
Mutations in the superoxide dismutase enzyme can increase the risk ALS(82) in catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide(83).

d. Cerebral cortex
Oxidative stress and DNA alternation triggered neurons damage(84) were found in elevating levels in mice with ALS(85).

e. Amino acids
Diet high in amino acids as antioxidants have shown some promising effect in treating ALS(86)(87).


C. Diseases Causes of Dementia
1. Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is a brain disorder named for German physician Alois Alzheimer. Alzheimer's destroys brain cells, effecting memory, thinking and behavior severe enough to affect language communication, memory, lifelong hobbies or social life.

2. Stroke (Vascular problems)
Strokes caused by uncontrolled diet with high in saturated and trans fats, can lead to bad cholesterol building up(88) in blocking the circulation of blood to the body, thus increasing volume of infarction, in the brain(89). If oxygen is not delivered to the brain cells, some cells die off and can not reproduce(90), causing stroke(89). Others happen, when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures(91), it causes the cells in your brain deprived of oxygen with symptoms of vascular dementia(92)(93)(94).
According to the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with pre-strokeand post-stroke dementia by University Department of Clinical Neurology, 10% of patients had dementia before first stroke, 10% developed newdementia soon after first stroke, and more than a third had dementia after recurrent stroke(95).

3. Dementia with Lewy bodies
Lewy bodies is a condition of spherical masses displaced other cell components with symptoms of fluctuating cognitive ability with pronounced variations in attention and alertness, recurrent visual hallucinations and spontaneous motor features, including akinesia, rigidity and tremor(97). Abnormal aggregates of protein develop inside nerve cells are also found in Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia and some other disorders.(96). According to Mayo Clinic in MRI analysis of the characterizing the tissue abnormalities characteristic of Alzheimer disease and DLB, loss of tissues due to increased amygdalar diffusivity in dementia with Lewy bodies(DLB) may be related to small cavity in the cytoplasm of a cell, a common pathology associated with Lewy body disease(98).


4. Fronto-temporal dementia
Fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) or Pick's disease is clinical syndrome caused by degeneration of the frontal lobe(lobes of the brain lying immediately behind the forehead) of the brain, lead to symptoms ofdepression and executive dysfunction triggering the loss of autonomy, the risk of fall and of malnutrition in elderly patients(100). Early diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) is often difficult because of the non-specific presentation, a delayed-gross estimation of injury or dysfunction of the frontal lobe(99).

5. Progressive supranuclear palsy
Progressive supranuclear palsy, a condition of a movement disorder occurred as a result of damage to certain nerve cells with relatively specific patterns of atrophy, involving the brainstem, the latter frontoparietal regions, pontine tegmentum and the left frontal eye field(102) in the brain may lead to serious and progressive problems with control of gait and balance, including an inability to aim the eyes properly(101).

6. Korsakoff's syndrome
Korsakoff's syndrome, named after Sergei Korsakoff, a Russian neuropsychiatris, a neurological disorder caused by deficiency of Vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the brain and associated closely to chronic alcohol abuse and/or severe malnutrition, can lead to spontaneous alternation performance impaired in PTD accompanied by a significant reduction (30%) in phosphorylated synapsin I(103). Korsakoff's syndrome has been linked to neurotoxic effect of chronic alcohol consumption causes of medial thalami, mammillary bodies, and corpus callosum(104)
According to University of Campinas (Unicamp), the main causes of thiamine deficiency and viral infection or toxins in the blood, other adjunct factors, include magnesium depletion and chronic alcohol misuse, in the development of Korsakoff's syndrome(105)


7. Binswanger's disease
Binswanger disease also known as subcortical vascular dementia is a type of small vessel vascular dementia caused by microscopic areas of damage to the deep layers of white matter in the brain, including mostly of glial cells and myelinated axons in transmitting signals from one region of the cerebrum to another and between the cerebrum and lower brain centers.
Binswanger's disease frequency increased with age, independent of other risk factors, is associated with white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) deficits in selected cognitive functions(106). The disease is considered as
a progressive dementia, depression and "subcortical" dysfunction such as gait abnormalities, rigidity and neurogenic bladder(107). Control of hypertension may help prevent further progression of white matter disease(107).

8. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)
Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a condition of the progressive failure of the immune system caused by HIV, a lentivirus, originated HIV invasion of CNS by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), through progression of chronic inflammation induced dysfunction in neurons and astrocytes(star-shaped glial cells in the brain)(108). The presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (in systemic inflammation) may also increase the risk of the development of neurological dysfunction(109).

9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a form of incurable, fatal, degenerative neurological disorder cause of rapid decrease of mental function and movement due to the infectious replicate protein, including symptoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment resembled the final stages of Alzheimer's disease,inexplicable visual disturbances(110).

10. Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease is a condition of a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system causes of shaking (tremors) and difficulty with walking, movement, etc. with dementia commonly occurring in the advanced stages of the disease. According to study, in a survey of all stages of disease and 18.38 % demented from patients, caregiver and both, spychotic symptoms, mood/Apathy, and impulse control disorders are accounted for 66.63 % of the variance(111).

11. Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease is a condition of a neurodegenerative genetic disorder affected the muscle coordination causes of cognitive decline and psychiatric problems(17). Impairments of patients with Huntington's disease include speed of processing, initiation, and attention measuresin linear regression(112).

12. Motor Neurone disease (MND)
Motor neuron disease is a group of neurological disorders affected the motor neurones, located in the central nervous system (CNS), causes of cognitive and behavioural changes(113)

13. Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis is a condition of an inflammatory disease due to the damage of the fatty myelin sheaths around the axons of the brain and spinal cord, responded to vision, speech, walking, writing, and memory(114).

14. Obesity
Midlife and late-life obesity may increase the risk of dementia. In 480 persons with incident dementia, risk of dementia was associated to patients with for obese (BMI >30) and uderweight persons (BMI <20) but not overweight (BMI >25-30)(115).


D. Hormonal Causes of Dementia
1. Growth hormone
According to Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, physiological decline of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis due to ageing, may involve in the progression of cognitive deficits(116), probably due to ability of both hormones in stimulation of beta amyloid release from neurons and IGF-I involved on brain amyloid clearance(117).

2. Estrogen
According to Scientist at the Kings College London, the decreased production of estrogen due to aging in menopausal women may be association to the risk of dementia(118). Estrogen-replacement therapy has shown to reduce prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in postmenopausal women, but weighing risks and benefits of estrogen-replacement therapy must be taken into account(119)

3. Testosterone
Lower androgen levels in aging are associated with increased plasma Abeta 40 in older men with memory loss or dementia, according to the comparison of levels of serum total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and plasma levels of amyloid beta peptide 40(120).

4. DHEA
A decreased concentration of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) and lower DHEA-S/DHEA ratio are associated to risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD)(121)(122).

5. Sex-hormone binding globulin
Gonadotropins may be involved in processes and contribution to the etiology/pathogenesis of AD due to its involvement on inflammation, cholesterol homeostasis, and insulin status(123).

6. Etc.


E. Substance Abused Causes of Dementia
Illicit drug used may cause nervous system impairment due to their direct and indirect effects on the integrity and function of nervous system tissue, probably through immune altered effects(124). Injection drug users has shown to increase risk of dementia, up to 40% of patients with HIV infection(125)

1. Heroin
Heroin (diacetylmorphine or morphine diacetate (INN)), also known as diamorphine (BAN), an opiate drug extracted from the seed pod of the Asian opium poppy plant, showed to induce dysfunction of different components of cortico-striatal (forebrain) circuitry in response to recognition memory, spatial working memory, planning, sequence generation, visual discrimination learning, and attentional set-shifting of groups of subjects(126).

2. Cocaine and Methamphetamine
Cocaine (benzoylmethylecgonine) (INN), a crystalline tropane alkaloid obtained from the leaves of the coca plant showed to induce rapidly accelerating HIV dementia accompanied by seizures and an unusual movement disorder(127).

3. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)
Lysergic acid diethylamide, abbreviated LSD or LSD-25, also known as lysergide and colloquially as acid, is a semisynthetic psychedelic drug used to treat patients with mental disorders may temporarily alter the thinking processes, closed and open eye visuals, synaesthesia, an altered sense of time, etc.(128), but regain the ability to judge, to acquire competence and new learning, to focus attention and concentrate, to recall and retrieve relevant information(129)

4. Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA
Ecstasy, a highly addictive drug, is a powerful CNS stimulant with chemically similar to the stimulant methamphetamine and hallucinogen mescaline induced confusion, depression, sleep problems, drug craving, and severe anxiety(130).


5. Other illicit drugs
According to the study at University of Rostock, Dr. Büttner A., drug abuse represents a significant health issue. The major substances abused substances including cannabis, opiates, cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine and 'ecstasy'. altered intracellular messenger pathways, transcription factors and immediate early genes within the brain reward system may lead to cardiovascular complications, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms due to their widespread disturbances within the complex network of central nervous system in cell-to-cell interaction(131).


F. Diet Causes of dementia
Midlife characteristics of nonsmoking, body mass index (BMI) less than 25.0 kg/m(2), physically active, and having a healthy diet (based on alcohol, dairy, meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, cereals, and ratio of monounsaturated tosaturated fat) are associated to reduce risk of dementia(132)

1. Saturated fat and Trans fat(145)
Saturated fat is important for energy, hormone production, cellular membranes, especially in signalling and stabilization processes in the body, but over consumption can cause cholesterol building up in the arteries leading to heart diseases, stroke, diabetes, etc. A high saturated fat and cholesterol intake has shown to increase the risk of dementia, whereas fish consumption may decrease this risk(135)(145), probably due to involvement in the β-oxidation process of long-chain fatty acids, very-long-chain fatty acids, and branched-chain fatty acids of peroxisome(133)(145) in the breaks down molecules into smaller units to release energy of very long chain fatty acids(134). Intake of trans fat is also found to potentially increase the AD risk or cause an earlier onset of the disease due to its effects in increased production of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, main components of senile plaques(136).

2. Artificial sweetener
Artificial sweetener can cause obesity risk of dementia independent of diabetes and cardiovascular comorbidities(137). and induced increasing consumption of fat(138).

3. Fast Foods
Fast foods, unwholesome foods, containing high amounts of artificial ingredients, with an aim to be cooked fast and handed over to the customer in minutes may induce anxiety, tension, depression, difficulty in concentration, and memory of that can lead to onset of senile dementia(139).

4. Artificial ingredients
A standard American diet containing high amount of MSG and aspartame may induce the early onset of neurodegenerative disease(140)

5. Alcohol
Moderate alcohol drinking is associated with a reduced risk of unspecified incident dementia and AD(141)(145), but excessive consumption of alcohol not only causes liver damage but also increases risk of neuro-degeneration, including onset of dementia due to its neurotoxic and neuroprotective effect(142).

6. Low intake of fruits and Vegetables
Nutrition plays a role in the ageing process of the brain and suboptimal nutrient. According to The Chinese University of Hong Kong, older people with questionable dementia have lower intakes of vegetables, fruits(145) and fluid than those who were cognitively normal(143)

7. Meat
The typical American diet containing high amounts of red meat has shown to increase risk of cholesterol building up in the blood vessels and capillaries in causation of heart diseases and stroke(144) and cognitive impairment(135).

8. Etc.


G. Medication Causes of Dementia
As aging, accumulation of toxins of certain medication used to treat certain diseases, such as antidepressants, sedatives, cardiovascular drugs and anti-anxiety medications may cause increased risk of cognitive dysfunction, including dementia-like symptoms(146).
1. Antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics and benzodiazepines
An Antidepressant is a psychiatric medication used to treat mood disorders, such as major depression and dysthymia and anxiety disorders. According toJohns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. all antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), antipsychotics (atypical and typical), and benzodiazepines overtime of medication exposure, induced more rapid cognitive and functional decline in AD(147).

2. Anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
Risks for AD and all-cause dementia were lower significantly with the use of any NSAIDs, but there is a weak link associated between usage of NSAIDs and the risk of cognitive impairment but not dementia(148).

3. Cannabis
Cannabis has been used for the treatment of a number of conditions, including neuropathic pain, spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis, and chemotherapy-induced nausea, etc,. Chronic use of cannabis may impair intellectual abilities, probably through some causal pathways(149).

4. Hallucinogens
Hallucinogens, psychedelic drugs, used primary action in altered cognition and perception, may cause distortion of sensory perception, and other psychic and somatic effects, including sweating, heart palpitations, blurring of vision, memory loss, trembling, and itching(150).

5. Risperidone
The most prescribed antipsychotic medication has shown to increase risk of dementia(152) and other cognitive dysfunction, depending to overtime chronic exposure(151).

5. Others
a. Corticosteroids
Corticosteroids are synthetic drugs closely resemble cortisol, a steroid hormones produced by the adrenal glands to assist the physiologic processes, including stress response, immune response, and regulation of inflammation, carbohydrate metabolism, behavior, etc., but an excessive usage may induce risk of progressive cognitive decline(153)(154).

b. Antibiotics
Antibiotics are medication taken to treat a variety of infections found to be associated with increased risk of psychomotor deceleration, delirium and psychosis in elderly patients(155)(156).

c. H2-receptor antagonists
H2-receptor antagonists are medicines taken to reduce the amount of acid in the stomach by blocking one important producer of histamine2, may cause acute and chronic cognitive impairments(157)(158).

d. Etc.


H. Life Style causes of Dementia
1. Unhealthy diet
Unhealthy lifestyle choices lead to an increasing incidence of obesity, diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension and disorder of the metabolic syndrome(159)(160), are found to associate to risk of AD. Recent research supports the hypothesis that calorie intake, among other non-genetic factors, can influence the risk of clinical dementia(161).

2. Psychological and Neurological effects
Dysfunctional mind may be associated to dementia due to its effects on the cognitive profile of ALS, a subclinical behavioural-variant frontotemporaldementia (bvFTD(162). Stress, anxiety, depression(163), negative thoughts(162), unhealthy life style(159)(160), unwholesome diet(161), can cause memory, intellect, attention, thinking, comprehension and personality, with preservation of normal level of consciousness deficits(164)

3. Excessive alcohol drinking
Moderate alcohol drinking of less than 2 cups for men and 1 cups for women of red wine are said to offer possible health benefits(165), but binge drinkingin midlife and excessive alcohol usages are associated with an increased risk of dementia, according to the follow-up, 103 participants had developeddementia(166), including central pontine myelinolysis, Marchiafava-Bignami disease(167).

4. Smoking
Smoking is a risk factor for several life-threatening diseases, but its long-term afflicts of dementia is controversial and understudied. According to University of Eastern Finland, heavy smoking in midlife was found to associate with a greater than 100% increase in risk of dementia, AD, and VaD more than 2 decades later, in a follow up study of a total of 5367 people diagnosed withdementia (including 1136 cases of AD and 416 cases of VaD)(168).

5. Etc.


I. Genetic Mutation causes of dementia
Genetic mutation is a condition of changes of DNA structure and alteration in the inherited nucleic acid sequence of the genotype(169). There are always a concern of some dementia patients with inherited trails for passing them to their children.
1. Linkage of Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) to 2q35-q26
Genetic mutation of chromosome 2q35-q36 Lewy bodies (DLB) are multiplex, due to its complex mechanism than generally monogenic disorders. Identifying the first familial DLB gene may contribute to an entry point of DLB pathology, according to Belgian family,researchers(170)

2. VCP gene R155H mutation
Some patients in the same family with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have been diagnosed with high risk of cognitive decline due to the recurrent R155Hmutation, according to University of Genova(171).

3. Genetic mutation and Alzheimer's disease
4 genes have been identified to affect development of AD. with the amyloid precursor protein (APP ) gene, presenillin gene (PSEN-1), and presenillin gene (PSEN-1)) affect younger people, and apolipoprotein E (APOE ) iaffects older people(172).

4. Chromosome 3 (FTD-3) caused by a truncating mutation in CHMP2B
Presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation was found to associate to significantly decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) affecting brain capillaries(173) and contributing to the early on set of dementia.

5. Mutations in the NOTCH3
Mutations in the NOTCH3 gene are responsible for hereditary stroke disorder, contributed to an adult onset of hereditary ischemic stroke, vascular dementiaand psychiatric disorders(174).

6. Etc.


Symptoms and Complications of Dementia


Dementia is a neuropsychiatric disorder induced of cognitive impairment andbehavioral disturbances. The behavioral and psychological symptoms ofdementia (BPSD) are common, with a progressive loss of memory and other mental abilities, affecting a person's ability to perform usual tasks in everyday life.
A. Symptoms
A.1. Symptoms of Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is a brain disorder, affecting over 1 million people in US alone with well known symptoms of lack of concentration (56%), tremors (56%), depression (44%), lack of cooperation (36%), and delusions (32%), psychotic symptoms (delusions, hallucinations, and delirium) and tremors, and emotional symptoms (tearfulness and apathy, lack of concentration and appetite change), according to Hospital de Cruces, Plaza de Cruces s/n, Barakaldo in a study of total of 1014 patients(177). Other symptoms include

1. Increasing forgetfulness(178)
2. Communication difficulty(179)
3. Anxiety(180)
4. Mood and personal change(181)
5. Delay recall(183)
6. Repeat question(183)
7. Memory loss(182)
8 Aberrant motor behavior (184)
9. Sleep problems (184)
10. Eating problems (184) and
11. Agitation/aggression (184)
10. Etc.

A.2. Symptoms of Diminished quality of acetylcholine
If the nerves located in front of the brain perish, diminished quality of acetylcholine, it can cause language difficulty, memory loss, concentration problem and reduce mobile skills because of lacking reaction in muscular activity and refection.
Symptoms of deficiency of acetylcholine include(185)
1. Difficulty remembering names and faces after meeting people
2. Difficulty remembering peoples birthdays and numbers
3. Difficulty remembering lists, directions or instructions
4. Forgetting common facts
5. Trouble understanding spoken or written language
6. Forget where I put things
7. Slowed and/or confused thinking
8. Difficulty finding the right words before speaking
9. Disorientation
10. Prefer to do things alone than in groups / social withdrawal
11. Rarely feel passionate
12. Feel despair and lack joy
13. Lost some of my creativity / lack imagination
14 Dry mouth
15. Etc.

A.3. Dementia due to long-term alcohol abuse
Dementia is common in patients with alcoholism. Most symptoms of alcohol dementia are also presented in other types of dementia, with a few qualitative differences(186) involved both cortical and subcortical pathology. According to the article, "What's alcohol-related dementia?" Alcohol dementia induced deterioration in intellectual function with memory not being specifically affected, such as disinhibition, loss of planning, and executive functionsand a blithe disregard for the consequences of their behaviour, affecting mostly of women in the ages between 30 - 70 with the better rates better than for Korsakoff's Psychosis(187).
Other symptoms in deficits are most frequently observed on tasks of visuospatial function, memory(188) and higher-order (executive) tasks(189)

A.4. Multi-infarct dementia
Also known as vascular dementia, is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease in older adults, caused by different mechanisms, affecting the vascular lesions in the brain.with major neurovegetative symptoms of depression accompanied by depressed mood/anhedonia in patients with clinically-diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD) and multi-infarct dementia (MID)(190).
Symptoms include memory deficits(192) such as
1. Confusion
2. Memory problems
3. Wandering Getting lost
and
4. At least one of behavioural or psychological symptom, such as appetite disturbances irritability and anxiety and emotional suppresion(such as laughing inappropriately, crying inappropriately)
(193), and
5. Difficulty following instructions, and
6. Bladder incontinence
7. Bowel incontinence(191)

A.5. Dementia associated with Parkinson's disease
Parkinson disease (PD) is a disabling, progressive condition cause of cognitive deficits due to the interruption of frontal-subcortical loops that facilitate cognition and that parallel the motor loop, affecting motor function.These include olfactory deficit, sleep problems such as rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, constipation and male erectile dysfunction.(194).
Other symptoms due to dopamine (DA) deficiency, include, dysexecutive behaviors(196), such as planning, abstract thinking, flexibility and behavioural control and postural disabilities(197) and
1. Constipation
2. Difficulty swallowing
3. Choking, coughing, or drooling
4. Excessive salivation
5. Excessive sweating
6. Loss of bowel and/or bladder control(195)

A.6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)
People who have eaten contaminated beef in many years, may be infected with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) without even knowing it. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a quickly progressing and fatal disease, characterized by rapidly progressive dementia. Initially, individuals experience problems withmuscular coordination, personality changes, including impaired memory,judgment, and thinking and impaired vision. People with the disease also may experience insomnia, depression, or unusual sensations.(198).

A.7. Subdural hematoma
Subdural hemorrhages, the accumulation of blood beneath the outer cover of the brain resulted from the rupture of blood vessel may cause an increase in tracranial pressure, leading compression and damage to delicate brain tissue. Acute subdural hematoma has a high mortality rate.

Other symptoms include
1. Intermittent numbness and weakness of extremity(199) and
2. Loss of consciousnes(201)
3. Irritability
4. Seizures
5. Pain
6. Headache
7. Dizziness
8. Disorientation
9. Weakness
10. Weakness or lethargy
11. Nausea or vomiting
12. Loss of appetite
13. Personality changes
14. Confused speech
15. Difficulty with balance or walking
16. Altered breathing patterns
17. Hearing loss or hearing ringing (tinnitus)
18. Blurred Vision
19. Deviated gaze, or abnormal movement of the eyes(200)


B. The Complications
According to physical complications of patients with dementia occurred in the 12 months from April 2007 to March 2008 recorded in Ichinomiya CityHospital, Ichinomiya, the physical complications can be divided into two categories:
** Serious emergencies occurred with a possible high risk of mortality within a few days (e.g. pneumonia and upper airway obstruction); and
**Life-threatening complications arising required diagnosis and treatment by specialists from other medical departments (e.g. bone fracture andcancer)(202).

1. Pneumonia
Pneumonia is common among patients with advanced dementia, especially toward the end of life, due to microbial infection, according to Beth IsraelDeaconess Medical Center(203).

2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS)
The prevalence of OSAS increased with aging, occurring in up to 25% of older adults and up to 48% in patients with Alzheimer's disease, showed to induce symptoms of hypoxia, fragmented sleep, daytime sleepiness, cognitive dysfunction, functional decline, and brain damage, due to reduced cerebral blood flow, ischemic brain lesions, microvascular reactivity, white matter lesions, and grey matter loss(204)

3. Bone fracture
Bone mass and dementia in elderly hip fracture patients may be associated to levels of different aluminium concentrations in water supplies in the areas affecting the negative calcium balance of age-related osteoporosis together predispose to senile dementia.(205)

4. Urinary incontinence
Urinary incontinence is a common problem in dementia. Almost invariably, the person with dementia will develop incontinence as the diseaseprogresses. However, the primary reasons for incontinence are often not because of any significant pathology in the urinary system. Rather, it is due to factors outside the urinary system, including insertion of tube in assisting urinary flow(206)

5. Venous thromboembolism
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), caused by a blood clot breaking loose and traveling in the blood, in patients with dementia had a high incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) and fatal bleeding, according to the study of 37988 patients with 1316 (3.5%) having dementia(207).

6. Etc.

Prevention and Management


A. The Do's and Do Not's list
1. Mediterranean diet
If you are typical American dieter, you are at increased risk for the development of dementia, in advanced age, as the diet is classified as one of the most unhealthy diet in the existence, according to studies. Mediterraneandiet, high monounsaturated fatty acids energy intake appeared to be associated with a high protection against cognitive decline and reduced the prevalence of AD in older people(208). Also recent research supports the hypothesis of calorie intake, among other non-genetic factors, in influence of the risk of clinical dementia.(209).

2. Yoga
Senile dementia is the mental deterioration, such as loss of intellectual ability associated with old age. Yoga is believed to have beneficial effects on cognition, probably through attenuation of emotional intensity and stress reduction. Yoga participation showed to improve the memory performance, and all other psychophysiological parameters, in patient with dementia, including intellect, attention, thinking, comprehension and personality, with preservation of normal level of consciousness(210), according to G.J. PatelAyurved College.

3. Aging of theory of mind
According to Aging of theory of mind, educational level and cognitiveprocessing are two factors, influencing the pattern of the aging. Younger and older group with equally high education showed to outperform the older group with less education in false-belief and faux-pas tasks, with younger group outperformed the other two groups in the cognitive processing tasks(211).

3. Moderate alcohol drinking
Moderate alcohol drinking of less than 2 cups for men and 1 cups of red wine for women are said to offers possible health benefits, but Binge drinking (ie,alcohol exceeding the amount of 5 bottles of beer or a bottle of wine on 1 occasion at least monthly) in midlife is associated with an increased risk ofdementia, according to the follow-up, 103 participants had developeddementia(212).

4. Stop Smoking or never smoke before
Smoking is a risk factor for several life-threatening diseases, but its long-term association with dementia is controversial and somewhat understudied. According to a total of 5367 people (25.4%), heavy smoking in midlife was associated with a greater than 100% increase in risk of dementia, AD, and VaD more than 2 decades later(213).

5. Drink your tea and coffee
Caffeine in tea and coffee may enhance cognitive function acutely, but its link to dementia is somewhat inconsistent, but most studies support coffee's favourable and protective effects against cognitive decline, dementia or AD. Coffee drinking of 3-5 cups per day at midlife was associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD by about 65% at late-life(214).

6. Eat your fruits and veggies
Fruits and veggies containing high amounts of antioxidant enhance the immune system in fighting against forming of free radicals cause to damage to the brain cells in induced early onset of dementia. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplements in combination were associated with reduced prevalence and incidence of AD, according to The Johns Hopkins University(215).

7. Regular and moderate exercise for elder
Regular and moderate exercise may attenuate the cognitive dysfunction, but theirs' induced changes in cognition were not correlated with changes in mood/anxiety, probably through some separate neural systems mediation(216).

8. Avoid nutritional deficiency with balance diet
a. Beyond our believe, an excess of dietary carbohydrates, particularly fructose, alongside a relative deficiency in dietary fats and cholesterol,may lead to the development of Alzheimer's disease(217).
b. For more of Avoid nutritional deficiency with balance diet, please visit(218)

9. Avoid environment risk of dementia
Certain environment toxins produced as a result of industrialization or naturally have been linked to cognitive degenerative diseases. According to University of British Columbia, novel environmental toxins: steryl glycosides, a potential etiological factor for age-related neurodegenerative diseases, showed signs of mimicked ALS-PDC, including progressive deficits in motor, cognitive, and olfactory functions associated with neuron loss in the spinal cord, nigrostriatal system, cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb in fed mice(219).

10. No illicit drug, please(220)
Illicit drug used may cause nervous system impairment as a result of direct and indirect effects on the integrity and function of nervous system tissue and, potentially, through immune effects, especially, up to 40% risk of nervous system impairment for patients with HIV-1 infection.

11. Prevent prolonged period of using certain drugs
As aging, accumulation of toxins of certain medication used to treat certain diseases, such as antidepressants, sedatives, cardiovascular drugs and anti-anxiety medications may cause increased risk of cognitive dysfunction causes of dementia-like symptoms(221).

12. Etc.


B. Antioxidants and Dementia
B.1. Antioxidant enzymes
Antioxidant enzymes, chemical substances found in plants, protect the body from damage of free radicals by terminating the chain reactions through removing free radical intermediates and inhibiting oxidation reactions.
1. Catalase
Catalase is an enzyme, found in most living organisms exposed to oxygen for action of converse hydrogen peroxide (free radicals)(226) to water and oxygen. The antioxidants showed to protect cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide in pathogenesis of oxidative stress-related diseases(222) inducted early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides(225), including neurodegeneration(224) such as Alzheimer's diseas(223).

2. Glutathione peroxidase
The function of glutathione peroxidase is to protect the organism from oxidative damage and induced neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease(228) by removing lipid hydroperoxides(227), causes of oxidation of lipid cell membranes. probably through its major cellular peroxide scavenging enzyme(228) and maintaining the oxidative phosphorylation system and protecting mitochondria(229) and oxidative injury and amyloid toxicity of cortical neurons(230).

3. Glutathione reductase
Glutathione reductase, an antioxidant enzyme capable to regenerate Gglutathione (GSH) levels at 24h(233), and reduced pair of sulfur atoms glutathione to a organosulfur compound form of antioxidant (consisting of three amino acids joined by peptide bonds) may play an important role in prevention of damage of important cellular components induced neurodegenerative diseases such as PD(231)(232), caused by free radicalsand peroxides. probably through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties(231)

4. Super oxide dismutase (both Cu-Zn and Mn)
Super oxide dismutase is an important antioxidant and immune defence(224) in nearly all cells exposed to oxygen by converting superoxide into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, depending on the metal cofactor such as both Cu-Zn and Mn(225), probably through the attenuation of superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs)(225) in enhanced protection of biochemical/molecular/neurobiological function(226).

B.2. Metals binding proteins
1. Ceruloplasmin
Ceruloplasmin, the major copper-carrying protein in the blood, plays a role iniron metabolism(227). Decreased level of ceruloplasmin impaired ferroportin stability(229)(230)may induce progressive action tremor, and cognitive decline(227), causing the forming of superoxide anion radicals(231) and iron overload in the brain, liver, pancreas, and other organs(232).

2. Ferritin
Ferritin, the protein produced by almost all living organisms, acts as a component to fight against iron deficiency and iron overload(233)(234). In a soluble and non-toxic form, the protein is transported to the body needs, including organs(236) for enhancement of the immune system in the presence of an infection(237), against proliferation of lymphoid and myeloid cells(235), cancer(238) and prevention of the infectious agent in attempt of binding iron to form free radicals(239) in most cellular oxidation reactions(239).

3. Lactoferrin
Lactoferrin, a multifunctional protein of the transferrin family, is one of the components of the immune system(240) of the body used for fighting against foreign invasion of bacteria and virus(241)(242) and lipid oxidation(243) by inhibiting oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner even at concentrations beyond its capacity(244).

4. Metallothionein
Metallothionein, a family of cysteine-rich(24), low molecular weight proteins binds both physiological heavy metals(245) through detoxified fraction of accumulation(245) by capturing harmful superoxide and hydroxyl radicals(246) through binding the metal ions(247)(248) bounded to cysteine(249).

5. Transferrin
Transferrin, a glycoprotein binded iron very tightly but reversibly, enhances the immune system in fighting against infection, inflammation(250) by creating an environment low in free iron(251) impeded to cell oxidation(253)(254), through rapidly evolving sites reverse to bacterial binding in counteract bacterial iron piracy(250). Transferrin deformation and aggregation are found to associate to neurological disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease(252).

6. Hemoglobin
Hemoglobin, the protein molecule in red blood cells enhances the carrying of oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and return CO2 from the tissues to the lungs(255)(256). During oxidate stress, the cell membrane is protected by intraerythrocytic hemoglobin from the forming of free radicals(259), probably through regulating NO(258) and auxin homeostasis(257).

7. Myoglobin
Myoglobin is an iron- and oxygen-binding protein found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates. The binding of oxygen by myoglobin(260) through interaction with pathogens establishment of successful infection and survival is probably through peroxidase activity(261) in reducing the free radicals damage caused by oxidate stress(261)(262).

8. Etc.


B.3. Common Free Radical Scavengers
1. Bilirubin
Bilirubin is a prosthetic group with a unique function in breaking down molecules into smaller units for releasing energy, excreted in bile and urine(263). As a cellular antioxidant, it protected against diseases associated with oxidative stress, through mildly elevated serum bilirubin levels and activation of heme oxygenase(264) and reverted to biliverdin, a green tetrapyrrolic bile pigment, through antioxidant redox cycle in inhibition of the effects of mutagens when oxidized(265). A significant reduction of levels ofbilirubin, has shown to associate to patients with Alzheimer's disease(AD)(266).

2. Carotenoids
Carotenoids are organic pigments, occurred in the chloroplasts and chromoplasts of plants and some other photosynthetic organisms like algae, some bacteria. The antioxidant has been under intense scrutiny studies for finding of their potential in modulated chronic disease risk and prevention of vitamin A deficiency(267). Plasma levels of HDL and carotenoids have shown to lower in patients with dementia related vascular disorders(268) and Alzheimer's disease(AD)(269).

Beta-Carotene, an organic compound is classified as a terpenoid, a strongly-coloured red-orange pigment in plants and fruits.
Beta-Carotene is not toxic and stored in liver for the production of vitamin A(270) showed to inhibit cancer cell in experiment(271)(272). Its anti oxidative effects has shown to cover the main pathways for formation, transformation, and decay of free radicals(273), through its relation to the antioxidant/pro-oxidant properties(274). According to Yale University, the decreased non-enzymatic antioxidants in blood, including β-carotene showed a significant oxidative damage in the process of neurodegeneration(275).

3. Flavonoids
Flavonoid also known as Vitamin P and citrinare, is a yellow pigments having a structure similar to that of flavones occurred in varies plants. The antioxidant has been in human history for over thousands of years and discovered by A. S. Szent-Gyorgi in 1930. Vitamin C and flavonoids combination has shown to expressed wound healing in animal model(276).
Flavonoids process a property as antioxidants in inhibition of cell growth, differentiation and development, and overexpressed in gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, etc., probably through cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis(277). Intake of antioxidant flavonoids is associated to the reduced risk of incident dementia(278) and mild cognitive impairment(279).

Although nitric oxide is considered a free radical produced by immune system to destroy microbial(281) and cancerous cells(282)(283). Over produced NO, showed to induce inflammation(280). Flavonoids processed an ability in inhibited NO production of peroxynitrite(284) found to induce mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PD progression(285) and cause of inappropriate damage to blood and tissues(284).

4. Vitamin A, C, E
a. Vitamin A
Vitamin A occurred in the form retinol is best known for its function in maintaining a critical role in vertebrate development, cell differentiation, reproduction, vision and immune system(286). The vitamin also acts as an the major peroxyl radical scavenger role in biological lipid phases such as membranes or low-density lipoproteins (LDL)(291)(288), including incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) with respiratory failure(290), in fighting the increased free radicals activity by radiation(287), and enhancement of the productions of insulin pancreas(289).

b. Vitamin C
Vitamin C, presencted in aqueous compartments (e.g. cytosol, plasma, and other body fluids)(292) plays an important role in synthesis of collagen, carnitine, catecholamine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine(293). As an water soluble vitamin, vitamin C can be easily carried in blood, operated in many parts of body. By recycling vitamin E, vitamin C also helps to fight against forming of free radicals(294). By enhancing the immune system(295)(296), it promotes against the microbial and viral(298) and irregular cell growth causes of infection and inflammation(297).
Vitamin C also is a free radical scavenger in inhibiting pollution cause of oxidation(299).

c. Vitamin E
Vitamin E is used to refer to a group of fat-soluble compounds, including both tocopherols and tocotrienols(300), discovered by researchers Herbert Evans and Katherine Bishop. The vitamin not only is important in protecting muscle weakness(300), repairing damage tissues(302) caused by oxidation(303), and promoting blood clotting in healing wound(302), etc., it also, moved into the fatty medium to prevent lipid
peroxidation(301), inhibited free radicals chain reactions by curtailing them before they can start(304) and prevented or delayed cognitive decline, in both ageing population of and mild cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD)(306), according to R & D Human Nutrition and Health(305).

5. Etc.


C. Phytochemicals Against Dementia
C.1. Rosemarinol
Rosemarinol is a phytochemical monophenols, found in essential oil of labiate herbs like rosemary and in variety of other plants.
1. Retard autoxidation
Rosemary extract rich in carnosic acid showed a significantly retarded autoxidation, in the fish oil undergoes microencapsulation process(307).

2. Anti-inflammatory effects
The extract of rosemary leaves from supercritical fluid extraction showed a high inhibitory effect on lipid peroxidation, through suppression of the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO)(308) and maintaining oxidative stability(313)

3. Antioxidant defences
Rosemary extract enhanced antioxidant defences and improved antioxidant status in aged rats in attenuation of lipid peroxidation and ROS levels through its antioxidant enzyme activity(309). The extract also showed to exhibit its antioxidant effect against the proliferation of irregular cell growth such as human leukemia and breast carcinoma cells(312).


C.2. Gingerole
Gingerole, is also known as gingerol, a phytochemical of flavonoids (polyphenols) found in fresh ginger. and in variety of other plants. The herb has been used for treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, motion sickness, rheumatoid arthritis, relieve migraine, etc. in folk medicine.
1. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects
Chemical constituents of Zingiber officinale Rosc.(Zingiberaceae) showed to attenuate oxidative stress, through its scavenging, and inhibiting superoxide and hydroxyl radicals of ROS species(310), via nephroprotective effect on mediation of oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, and renal dysfunction(311).

2. Dementia
Ginger(70% aqueous/methanolic extract of dried ginger (Zo.Cr)) besides induced spasmolytic activity in stomach fundus in treating dementia in South Asia, it also inhibited butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) in improvement of cognitive performance patients with dementia(315) and vascular dementia(VaD)(315), probably through cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in reduced production of amyloid-β(316).

C.3. Naringenin
Naringenin, a flavanone, belonging to the red, blue, purple pigments of Flavonoids (polyphenols) found predominantly in citrus fruits is considered as one of powerful antioxidant with many health benefits.
1. Antioxidant, free radical scavenging
Naringin showed to reduce DNA damage through its antioxidant capacities in scavenging free radicals hydroxyl and superoxide(317). Cognitively,naringenin ameliorated Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration(318) by improving learning and memory ability of patient with early onset of the diseases(319). Pharmacologically, the phytochemical was found to be a potential anticancer, antimutagenic, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and antiatherogenic agent(320).

2. Anti-inflammatory effects(320)
Neuroinflammation is considered as a constant event in Alzheimer's disease (AD), with no evidences for its direct involvement in development(322). In diabetic mice model, naringenin exhibited its anti inflammatory activity in lowering blood glucose and urea nitrogen, increasing insulin level and creatinine clearance(321), probably through inhibition of iNOS protein and anti inflammatory pathways(323).

3. Immunity
Adaptive and innate immune deficit were shown to associate with cognitive dysfunction in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)(325).Naringenin, stimulated the production T cells in regulation of the immune system, and in suppression of allergies and autoimmune diseases(324) which are considered as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease variants(326).


C.4. Tangeritin
Tangeritin, one of the flavones, is found in tangerine and many citrus peels.
1. Neuroprotective effects
Natural antioxidant tangeretin, may be used as neuroprotective agent, for its significant effects on protection of striato-nigral integrity and functionality in patients with Parkinson's disease(327), probably through its anti-neuroinflammatory activity(328) via mitochondrial depolarization(329) in attenuated reactive oxygen species generation.

2. Antioxidants
Mature and immature calamondin (Citrus mitis Blanco) peel, containingtangeretin showed to exhibit its antioxidant(331) effects in enhancing the highest oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and superoxide scavenging effect(330), as well as ameliorating oxidative stress causes of DNA damage(332), mammary carcinoma(333)(334) and diabetes(335).


C.5. Curcumin
Turmeric, principal curcuminoid of the popular Indian spice, is a rhizomatousherbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, native totropical South Asia, used in traditional herbal medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent and to treat gastrointestinal symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome and other digestive disorders(336). Curcumin, a phytochemical found abundant in the plant, in acidic solutions (pH <7.4) turns yellow, whereas in basic (pH > 8.6) solutions turns bright red.
1. Alzheimer's disease and Anti-inflammatory agent
a. Alzheimer's disease
Increased antioxidant and anti-inflammatory consumption such as curcumin may reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) caused by amyloid beta (Abeta) accumulation(338) through reversal of Abeta-induced cognitive deficits and neuropathology(339). The phytochemical is also found to disaggregate Abeta in preventing fibril and oligomer formation(338). According to YamagataUniversity, its synthesized curcumin analogues used pharmateutically in treatment of amyloid β aggregation also experience notable result(337). In vitro and animal models, curcumin was effective, in lowering oxidative damage, cognitive deficits, synaptic marker loss, and amyloid depositio in prevented onset of Alzheimer's disease(340).

b. Anti-inflammatory agent
Curcumin, an anti-inflammatory agent(341), in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and neurodegenerative diseases,, decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cells signalling in response to inflammation(342)(343), in patients of ear infection and Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer'sdisease(344)(345), respectively.

2. Antioxidants
Curcumin also consisting anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activitie(346), in arthritis, strongly inhibited collagenase and stromely in expression at micromolar concentrations(346); in diabetes, scavenged free radicals and reduced LDL oxidation and cellular oxidative stress(347); in cancers, reduced accumulation of ROS causes of abnormal cells(348), through apoptosis(349); in neurodegenerative diseases, exerted autophagy-lysosomal activities, through removing damaged or dysfunctional proteins and cells with specific function(350) and regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS)(351)(352).

G.6. Gallic acid
Gallic acid is a phytochemical in the class of Phenolic acids, found abundantly in tea, mango, strawberries, rhubarb, soy, etc.
1. Cytotoxic and antioxidative activities(367)
Gallic acid showed to exert its antioxidant in inhibition of free radical effects against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH), a stable free-radical molecules(354), nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (SO) radicals(353)(355), probably through its chelation of ferrous ions(355). In bacteria, the phytochemical extract containing gallic acid also exhibited a strong anti microbial effect(357)(358) from species of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea(356); In cancers, gallic acid induced tumor cytotoxic effects(357), through antiproliferative induced apoptosis(359), cell cycle arrest(362) and suppression of cancer cell-mediated angiogenesis(360), such as mitochondrial dysfunction(361). Neurologically. gallic acid reduced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction causes of the pathology of secondary neuronal damage in induction of dementia(363); its anti-aggregating effect also inhibited α-synuclein (α-syn) causes of many neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies(364).

2. Anti inflammatory activity(367)
Gallic acid showed to inhibit inflammation(366) through its scavenging of superoxide anions, inhibition of myeloperoxidase release and activity via mediation of inflammatory process(365).

C.7. Cinnamic acid
Cinnamic acid is a phytochemical in the class of Hydroxycinnamic acids, found abundantly in cinnamon, aloe. etc.
1. Antioxidant effects
Mitochondrial oxidative damage is associated with a number of clinical disorders. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant (TPP-OH), including cinnamic acid exhibited its antioxidant activity in protection of cells against H(2)O(2) and linoleic acid hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress(371)(368). The phytochemical also showed a promising free radical scavenging(369) and anti-inflammatory(375), antidiabetic(374), antimicrobial(371), anticancer(377)(378), lipid-lowering(379)(380), and cardiovascular-disease-lowering activity(369)(370)(380). Neurologically, cinnamon has also been reported to have activities against neurological disorders(372)(375)(376), such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases(373)(370)

2, Anti-platelet aggregation
Novel ligustrazinyloxy-cinnamic acid derivatives showed to inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro(380), and its p-amidinophenyl esters also exerted antithrombotic effects as irreversible inhibitors of the vitamin-K dependent enzymes(382) which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(381).

C.8. Tyrosol
Tyrosol is a phytochemical compound, a derivative of phenethyl alcohol, belongings to the group of tyrosol esters, found mostly in olive oil. The phytochemical is best known for its antioxidants in protecting the forming of free radicals and lipid oxidation causes of heart disease(383).
1. Antioxidant effects
Tyrosol attenuated the elevated cellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species, NO scavenging(386) and lipid peroxidation, against bacterial invasion(386), DNA damage induced by dioxin toxicity(384) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)(385) probably through vary antioxidant-dependent mechanisms. Neurologically, tyrosol showed to exhibit its protective effect against dopaminergic neuronal induced degradation(387) and neurotoxicity(388).

2. Alzheimer Disease
In Alzheimer Disease, tyrosol has shown to protect neuro-cells damage against amyloid-β-Induced toxicity, probably through anti inflammatory pathways(389). In women, the phytochemical also exerted its antioxidative activity(391), in removing harmful compounds from the body, reducing risk of bacterial respiratory tract, intestinal, and genital tract infections(392), suppressing LDL(392) causes of the development of cardiovascular disease; and preventing oxidation induced diseases and conditions, such as cardiovascular disorders(392), cancer(392), osteoporosis(393)(394),Alzheimer disease(390)(395)(396)(397).

C.9. Silymarin
Silymarin is a phytochemical in the class of Lignans (phytoestrogens), found abundantly in artichokes, milk thistle, etc.
1. Antioxidants
Silymarin showed to exert the powerful antioxidant activity into protection of cells against arsenical cytotoxicity(399), via reduced lipid hydroperoxide (LHP) formation with no RNS induction and hepoprotective(400)(401) in ntitubercular and alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity assays in rats(400)

2. Neuroprotective effect
In impaired cognitive and neurochemical function of diabetic patients and streptozotocin induced diabetic rodents, silibinin promoted DNA protection and reduced oxidative stress in a brain specific area, in part via the activation of the HO system(402); In mouse mode with Parkinson's disease(404), treatment of the phytochemical attenuated dopamine levels induced neuro cells damage causes of apoptosis(403) via reduced brain myeloperoxidase activity associated with AD risk(405) and inflammatory signalling cells(404).


Treatments In conventional Medicine


Depending to the causes of disease, most medication are to control the symptoms
A. Alzheimer's disease and Diminished quality of acetylcholine
A.1. Treatments of mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease and Diminished quality of acetylcholine
1. Cholinesterase inhibitors
a. Cholinesterase inhibitors are the primary treatment, including tacrine(409)(410)(Cognex), donepezil(411)(412)(Aricept), rivastigmine(407)(408)(Exelon), and galantamine (Reminyl) for reductions in acetylcholine and acetyltransferase activity(406) induced cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD).
According to Dr. Trinh NH and the research team at the Massachusetts General Hospital, there was no difference in efficacy among variouscholinesterase inhibitors(413). Persistent drug treatment had a positive impact on AD progression in advanced disease(414).
In the article, Cholinesterase Inhibitors, posted in the Minister of health, the inhibitors, improved the effectiveness of acetylcholine either by increasing the levels in the brain or strengthening the way nerve cells response in communication between nerve cells, may temporarily promote or stabilize the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease(415).

b. Side effects are not limit to(416)(417)
b.1. Nausea
b.2. Diarrhea
b.3. Vomiting
b.4. Indigestion.
b.5. Abdominal pain
b.6. Loss of appetite
b.7. Fatigue
b.8. Weight loss
b.9. Etc.

A.2. Treatment of moderate and Severe Alzheimer's disease and Diminished quality of acetylcholine
1. Namenda®(418)(419)(memantine), an N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist(420) are the most common medication used to treat moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease, through it's therapeutic action in uncompetitive binding to the NMDAR for preservance of the physiological function of the receptor(421). But, according to other in 2 out of 3 six month studies, memantine showed only a small beneficial effect but not in patients with vascular dementia(422).

2. Side effects are not limit to(423)(424)
b.1. Confusion
b.2. Dizziness
b.3. Drowsiness
b.4. Headache
b.5. Insomnia,
b.6. Agitation
b.7. Vomiting
b.8. Anxiety
b.9. Etc.


3. Other medications
3.1. Anticonvulsants
a. Anticonvulsants are a diverse group of pharmaceuticals used in the treatment of seizures(425), chronic neuropathic pain(426), and the clinical syndrome of Alzheimer's disease(427) by suppressing the rapid and excessive firing of neurons(428). Some researchers suggested that seizure pathophysiology may relate to increased amyloid beta-peptide production(429), causing cytoskeletal dysfunction, cerebrovascular changes, neurotransmitter dysfunction or combinations(430). By modification of these pathophysiological pathways, anti-epileptic drugs such as sodium valproate and lacosamide may be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease(431)

b. Side effects are not limit to(432)(433)
b.1. Dizziness
b.2. Drowsiness
b.3. Unsteadiness
b.4. Nausea
b.5. Vomiting
b.6. Skin rashes
b.7. Etc.

3.2. Sedatives
a. A sedative or tranquilizer is a drug that calms patients(434), reduced irritability and excitement by modulating signals within the central nervous system for neuroprotection(436). The medication are highly addictive. Benzodiazepine, one of the sedative has shown to reduce Aβ plaques through its activation on Aβ-related synaptic and behavioral impairment in AD(437).


b. Side effects are not limit to(438)
b.1. Stomach upset
b.2. Blurred vision
b.3. Headache
b.4. Impaired coordination
b.5. Depression
b.6. Memory loss
b.7. Drowsiness
b.8. Risk of fractures and falls(435)
b.9 Etc.

3.3. Antidepressants
a. Antidepressant is a type of psychiatric medication used to treat depression(443), including mood disorder(439), dysthymia(440)(441) and anxiety disorders(442)(443). According to Purpan-Casselardit Hospital, 34.8% of patients with AD are prescribed antidepressant foe daily use in AD(444).

b. Side effects are not limit to(445)
b.1. Dry mouth,
b.2. Blurred vision
b.5. Drowsiness,
b.4. Dizziness
b.5. Tremors
b.6. Sexual problems
b.7. Etc.

B. Treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome due to long-term alcohol abuse
Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome is a type of dementia resulted of long term alcohol abuse causes of irreversible damage of the brain(447) due to thiamine deficiency with high morbidity and mortality(446).
Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS) is not a rare disorder, particularly in individuals who abuse alcohol, but there are insufficient evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials to guide clinicians in the dose, frequency, route or duration of thiamine treatment(450)
1. Initial treatment consists of reversing the thiamine deficiency by giving supplemental thiamine(448) and intravenous (IV) thiamine has little risk(449), Usually, the treatments begin with an initial intravenous or intramuscular dose, then followed by supplemental oral doses(447).

Patients with diabetes are found to associate with 15% high risk of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome(451). Treatments of such patients should be taken accounted of glucose intake(453) as the combined diseases may causedisturbances of consciousness, or intoxication(452) with spiking acute serum glucose level(452).
According to State University of New York at Binghamton, treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome has shown to cause long-term alterations in neurogenesis(reduction of newly neuron generation) and gliogenesis(generation of non-neuronal Glial cells populations)(454).

Thiamine treatment usually can not reverse the loss of memory and intellect of Korsakoff psychosism but stopping alcohol use can prevent additional loss of brain function and damage to the nerves(456).

2. Side effects are not limit to(455)
a. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms
b. Experience hallucinations,
c. Confusion, and/or
d. Agitation.
e. Etc.


C. Dementia associated with Parkinson's disease
Parkinson disease (PD) is a disabling, progressive condition induced symptoms of olfactory deficit, sleep problems such as rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, constipation and the more recently described male erectile dysfunction(456), due to the interruption of frontal-subcortical loops facilitated cognition and parallel the motor loop(457).
Contrary to common perception, many non-motor symptoms (NMS) also link to early onset of PD(459) and some may even predate the diagnosis of PD based on motor signs(458).

C.1. Treatments of Dementia Associated with Parkinson's Disease
Treatments are depending to the degree of functional and cognitive impairment, according to the suggestion of the Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force on Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM)(480) and Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology(488)
1. Treatments for the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease
a. Tricyclic antidepressants nortriptyline(459) and desipramine(460) for the treatment of depression or depressive symptoms
b. Macrogol for the treatment of constipation(461)
c. Methylphenidate(462) and modafinil(463) for the treatment of fatigue
d. Amantadine for the treatment of pathological gambling(464)(465)
e. Donepezil(466)(467), galantamine(468), and memantine(470) for the treatment of dementia
f. Quetiapine(471)(472) for the treatment of psychosis
g. Fludrocortisone(473)(474) and domperidone(475)(476) for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension
h. Sildenafil(477)(478) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction
i. Ipratropium bromide spray(479)for the treatment of sialorrhea
j. Levodopa/carbidopa controlled release (CR)(481), pergolide(482), eszopiclone(483)(484), melatonin(485) 3 to 5 mg and melatonin 50 mg for the treatment of insomnia
k. Modafinil(486)(487) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness

C.2. Treatments for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease
According to the Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force on Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Review of Treatments for Parkinson's Disease (PD) was first published in 2002 and updated in 2005 to cover clinical trial data up to January 2004 with the treatments on motor symptoms of PD(489), including

a. Piribedil(490)(491), pramipexole(491), pramipexole extended release(492)(493), ropinirole(491), rotigotine(494), cabergoline(491), and pergolide(491) were all efficacious as symptomatic monotherapy
b. Ropinirole prolonged release(495) was likely efficacious as a symptomatic adjunct therapy
c. Prevention/delay of motor fluctuations, pramipexole(496) and cabergoline(497) were efficacious
d. Prevention/delay of dyskinesia, pramipexole(498), ropinirole(499), ropinirole prolonged release(500), and cabergoline(501) were all efficacious, whereas pergolide(502) was likely efficacious.
e. Duodenal infusion of levodopa(502)(503) was likely efficacious in the treatment of motor complications, but the practice implication is investigational.
f. Rasagiline conclusions were revised to efficacious as a symptomatic adjunct(504), and as treatment for motor fluctuations(505).
g. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation(506), bilateral globus pallidus stimulation(507), and unilateral pallidotomy(508) were updated to efficacious for motor complications.
h. Physical therapy(509)was revised to likely efficacious as symptomatic adjunct therapy.

C.3. Side effects
Most conventional medicine induced certain side effects. If you are taken any of these medicine, please consult your doctor. You also can search them from respectable sources. Here are some examples.
a, Macrogol(Allergic reaction (rash, itching, shortness of breath) changes in your body's fluid or electrolyte levels (swollenankles, other swelling, fatigue, dehydration, increased thirst with headache), Abdominal pain. Mild diarrhoea. Nausea. Vomiting. Swollen abdomen)(510).
b. Methylphenidate (stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite; vision problems, dizziness, mild headache; sweating, mild skin rash; numbness, tingling, or cold feeling in your hands or feet; nervous feeling, sleep problems (insomnia); or. weight loss)(511).
c. Modafinil (Black, tarry stools, blurred vision or other vision changes, chest pain, chills or fever, clumsiness or unsteadiness, confusion, dizziness or fainting, increased thirst and urination, mental depression, problems with memory, rapidly changing moods, shortness of breath, sore throat, trembling or shaking, trouble in urinating, uncontrolled movements of the face, mouth, or tongue unusual bleeding or bruising and unusual tiredness or weakness)(512).
d. Etc.

D. Dementia associated to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
People who have eaten contaminated beef in a prolonged period of times may be infected by infectious agent prion(514) without even knowing it. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a quickly progressing and fatal disease(513) inducing dementia(515), especially in elder(516), causing degeneration of skeletal muscle, peripheral nerves(517) linked to mutations in the PrP gene(518). CJD is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia(513)(519). Initially, individuals experience of epilepsy seizure(519), problems with muscular coordination(522); cognitive change (loss of motor planning, loss of motor functioning's, inability to speak)(519), such as impaired memory(521), loss of functional independence(523) and impaired vision(520). People with the disease also may experience insomnia(524)(525), depression(526)(527), or unusual sensations(522).

Treatments of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)
There is no treatment that can cure or control CJD. The available treatments are to relieve the symptoms and may help slow the disease.
1. Interleukins
a. Interleukins is defined as any group of naturally occurring proteins that mediate communication between cells(528), produced by while blood cells. The set of interleukins stimulated by a specific infectious agent in determined cells in responding to the infection and influences(528) through its modulated inflammation and immune response.(529).
According to University Hospital Göttingen, interleukin 10 levels, inflammatory cytokines(530) were significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of CJD, dementia, motoneuron disease patients through it inflammatory cytokines(529). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)(532) and prostaglandins (PGs)(533) are the most conventional medicine used to treat neurotoxiticy in acute conditions, including in inflammatory chronic diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD)(531).

b. Common side effects are not limit to
b.1. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)
b.1.1 Insomnia,
b.1.2 Abdominal pain,
b.1.3. Flatulence (gas),
b.1.4. Headache ,
b.1.5. Nausea and diarrhea.

b.2. Prostaglandins (PGs)
b.2. Dizziness
b.2.2. Fainting
b.2.3. Irregular heartbeat or pulse•
b.2.4. Slow heartbeat

2. Other medication
2.1. Quinacrine
a. Quinacrine used for treatment of giardiasis caused by Giardia lamblia(535) may be a potential medicine for treatment of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease(CJD)(536)(537), according to a report in The Mail on Sunday 12 August 2001, entitled "Briton 'cured' in CJD drug trial"(534).
Although Quinacrine at a dose of 300 mg per day was reasonably tolerated, it did not induce significantly affect in course of prion diseases(537), including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD(538)(539).
b. Most common side effects are not limit to
b.1. Abdominal and cramps
b.2. Diarrhea
b.3. Fever
b.4. Headache
b.5. loss of appetite
b.6. Changes in menstrual flow
b.7. Nausea and vomiting

2.2. Gamma-aminobutyric acid, dopamine and serotonin
a. Other medication used to control aggressive and uncontrolled behavior, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid(541)(542)(543) with functions of inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system(540), (541)(543). Dopamine and serotonin(542)(543) also functioning as a neurotransmitter may be helpful.
b. Common side effects are not limit to
b.1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid
b.1.1. Anxiety
b..2.2. Dizziness
b.1.3.Drowsiness
b.1.4 dry mouth
b.1.5. Blurred vision
b.1.6. Constipation
b.1.7. Irritation
b.1.8. Joint or muscle pain
b.1.9. Increased appetite

b.2. Dopamine
b.2.1. Fast heartbeat
b.2.2. Headache
b.2.3. Nausea
b.2.4. Vomiting

b.3.. Serotonin
b.3.1. Feeling agitated, shaky or anxious
b.3.2. Indigestion
b.3.3. Diarrhea or constipation
b.3.4. Loss of appetite
b.3.5. Weight loss
b.3.6. Dizziness
b.3.7. Blurred vision
b.3.8. Excessive sweating
b.3.9. Insomnia
b.3.10. Dry mouth

E. Multi-infarct dementia
Also known as vascular dementia, is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease in older adults between ages of 60 and 75(571), caused by different mechanisms all resulting in vascular lesions in the brain(572)(573) with prevalence of major depression, depressed mood/anhedonia, and subjective and neurovegetative symptoms of depression(574).

Treatments of Multi-infarct dementia
There are no treatments which can reverse the damage to the brain caused by small strokes(575), but the goal of the treatment is to control the symptoms and reduce the risk factors to prevent future strokes(576) by prescribed medicine to make the blood thinner to reduce the risk blood clot causes of future stroke.
E.1. Medication
1. Plavix
Plavix tablets is pescription-only medicine with function of keeping blood platelets from sticking together and forming clots(577) to prevent blood clotted causes of future stroke(579). In some cases, it is used conjunction with aspirin(578).

b. Side effects are not limit to
The most common side effects of Plavix (occurring in more than 2 percent of people and more often in the group taking Plavix) include:
b.1. Constipation
b.2. Diarrhea
b.3. Dizziness
b.4. Headache
b.5. Heartburn
b.6. Joint or muscle pain
b.7. Nausea and vomiting
b.8. Etc.
A sudden choking feeling, sore throat, difficulty swallowing and itchy mouth had been reported in patient taking clopidogrel 75 mg combined with 100 mg acetylsalicylic acid once daily, and metoprolol tartrate 50 mg twice daily(580)

2. Antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine)
a. Antipsychotic drugs effectively treat psychosis caused by a variety of conditions including dementia(581). Psychotic symptoms are classified as either positive or negative. Positive symptoms include hallucinations, delusions, thought disorders, bizarre or disorganized behavior(582). Negative symptoms include anhedonia, flattened affect, apathy, and social withdrawal(583).

b. Side effects are not limit to
In most cases, adverse effects are usually dose dependent and influenced by patient characteristics, including age and gender(584).
b.1. Constipation,
b.2. Dry mouth and
b.3. Blurred vision
b.4. Sleepiness and slowness
b.5. Weight gain
b.6. Stiffness and shakines
b.7. Hormone change
b.8. Diabetes
b.9. Etc.

3. Serotonin-affecting drugs (trazodone, buspirone, or fluoxetine)
a. Precursor amino acids (PAA)of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine showed clinical and psychologic improvement with conflict results(585)
b. Side effects are not limit to
b.1. Diarrhea
b.2. Drowsiness
b.3. Nausea,
b.4. Vomiting and agitation(585)

4. Anti anticonvulsant
Anti anticonvulsant, clonazepam has shown to control logorrhea, hyperactivity, agitation, intrusiveness, and impulsive violence and to promote cooperation in patient with multi-infarct dementia, according to East Carolina University School of Medicine(586).

b. Side effects are not limit to
b.1. Dizziness
b.2. Drowsiness
b.3. Unsteadiness
b.4. Nausea
b.5. Vomiting
b.6. Skin rashes
b.7. Etc.

5. Rivastigmine, is a cholinergic agent used for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia(587)
a. On cognitive function, rivastigmine, at dosages approved for therapeutic use showed to improve all behavioral symptoms in 2 forms of VaD, MID and sVaD(590), except delusions, according to University of Trieste(588).
50

The medicine, unfortunately, has been reported to induce side effects that lead to withdrawal in a significant proportion of patients(589).

b. Side effects are not limit to
b.1. Nausea and vomiting
b.2. Loss of appetite
b.3. Weight loss
b.4. Diarrhea
b.4. Dizziness
b.5. Drowsiness
b.6. Trembling
b.7. Etc.

E.2. Surgery
In case of sensory problems, surgery can be helpful.
F. Subdural hematoma is the accumulation of blood beneath the outer coveri of the brain resulted from the rupture of blood vessel(545)(546). Subdural hemorrhages may cause an increase intracranial pressure(545), induecd compression and damage to delicate brain tissue(547). Acute subdural hematoma has a high mortality rate(546). The diseases are most prevalent among elderly individuals(544).

F. Treatments of Subdural hematoma
1. Emergency treatment
An acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rapidly clotting blood collection(548) below the inner layer of the dura but external to the brain and arachnoid membrane(549). Two further stages, subacute and chronic, may develop with untreated acute subdural hematoma (SDH)(549). There is always important to maintain survival of the patient with acute subdural hematomas(550)(551) because of its unfavourable outcome in the majority of cases(551). Emergency treatment is necessary to reduce pressure and allow blood to drain by drilling a small hole in the skull and inserting a temporary small catheter through a hole drilled through the skull and sucking out the hematoma(552)(564). Although hematoma resolution has been reported, it cannot be reliably predicted, and no medical therapy has
been shown to be effective in expediting the resolution of acute or chronic subdural hematomas(552)(553).

2. Medication
In case of chronic subdural hematomas, Mannitol may be used to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP)(554)(555) as it produced a significant reduction in ICP and improved cerebral perfusion pressure(556).
a. Corticosteroids for brain oedema
Methylprednisolone is a synthetic glucocorticoid or corticosteroid drug(557). Researchers found that Methylprednisolone can effectively reduce myelin changes(559) accompanying brain oedema(558) induced by blood-brainbarrier opening with an osmotic insult(559).

b. Anticonvulsants for patient with seizures
In some cases, patients with chronic subdural haematoma may be treated with anticonvulsants for seizures prevention(560). The medicine has shown to reduce risk of seizures(562) to none and 1.8% in 73 patients given prophylactic antiepileptic drug treatment in Tokyo Medical and DentalUniversity study(561) and Beilinson Medical Center(562) studies, respectively.

c. Rifampicin for bacterial infection
Rifampicin is a naturally made, non-peptide antibiotic(563). It is bactericidal, killing agent by disabling the protein expression system universally conserved by all bacterial infection(567), but it can induce thrombocytopenia(565)(566) in acute subdural hematoma treatment.

3. Surgery
Large or symptomatic hematomas require a craniotomy, as a bone flap is temporarily removed from the skull to access the brain for removal of blood clot with suction or irrigation(568). According University of Cambridge,Cambridge, the use of a drain after burr-hole drainage of chronic subduralhaematoma and minimized the incidence of significant recollection(570) is safe and associated with reduced recurrence and mortality at 6 months(569).



Treatments In Herbal Medicine
A. Ginkgo Biloba(bai Guo)
Ginkgo biloba is the oldest living tree species, genus Ginkgo, belonging to the family Ginkgoaceae, native to China, from temperate zone to subtropical zone and some parts of north America(592). The herb been used in traditional herbal medicine in treating impotence, memory loss, respiratory diseases, circulatory disorders and deafness as well as preventing drunkenness, and bedwetting(591).
a. The memory enhancing effects
Capsules containing 60 mg of a standardised extract of Ginkgo biloba(GK501) and 100 mg of a standardised extract of Panax ginseng (G115) significantly improved an Index of Memory Quality(593), including learning and memory but not working and long-term memory(596). Its extract, in the logical memory test and nonsense picture recognition also exhibited improvement of 58.62% logical memory in compared to baseline(594). Commercial extract Ginkgo biloba EGb 761 is also found to enhance certain neuropsychological/memory processes of cognitively in older adults, 60 years of age and over(595).

b. Cognitive performance
Administration of single doses (120, 240, 360 mg) of standardised Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE), according to Northumbria University, showed to improvecognitive performance, including speed of attention, accuracy of attention, secondary memory, working memory, speed of memory, quality of memory(597). Combination of standardised extracts of Ginkgo biloba (GK501, Pharmaton SA) and Ginseng (G115, Pharmaton SA) administration showed a consistent effect on mood and aspects of cognitive performance ("quality of memory", "secondary memory", "working memory", "speed of memory", "quality of attention" and "speed of attention") in doses depend-manner(598). On acute cognitive effects, Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) with soy-derived phospholipids, improved secondary memory performance and significantly increased speed of memory task performance in comparision to post-dose testing sessions(599).

c. Cognitive impairment
Extracts of the leaves of Ginkgo biloba showed to improve a range of conditions including memory and concentration problems, confusion, depression, anxiety, dizziness, tinnitus and headache, recognition, regeneration, understanding, and recitation(603), probably thought its action in increasing blood supply by dilating blood vessels, reducing blood viscosity, modification of neurotransmitter systems, and the density of oxygen free radicals(600).
EGb761, a commercial product of Ginkgo biloba at 240 mg/day, stabilized or slow declined in cognition, function, behavior, at 22-26 weeks (602).
According to University of Oxford, the use of Ginkgo biloba treatment of cognitive impairment appeared to be safe with no excess side effects, but with inconsistent results(601).

d. Etc.


B. Lemon Palm
Lemon Balm is a perennial plant in the genus Melissa, belonging to the family Lamiaceae, native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. The herb has been used in traditional medicine to treat nervous complaints(604), lower abdominal disorders(605) and as anti-inflammatory(608), antivirus(606), antibacterial agent(607).
a. Behavioral and psychological symptoms
According to Newcastle University, lemon balm showed to alleviate behavioral and psychological symptoms in patient with dementia (BPSD)(609), including anxiety(614). Lozenge, containing lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemonbalm and oat showed to induce a state of relaxation and regeneration for better cope with psychological and emotional stress(610)(611) and attenuation of mood and anxiety(612). In behavior symttoms, administraion of combined valerian root and lemon balm extracts, improved symptoms of poor ability to focus decreased from 75% to 14%, hyperactivity from 61% to 13%, and impulsiveness from 59% to 22% as well as general social behavior, sleep symptoms in children(613). On laboratory-induced psychological stress, the standardized M. officinalis extract, a significant increase in the speed of mathematical processing, with no reduction in accuracy(617).


b. Cognitive performance and mood
A standardised M. officinalis preparation administered showed significantly in eradicated mood change and cognitive impairment(614), according to joint study lead by Swinburne University. Acute administration of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) in high dose, enhanced cognition and mood in both Secondary Memory and Working Memory factors(615)(616), probably through its function in modulation of mood and cognitive performance through lowering both nicotinic and muscarinic binding in healthy humans(616). Due to different preparations derived from the same plant species, some researchers suggested that the effectiveness may exhibit different properties depending on the process used for the sample preparation(616).

c. Etc.


C. Lavender
Lavender is a flower plant of the genus Lavandula, belonging to the family Lamiaceae, native to Asia. The herb has been used in traditional medicine as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and mood alleviating(618), and burns and insect bites effects(623) agents, as well as treatment for depression, stress and mild anxiety(621) probably through its phytochemicals(constituents (-)-linalool, (+)-α-pinene and (+)-limonene ) in modulation of the immune and neuroendocrine system by interfering with metabolism of tryptophan(618).

a. Spatial performance
Lavender extract (LE, in AD animal model, showed effectively in improvement of spatial performance, through attenuation of Aβ production in histopathology of hippocampus(619) involved in memory forming, organizing, and storing. Its aqueous extract also significantly improved the performance of control and reverse spatial learning and memory deficits(621) in AD rats(620). Inhaledlavender oil, in oxidative stress induced rat, exhibited neuroprotective effects through its potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities(622).

b. Behavioural symptoms
Lavender aromatherapy, according to Kongju National University, was effective on emotions and aggressive behavior of elderly with dementia of the Alzheimer's type(624)and reduced disruptive behaviour in people with dementia(625). In agitated behaviour in severe dementia, 2% lavender oilaromatherapy stream administered on the ward for a two hour period, showed a modest effects in compared with placebo(626). The effectiveness of the herb in reduced behaviours in individuals with dementia potentially provide a safer intervention rather than reliance on pharmacology alone. The study's findings will translate easily to other countries and cultures(627).

c. Cognitive performance and Mood disorders
Aromatherapy applied to 28 elderly people with dementia, 17 of whom had Alzheimer's disease (AD), showed significant improvement in personal orientation related to cognitive function on both the Gottfries, Brane, Steen scale (GBSS-J)and Touch Panel-type Dementia Assessment Scale (TDAS), according to Tottori University(628) and emotions and aggressive behavior of elderly with dementia, according to Kongju National University(629). In emotional parameters, lavender essential oil also significantly enhanced mood responses, including anxiety(631)(633) and
depression(632)(634) probably through its relaxing effect(630).

d. Etc.

D. Huperzine A, a chemical made from the plant Huperzia serrata has been studied for its effect on patient of dementia with conflict results.
a. Cognitive effects
In induced Alzheimer's disease animal study, Huperzine A showed a significant effect in inhibited acetylcholinesterase, derived from forebrain, hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum(635), through neuron protective effects and enhanced glutamatergic functions(635). In mild to moderate vasculardementia (VaD) patients, the medicine also improved the cognitive function with serious adverse events(636). According to Beijing University of Chinese Medicinealthough Huperzine A showed a beneficial effects on improvement of cognitive function, daily living activity in global clinical assessment in participants with Alzheimer's disease, the findings should be interpreted with caution due to the poor methodological quality of the included trials(638). But according to University of California,, in a phase II trial of huperzine A, regardless to doses, huperzine A did not demonstrate cognitive effect in patients with mild to moderate AD(637).

b. Inhibition of amyloid plaque burden and oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ)
Huperzine A, showed to reduce in Aβ levels and Aβ burden in AD brain, through activation of Wnt signaling(regulate cell-to-cell interactions) and targeting of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in various components in contribution to disease(639) through modulation of amyloidogenic and nonamyloidogenic pathways(640), and reduction of iron in the brain(641) via a multi-target mechanism(642).

c. Mild to moderate vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease
In patients with mild to moderate vascular dementia (VaD), Huperzine A significantly improved the cognitive function in mini-mental state examination (MMSE), clinical dementia rating (CDR), and activities of daily living (ADL) scores(643)(644).
In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huperzine A also showed improvement in memory function and cognitive enhancement at a dose of 0.4 mg using MMSE, MQ, ADAS-COG, and ADL tests(645); against organophosphate (OP) intoxication and reduction of glutamate-induced cell death(646). According to Georgetown University Hospital, the antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of Huperzine A may be useful as a disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD)(647).
Due to data supporting its use are limited by weak study design, the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Worcester/Manchester suggested that randomized, placebo-controlled trials are necessary to establish the role of huperzine A in the treatment of AD(648).

d. Etc.


E. Bacopa
Commonly known as Waterhyssop or Water Hyssop, the herb is a semi-woody plants, genus of Hyssopus, belonging to the family Lamiaceae, native to the east Mediterranean to central Asia, used in traditional medicine as an antibiotic(660)(659), carminative, antispasmodic, antifungal(661), and antiseptic(661)(662) agents and to treat bronchitis(663), asthma(664), digestive ailments(665)(668), insomnia(666), diabetes(667), edema(669)(670), etc.
a. Increases Cerebral Blood Flow
In cerebral blood flow (CBF), Bacopa monnieri's promoted blood flow through its procognitive effect in comparison via dose-dependent hypotensive actions (671). |Together with Ginkgo biloba and donepezil(671)may be a potential attenuation of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy(672).

b. Ethnobotanical treatment
Bacopa, ethnobotanically, may be used as brain tonification(676) and to treat various diseases(673), including Alzheimer's disease
through its phytochemicals in alleviation of AD pathology and associated symptoms(674). According to university System HSC College of Medicine, Bacopa monniera extract (BME), administered starting at 2 months of age for either 2 or 8 months on test mice, significant lowered Abeta 1-40 and 1-42 levels in cortex by as much as 60%, and reverses Y-maze performance and open field hyperlocomotion behavioral changes(675). Its natural products (galantamine and rivastigmine), also has been used pharmaceutically for cognitive and behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)(673).

c. Cognitive performance, anxiety, and depression
In olfactory bulbectomized mice, alcoholic extract of Bacopa monnieri(L.) showed to ameliorate memory and emotional deficits(678) and enhanced cognitive performance(679) through its protection of cholinergic systems from OBX-induced neuronal damage(677). In normal healthy participants, the herb also attenuated stress reactivity and mood, through its adaptogenic and nootropic effects, probably via reduction in cortisol levels(680). According to National College of Natural Medicine, standardized dry extract of Bacopamonnieri, promoted the improvement depression scores, combined state plus trait anxiety scores,with few adverse events, primarily stomach(681)

6. Other potential herbs
Herbs used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(682)(683) in traditional medicine, may be due to their effectiveness of phytochemicals in attenuation of oxidative stress and neuro inflammation via neuroglial activation(683).
According to University of Wollongong, herbs and spices, containing high amount of phytochemicals in traditional history of use, with strong roles in cultural heritage, may have a distinguished effect in cognitive decline associated with ageing and the acute effects of psychological and cognitive function(684), probably through active ingredients of spices in modulation of neural response in the peripheral nervous system, via interaction with TRP channel/receptors(685).

Phytochemicals have been studied intensively including
1. Cannabinoids (e.g. cannabidiol) from Cannabis sativa, may be emerging as potential therapeutic agents for treatment of symptoms of dementia(686)(687). In Alzheimer's disease. the phytochemicals have found effectively against multifactorial illnesses as Alzheimer's disease, through inhibition of BuChE(689) and AChE(690) enzymes by a non-competitive or mixed mechanism(688).

2. Resveratrol (occurs in various plants) showed to improve cognition and reduces oxidative stress, by promoting learning and memory ability in vascular dementia(692) and decrease malonyldialdehyde levels(691). In Alzheimer's Disease, the phytochemical exerted its neuroprotective effect(694)(695), in decreased Aβ accumulation, tau protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress(693), and may be used for aging population in the prevention of various age-related neurological disorders(694).

3. Curcumin (from turmeric [Curcuma longa]), in pharmacological activities, besides promoted cognition and mood in a healthy older population(695), it also exhibited beneficial role in several neurodegenerative disorders(696) against administered streptozotocin (STZ)induced dementia model(696)(698), probably through its antioxidant effect(697). In Alzheimer's Disease, the herb also showed in reversed cognitive deficits, through its function in decreased GSK-3β levels(Glycogen synthase kinase 3, a protein) related to onset of Alzheimer's Disease(699)), and increased promoter activity of the TCF/LEF in binding DNA(600) and cyclin-D1(a protein) in regulating cell cycle progression(701).

4. Crocetin, a phytochemical found in Saffron (Crocus sativus), protected cerebrocortical and hippocampus neurons against ischemia, by improving spatial learning memory after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in animal study(703) through its antioxidant effects(704) in decreased oxidative stress(704). According to The University of Tokyo, the effectiveness of the herbal phytochemicals crocetin and crocin, also enhanced learning behaviour and promoted memory recall(705). In severe Alzheimer's Disease and mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease patients, saffron extract showed to be comparable with memantine in reducing cognitive decline in 1 year(706) and reduce cognitive decline in 22 weeks administration(707), respectively.

5. Ginseng (Panax species), showed to be beneficiary on age-related cognitive impairments through the activities of its members of ginsenosides(708) and Non-ginsenoside nicotinic agents(709).

6. Sage (Salvia species), may also be used as a potential novel natural treatments for the relief of some diseases including dementia, according to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences(710).

But according to Jodrell Laboratory, the use of such remedies in complex mixtures of different plants in traditional folk medicine may induce complication in interpretation of pharmacological activity and challenges for quality control(702).


Treatments in Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine
A. In General herbal Chinese medicine
According to the Unilever R&D Shanghai, and Unilever R&D Vlaardingen, Dr. and the team of researchers, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), in 3000 years' literary history, the top 5 TCM herb ingredients including Poria cocos(720), Radix polygalae, Radix glycyrrhizae, Radix angelica sinensis, and Radix rehmanniae have been used extensively for treatment of dementia(*).
A.1. Poria cocos(Fu Ling)
Fu Ling, fu shen or fu ling pi also known as Poria, the bland, sweet and neutral herb has been used in TCM as diuretics(711) and to treat urinary difficulty(711), edema(711), diarrhea(715), emesis(717), vomiting(716), dizziness(716), heart diseases(717)(718), etc., as it eliminates water, strengthens the Spleen, calms the Mind, etc., by enhancing the functions of heart, spleen, lung and kidney channels. The herb has shown to exhibit various biological activities including anti-tumor(713), anti-inflammation(712), immunodepression(712) and antioxidant(711)(713)(714).

Phytochemicals
1. Pachymose
2. Albuninoid
3. Pachymaran
4. B-pachyman
5. B-pachymanase,
6. Pachymic acid,
7. Tumulosic acid,
8. Eburioic acid,
9. Pinicolic acid,
10. Etc.

Fu Ling(720) used for treatment and prevention of dementia(719) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to their effectiveness of phytochemicals in attenuation of oxidative stress in initiation of neurodegeneration and enhanced neuroprotection(719).

1. Learning and memory impairments
Kyung-Ok-Ko (KOK), the traditional Chine medicine formula, containing Poria cocos, showed effectively in exhibition of its anti-inflammatory effects in protection of brain neuron through attenuating memory(721)(722) and learning impairment(723). In senile dementia, herbal Poria cocos also elicited memory-improving effects in vivo and in vitro through its sinapic acid, tenuifolin, isoliquiritigenin, liquiritigenin, glabridin, ferulic acid antioxidants via cholinergic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, neurogenetic, and anti-Aβ activities(722).Yokukansan (TJ-54), another Chinese medicine formula, containing Poria cocos, also inhibited neurological disorders, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease(723) symptoms of memory and behaviors disturbance(724), probably through its anti-cholinesterase activity(725).

2. Cognitive dysfunction
In patients of dementia with cognitive dysfunction, Liuwei Dihuang decoction, containing Poria cocos, showed significantly in attenuated the neural apoptosis, inflammation and Aβ deposition in the hippocampus and cerebral corte(726) causes of cognitive impairment(727) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat. In spatial cognition, herbal formula Toki-Shakuyaku-San and fractions of Angelica acutiloba, improved memory and working memory impaired by scopolamine in animal study(728).

3. Alzheimer disease
In mouse model of Alzheimer disease, herbal formula Jangwonhwan, not only showed effectively in ameliorated AD-like pathology, but also exhibited its neuroprotective effects against Abeta-induced cell death, and Abeta accumulation and plaque deposition in the brain(730), probably through attenuation of reactive oxidative stress(729), by suppressed Aβ-induced apoptosis and ROS production(731).

A.2. Radix polygalae(Yuan Zhi)
Yuan Zhi, sweet and slightly cool herb is also known as Thinleaf Milkwort Root, used in TCM as antibiotic property, anti-viral property(732), anti cancer(734) and anti depression(733) agents in treating hepatitis B, tumors in the digestive, respiratory systems and in the uterus, etc., as it calms the heart, transforms phlegm, resolves furuncle and oedema, expel toxin, etc. by enhancing the functions of spleen, lung and liver channels.

Phytochemicals
1. Protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK)
2. Polysaccharopeptides (PSP)
3. Tenuifolin
4. Onjisaponin B
5. Etc.

Yuan Zhi used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(719) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals in ameliorated amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits(735). In aging related dementia, based on the history of use, and pharmacological investigation, Yuan Zhi showed a strong evidence in memory improving, including cholinergic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, neurogenetic, and anti-Aβ activities(736). Palmul-chongmyeong-tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula containing Yuan zhi, exhibited improvement of learning and memory deficits, through reduction of loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity induced by cerebral ischemia(737).

1. In Alzheimer's disease (AD)
In free radical involved neuro-degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), pretreament with Paeng-Jo-Yeon-Nyeon-Baek-Ja-In-Hwan (PJBH) prescription significantly exhibited cytoprotective effects, through elevating cell survival, antioxidant enzyme activities and resulted ecreased production of malondialdehyde (MDA) associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD)(738). Smart Soup (SS), composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (AT), Poria cum RadixPini (PRP) and Radix Polygalae (RP), in oral administration of SS ameliorated the cognitive impairment of AD in animal model, effectively reduced Aβ levels, retarded Aβ amyloidosis and reduced Aβ-induced gliosis and neuronal loss(739).

2. In Parkinson's disease
Mutant Huntingtin gene caused by a poly-glutamine expansion in huntingtin( 740)and A53T α-synuclein, a protein found abundantly in the human brain, at the tips of nerve cells (neurons)(741) have shown to be associated with the development of Huntington disease and Parkinson disease. Yuan Zhi phytochemical, onjisaponin B and ethanol extracts showed to induce autophagy(743) through signalling pathway in participation of regulation of vascular function(742) in protection of cells against pro-neuro apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway(744). According to college ofPharmacy and Kyung Hee East-West Pharmaceutical Research Institute, in mouse models of Parkinson's disease, Yuan Zhi also exhibited it protective effects on dopaminergic neurons induced by toxicity(745).

3. In Huntington diseases
Mutant Hungtintin caused of degradation of long-lived cytoplasmic proteins, protein complexes (the gel-like substance enclosed within the cell membrane)(747), or damaged organelles(tiny structures that perform very specific functions within cells)(748) attenuated autophagy in association of the development of Huntington diseases(746), Onjisaponin B, found in Yuan Zhi, effectively induced autophagy through its acceleration of both the removal of mutant huntingtin and and α-synuclein in PC-12 cells(749), which contain mixture of neuroblastic cells and eosinophilic cells(750).

A.3. Radix glycyrrhizae(Gan Cao)
Gan Cao, a sweet and neutral herb, also known as Licorice root, has been used in TCM as anti allergy(752), anti inflammation(751), anti ulcer(753), anti convulsion(754) agents and to treat stomach weakness(755), tired and lack of strength(756), enhance cardiac performance(757) and short of breath(758), cough with abundance of phlegm(751), etc., as it tonifies the Spleen, benefits the Qi, moistens the Lungs, calms cough, deaf or acute pain, by enhancing the function of all 12 channels.


Phytochemicals
1. Glycyrrhizic acid
2. 24-hydroxyglycyrrhetic acid
3. Licorice saponins A3
4. Licochalcone A
5. Licochalcone B
6. Licoflavone
7. Liquiritin
8. Liquiritigenin
9. Isoliquiritigenin
10. Ononins
11. 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone
12. Etc.

Gan Cao used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(719) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to their effectiveness of phytochemicals in ameliorated amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits(759). In senile dementia, Gan Cao exhibited its elicit memory-improving effects, through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, neurogenetic, and anti-Aβ activities(760).

1. In Alzheimer's disease (AD)
Vascular risk factors (VRF) has shown strong evidence in contribution to cognitive decline and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD)(763) and dementia(761). Sini Decoction, a TCM formula containing Gan Cao enhanced cardiac function through significant suppression of lipid peroxidation(765) of myocardial homogenate(764), via scavenge oxygen free radicals activity(764). According to Korea Food Research Institute, Gan Cao attenuated the Amyloid beta protein (Abeta) involved in the progression ofAlzheimer's disease (AD), through inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase activity(762), probably via mediation antioxidant actions against oxidative stress(762).


2. In Parkinson's diseases(PD)
Kampo kami-shoyo-san (TJ-24), a Korean traditional herbal medicine, containing Gan Cao, significantly reduce tremor, disturbances in muscular movement in antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism(766). The formula also showed effectively in relieved symptoms of panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety(767). Liquiritin, a flavonoid extracted from Glycyrrhizae radix, significantly promoted the neurite outgrowth in dose dependant manners, through overexpression of neural related genes, such as neurogenin 3, neurofibromatosis 1, associated to Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease(768).

3. In learning and memory
Oral administration of Glycyrrhizae radix (GR) in rat study, showed to reduce anxiety and promote learning and memory in rats, by attenuating the behavioral and neurochemical impairments caused by repeated stress-induced alterations(770). Palmul-chongmyeong-tang, containing Gan Cao used in used as herbal medicine against ischemia, may be a potential agent for treatment of vascular dementia as it significantly improved learning and memory and attenuated cognitive impairment through reduction of the loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity in the hippocampus induced by cerebral ischemia in rat model(769).

A.4. Radix angelica sinensis(Dang Qui)
Dang Qui (Angelica sinensis), a sweet, acrid, bitter, warm herb is a GenusAngelica from the family Apiaceae, indigenous to China, used as a Queen herb in traditional Chinese medicine as antispasmodic(771), analgesic(772) and vasodilatory(772) agents, and to balance the hormones(773) in women for a normal menstrual cycle and menstruation with condition of blood stasis(774)(775) and clots(775) by strengthening heart, spleen, and liver channels. The herb is also used to treat constipation(775), reduced swelling(776), expels pus(775), etc.

Phytochemicals
1. Beta-sitosterol
2. Coumarins
3. Butylidine
4. Phthalide
5. Ligustilide
6. Sesquiterpenes
7. Carvacrol
8. B-pinene
9. Camphene,
10. P-cymene,
11. B-phellandrene
12. Myrcene
13. 6-n-butyl-cycloheptadiene-1,4, 2-methyl-dodecane-5-one,
14. Acetophenone,
15. B-bisabolene,
16. Isoacroraene,
17. Acoradiene
18. Etc.

Dang qui used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(777) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to their effectiveness of phytochemicals in ameliorated amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits(778). In aging related dementia, based on the history of use, and pharmacological investigation, dang Qui showed a strong evidence in memory improving, through iestrogen-like, cholinergic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, neurogenetic, and anti-Aβ activities(736). Palmul-chongmyeong-tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula containing dang qui, exhibited improvement of learning and memory deficits, through reduction of loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity induced by cerebral ischemia(780).

Phthalide, a phytochemical found abundantly in dang qui, also an important bio-active constituent in Si-Wu-Tang and Fo-Shou-San, showed effectively in protect neurons against ROS-induced apoptosis by modulating apoptosis-related genes(781). Z-Ligustilide (LIG), a characterized phthalide, in rat study, exhibited anti vascular dementia and cerebrovascular insufficient activities through its antioxidant effect and improved cholinergic activity(782).

1. In cognitive impairments
In patients with cognitive impairment associated with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, dang qui prevented neurotoxic effects of β-amyloid (Aβ), through its anti oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis functions(783). Its phytochemical Ligustilide (LIG), a main lipophilic component of Danggui also exhibited neuroprotective effect through anti-apoptosis of neuron and anti-proliferation of astrocyte both in cortex and in hippocampus in rat study(784).

2. Oxidative stress
Oxidative stress has been known to induced neurotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms causes of
Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA) found in dang qui, significantly suppressed Aβ aggregation and increased cellular resistance to Aβ-induced oxidative injury in the rat study(785). Coumarins, another chemical found in from Angelica, also effectively induced neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced oxidative stress causes of cognitive deficits and brain damage(786), According to Seoul National University, 4 other new dihydropyranocoumarins were isolated from Angelica gigas roots through neuroprotective activity-guided isolation and were characterized as decursinol derivatives 4"-hydroxytigloyldecursinol, 4"-hydroxydecursin, (2"S,3"S)-epoxyangeloyldecursinol, and (2"R,3"R)-epoxyangeloyldecursinol, also exhibited significant protective activity against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity(787). In transgenic mice model, traditional Chinese herbal formula Jangwonhwan (LMK03-Jangwonhwan), containing dang qui, improved cognitive impairment through detection and inhibition of AD-like pathology, such as cytotoxicity and Abeta(1-42)and Abeta(1-40) levels and beta-amyloid plaque deposition(788)

3. Behavioral and psychological symptoms
In behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia patients, combination of ferulic acid and Angelica archangelica extract oral administration, significantly attenuated neuropsychiatric symptoms in 19 of 20 patients, including delusions, hallucinations, agitation/aggression, anxiety, apathy/indifference, irritability/lability and aberrant behavior, according toNational Hospital Organization Kikuchi Hospital(789). Yokukansan, also known as TJ-54, composed of seven herbs, including dang qui, showed to inhibit a variety of effects on various neurological symptoms, such as memory disturbance and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(791) without adverse effects(790), probably through its neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity(792). In ischemic brain tissue, Z-Ligustilide (LIG), a phytochemical found in dang qui, oral administration of 10 or 40 mg/kg/day, significantly reduced malondialdehyde levels and increased superoxide dismutase activity, probably through its antioxidant effect in improved cholinergic activity(793), anti-apoptosis of neuron and anti-proliferation of astrocyte both in cortex, hippocampus(794) and ameliorated cognitive dysfunction(795) in 2VO rats study.


A.5. Radix rehmanniae(Di Huang)
Radix rehmanniae, a sweet and bitter herb, is also known as Di huang(sheng di huang is Cold in nature and shu di huang is Warm in nature), used in tradition Chinese medicine over thousand of years for treatment of the weakness caused by tuberculosis, vomiting blood, nose bleeding, coughing blood, bleeding in the uterus as its function of blood tonification, by enhancing function of heart, kidney, and liver channels(796).

Phytochemicals(797)
1. Sterol
2. Catalpol
3. Rehmanniosides A-D
4. Leonuride
5. Aucubin
6. Melittoside
7. Jioglutoside A-B, 6-O-E-feruloyl ajugol
8. Rehmaglutins A-D
9. Glutinoside, purpureaside C
10. Etc.

Di huang used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(798) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to their effectiveness of phytochemicals in ameliorated amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits(799). In senile dementia, Di huang exhibited its elicit memory-improving effects, through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, neurogenetic, and anti-Aβ activities(760).

1. Neuroprotective effects
Paeng-Jo-Yeon-Nyeon-Baek-Ja-In-Hwan (PJBH), congaing Di huang and 17 other herbs, exhibited anti lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities in decreased production of malondialdehyde (MDA) involved in neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD)(801), through cholinesterase inhibited effects(802). Other prescriptive formula, palmul-chongmyeong-tang, in ischemia-induced rats, exhibited a protective effect against ischemia-induced neuronal and cognitive impairments of learning and memory(803).

2. Psychological symptoms
Polysaccharides extracted from shudihuang (radix rehmanniae preparata) in infant male rats study, significantly inhibited MSG-induced anxiety, through its phytochemicals in down regulation of beta-synuclein, protein DJ-1, linking toneurodegeneration in patient with dementia. etc.(804).

3. Improved earning and memory
In rats damaged thalamic arcuate nucleus, shu di-huang showed to up regulate the expression of hippocampal NGF, c-fos in improving the function of learning and memory(805). In dementia model, the herb decreased the times of mistakes and prolong the incubation period in step down task, through increased expression of hippocampal receptors, involved brain memory forming, organizing, and storing(806). Other formula, such as Ba-Wei-Di-Huang decoction, also enhanced capacity for learning and memory, through expression of autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR), a multifunctional protein involved in cellular adhesion, proliferation, motility and apoptosis on animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD)(807)(808)(809).


B. In traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective(*)
Based on Chinese ancient medical records, causes of dementia are the results of (*)
B.1. Deficiency of Qi, mainly due to
B.1.1. Kidney Qi deficiency
Kidney Qi deficiency is a condition of the inability of kidney in expelling extra fluid in the body through urinary secretion via bladder. If the fluid accumulation(a) or hydration(b) occurs in the brain(a) for a prolong period of time, can induce abnormal function of neurons in information transmitting or gradual death of brain's neurons(c), leading cognitive impairment, including dementia. In elders, kidney Qi deficiency may also be related to gradual depletion of kidney essences(Jing) due to aging, according to traditional Chinese medicine.


Chinese herbs used to treat kidney Qi deficiency include
1. Lu rong(810)
Lu rong is also known as deer antler, deer antler velvet, used in traditional Chinese medicine to reduce the blockage of the meridian liver and kidney for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis(811), osteoarthritis(812), sexual function(813)(814), and sporting performance enhancement(810)(815) by enhancing the yang energy(815). Since qi deficiency is also related to blood deficiency(816), improving the body yang by strengthening the liver's function in blood formation(816) and kidney's function in fluid distribution(817), reduce the yang deficiency in the body. In neuroprotective effect, deer antler extract prevented glutamate-induced oxidative stress of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation causes of neurodegenerative disorders(832).

2. Du Zhong
Du Zhong, also known ecommia bark, is one the most used herb to enhance the function of meridian kidney-liver by promoting the qi and blood formation. The liver is a organ in charge of blood storing and blood formation(818) and kidney is in charge of fluid regulation(817).
Administration of the du zhong promotes kidney yang through action of harmony by increasing blood flow(819) and reducing fluid accumulated(820) in the body (821). In learning and memory deficits mice caused by oxidative stress, du zhong significantly improved the impairment of short-term or working memory and reversed learning and memory deficits(833), through inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in a dose-dependent manner (834) and oxidative stress causes of neuronal cell death(835)

3. Ba Ji Tian
Ba ji tian, is also known as Chinese morinda root with sweet and warm in nature, used in TCM to strengthen the liver(823), kidney qi(822) and blood yang(824) for enhancing the liver in blood formation and kidney in urinary secretion, According to Academy of Military Medical Sciences, ba ji tian showed a strong anti antidepressant activities through its phytochemicals succinic acid, nystose, 1F-fructofuranosylnystose, inulin-type hexasaccharide and heptasaccharide(836)(837).

4. Rou Chong Rong
Rou Chong Rong is also known as Herba Cistanche used in traditional Chinese medicine for reducing the blockage of kidney-large intestine meridian(825), by increasing the kidney function in fluid regulation through improved blood circulation(826), assisted urinary secretion and digestive system in moving waste. In mouse model with learning and memory deficit, rou chong rong extract increased neuronal cell differentiation, neurite length, and synapse formation in hippocampus, through nerve growth factor (NGF) biological activities, such as preventing neuronal death(838), memory loss, and increaseing long-term potentiation and learning task(839).

5. Bu Gu Zhi
Bu gu zhi is also known as psoralea fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine in treating blockage of meridian kidney-Spleen(827) by tonifying the yang(828), increasing the kidney function(829) and assisting the functions of lung qi(830) and spleen in qi distribution(831). In stem neoronal study, phytochemicals psoralen, oleanolic acid, and stilbene glucoside found in psoralea fruit exerted its anti cognitive protective effect through promoting self-renewal of neural stem cells NSCs and neuron-like differentiation(840). In rat with Huntington's disease (HD) using 3-NP induced mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured (PC12) cells, psoralea corylifolia Linn seed extracts, showed a significant protective effect against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induced cytotoxicity(841).


B.2. Heart (Yang) Qi deficiency
Heart Qi deficiency is a condition of the inability of the heart in transportation of nutrients to body organs, including the brain through blood circulation. Prolong period of malnutrition of brain cells may induce abnormal function of brain's cells in information transmitting or death of neurons, causing cognitive impairment(844), including learning and memory deficits(842), changes in brain tissue and behavior patterns(843)(842)..

Herbal medicine for Heart Qi deficiency
1. Dan shen
Dan Shen is also known as Red Sage Root with taste of the bitter and slightly cold in nature, used in TCM as antithrombotic(845), antihypertonic (lowering blood pressure)(846), antimicrobial(847), anti-inflammatory(848)(849), agents and to treat coronary and cerebrovascular disease, dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, hepatitis, hepatocirrhosis, restlessness, insomnia, irritability,(850) etc., by enhancing the functions of heart and liver channels.

Phytochemicals
1. Cryptotanshinone
2. Hydroxytanshinone,
3. Methyltanshinonate
4. Methylene tanshiquinone
5. Przewatanshinquinone A
6. Przewatanshinquinone B
7. Miltirone
8. Dihydrotanshinone I
9. Tanshinol A
10. Tanshinol B
11. Tanshinol C,
12. Nortanshinone
13. 1, 2, 15, 16-tetrahydrotanshiquinone
14. Danshensuan A, B, C
15. Protocatechuic acid,
16. Protocatechuic aldehyde
17. Etc.


1.1. Dementia
According to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, dan shen in the pharmacological effects on the central nervous system, showed to exert its neuroprotective activity through antiparkinsonian, relaxant, analgesic and memory enhancing(850). In PC12 cells, combination application of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) and Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761, effectively inhibited the formation of amyloid fibrils and protected PC12 cells(855) from beta-AP25-35-induced cytotoxicity and ROS accumulation(854).

1.2. Alzheimer's disease (AD)
Simple poly hydroxycinnamic acids and diterpenoid quinone, found in dan shen improved cognitive deficits in mice model, through protection of neuronal cells, prevention of amyloid fibril formation and preformed amyloid fibril disaggregation related to Alzheimer's disease(851). Salvianolic acid B (Sal B)isolated from dan shen, in animal model, not only prevented Abeta-induced cytotoxicity(857) but also improved cognitive deficits and protection of neuronal cells(852), through its effects on suppressing the production of ROS, calcium flux, and apoptosis(853), promoted amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism toward the non-amyloidogenic products pathway in cortical neuronal cell(856) and multifunctional machenisms(857). Compound Danshen Tablets (CDST), in rat model, exhibited spatial cognitive protection through decreased beta-APP expression in the cortex and hippocampus, detected via immunohistochemistry(859).

1.3. In learning and memory impairment
In diabetic rats model, dan shen injection improved the learning and memory decline, through upregulation of expression of MKP-1 in reduced inflammation(861) and hyperglycemia(860). HX106N, a Chimese herbal formula, containing dan shen, in Aβ25-35 peptide mice, enhanced on memory impairment and oxidative stress through increased levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)(862). In a joint study of renowned institutions, in mouse model, myelophil, a combination of extracts taken from Astragali Radix and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix, significantly exhibited its anti-amnesic properties in memory impairment, through the modulation of cholinergic activity(863). Tanshinones, a group of diterpenoids found in dan shen, also improved learning and memory impairments, through its inhibitory effect on acetylcholinesterase(864)

1.4. In neuroprotective effects
Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), one of the major active constituents of dan shen exerted its neuroprotective effects, by inhibiting transcription and translation of genes involved AD development(858). In neurotoxicity of β-amyloid protein (Aβ), contributed Alzheimer's disease (AD), dan shen extract suppressed the increased intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, through deduction of decreased the protein expression involved in the development of neurodegenerative disease, including ADs(865). According to Eur J Pharmacol and University of Sydney, salvianolic acid B (SalB) found in dan shen, in mouse model, exhibited neuroprotective effects in an amyloid β (Aβ) peptide-induced Alzheimer's disease, through its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative effects(866) and ameliorated cholinergic dysfunction- or Aβ(25-35)-induced memory impairment(867), respectively.


2. Ren shen (Ginseng)
Ren Shen is a smells aromatic, tastes sweet and slightly warm herbs, also known as Gingshen, used in TCM as improved immune system(868)(869), Anti Cancer(870)(871), Anti aging(872)(873), Anti stress(874)(875), antiErectile dysfunction(876)(877), etc. agents and to generates fluids, reduces thirst, treats symptoms of diabetes(878)(879), for xinqixu (heart qi deficient) related coronary heart disease (CHD)(880)(881), anxiety(882)(883), insomnia(884)(885), depression(886)(887), neurodegenertive disorders(888)(889)(890), bleeding in the vagina not during period(891), seizures(892)(893), chronic fatigue(894)(895), etc. as it strongly tonifies Original Qi, the Spleen and the Lungs, promotes generation of Body Fluids, calms thirst and the Mind,(896) etc. by enhancing the functions of spleen and lung channels(897).

Phytochemicals
1. Saponins
2. Panaxynol
3. Ginsenyne
4. Alpha pansinsene
5. Beta pansinsene
6. Beta farnesene
7. Bicyclogermacrene
8. Beta elemene
9. Gama elemene
10. Alpha neodovene
11. Beta neodovene
12. Alpha humulene
13. Beta humulene
14. Ccaryophyllene
15. Beta gurjunene
16. Alpha gurjunene
17. Alpha selinene
18. Beta selinene
19. Gama selinene
20. Selin-4, alpha guaiene
21. Gama cubebene
22. Beta patchoulene
23. Hepatadecanol-1
24. Etc.

Herbal ren shen used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(898) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals in ameliorated amyloid pathology(899)(900) and related cognitive deficits(901). In aging related dementia, based on the history of use, and pharmacological investigation, ren shen showed a strong evidence in cognitive improvement, through cholinesterase inhibitory activity and cholinergic function(902). According to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, combination extract of Renshen (Panax Ginseng), Yinyanghuo (Herba Epimedii Brevicornus), Yuanzhi (Radix Palygalae) and Jianghuang (Rhizoma Curcumae Longae) (GEPT) exhibited neuroprotecting mechanism for preventing and treating of AD(903).

2.1. In Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is a brain disorder named after German physician Alois Alzheimer. The disease destroys brain cells involved inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction or oxidative stress(904), causing problems with thinking and behavior severe(904) enough to affect language communication(905), memory(906), lifelong hobbies or social life(907).
Ginseng extracts, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients significantly attenuated amyloid plaque deposition in short- and long-term memory impairment. through its phytochemical gintonin effect via the mediation in promotion of non-amyloidogenic processing(908). In amyloid β peptide induced AD cell model, ginsenoside Rg1, the main chemical constituent of ginseng, improved the memory impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), through suppressing the signaling transduction pathways and decreasing the inflammation factors(909)(910); increasing cell viability, reducing oxidative damage (including apoptosis), restoring mitochondrial membrane potential(911). According to the join 17-months old male APP/PS1 mice study by University of Michigan and Yunnan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, total saponin in leaves of Panax notoginseng (LPNS) attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and cell death in brain cells through activation of Nrf2 (nuclear translocation) and upregulation of downstream antioxidant systems(912).
Unfortunately, according to the review over 20 databases from the inception to January 2009 and included all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) from Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, the use of ginseng for treatments of Alzheimer's disease is scarce and inconclusive(913).

2.2. In Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system, affecting movement of muscles(917)(918), speech(919), poster, balance, auto functioning(920), etc., with disease's symptoms worsen over time. According to a multicenter study, phosphorylated forms, pS129 is associated to the severity and progression of Parkinson diseases(914). NFE2L2 gene, an important regulator of the cellular protection against oxidative stress, if defects can contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease(915)(916). In the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), Ginsenoside Rb, effectively inhibited or reversed the aggregation process and may represent a viable therapeutic strategy against PD and related disorders, through anti-amyloidogenic and antineurotoxical effects(921). Its water extract in induced cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, also exhibited significant protective effects possibly through the suppression of ROS generation(922). According to Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, use of ginseng and other herbs, such as eleutherococcus, Rhodiola rosea, etc., in a complex therapy for Parkinson's disease, may be due to theirs normalized immune, antioxidant, and hormonal parameters(923).
In Huntington's disease, Ginsenosides, the main chemical constituents of ginseng, showed to exert its neuroprotective effect against neurons from glutamate-induced apoptosis in vitro(924).

2.3. In cognitive impairment
Klotho Gene Deficiency has been found to associate with oxidative stress related cognitive impairment(925). In aging mice model, ginseng exhibited anti oxidative stress in ameliorated lipid peroxidation, restored antioxidant capacity(926), and reduced accumulation of intercellular messenger, nitric oxide (NO)(927) activities, may be used as a potential treatment of herbal medicine for cognitive impairment(927). Ginsenoside Rb1, a major chemical constituent found in ginseng, showed to inhibit cognitive impairment caused by diabetes, through GSK3β, (a negative regulator in the hormonal control of glucose homeostasis)-mediated endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress due tophysiological and pathological insults, in high glucose-treated hippocampal neurons(928).

2.4. In neuroprotective effects
In high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons, Ginsenoside Rb1 exerted a wide variety of neuroprotective effects by inhibiting CHOP signaling pathway involved in apoptosis signal in ER stress- and CHOP-mediated apoptosis(940), oxidative stress(926), mitochondrial dysfunction(929)(941) and neuroinflammation(941). According to University Complutense of Madrid, Ginseng and its major constituents as potential neuroprotective agents against progression of Parkinson's disease(943), may be due to its effectiveness in inhibition of oxidative stress(926), neuroinflammation(941), toxins-induced apoptosis(944) and regulation of channels and receptors activity(945)(942).


3. Xi yang shen(946), Yin in nature, the sweet, slightly bitter, cool herb has been used in TCM to treat fatigue(947)(948), diabetes(949), cardiovascular diseases(950)(951) and atopic diseases(952), promote saliva, quench thirst(949)(950), due to yang deficiency of lungs, by enhancing the lung and spleen qi, through increasing the digestive system in absorbing vital energy and reducing the heat causes of qi stagnation through Heart, Lung, Kidney channels.

Phytochemicals
1. Resin
2. Pinene
3. α Phellandrene
4. β Phellandrene
5. α-amyrone,
6. α-amyrinone
7. α-amyrin
8. β-amyrin
8. Viridiflorol
9. Insensole
10. Insensole oxide
11. Ginseng Saponins: ginsenoside -R0, -Rb1, -Rb2, -Rb3, -Rc, -Rd, -Re, -Rf, -Rg1, -Rg2, -Rg3, -Rh1, -RA0, quinquenoside R1, gypenoside X1, F3, F11.
12. Etc.

Herbal xi yang shen used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(953) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals in ameliorated amyloid pathology(953) causes of neuro cells apoptosis(954) and related cognitive deficits(955).

3.1. In Alzheimer's disease
In Alzheimer's disease cell model, induced by Abeta25-35, water extracts ofAmerican Ginseng (WEAG), exerted neuroprotective effects of SH-SY5, a human derived cell line against cells apoptosi(954). Pseudoginsenoside-F11 (PF11), a main component found in American ginseng, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice model, induced by scopolamine, morphine and methamphetamine, significantly mitigated learning and memory impairment in 15 days, through inhibited the expressions of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ1-40 in the cortex and hippocampus, restored the activities of antioxidants in decreased the production of malondialdehyde (MDA), a indicators of lipid peroxidation (953).

3.2. In Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease
In neurodegeneration-like Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease rat model, induced by 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). preparation of American ginseng leaves and stems significantly reduced brain degeneration through its active phytochemicals, ginsenosides, Rb1, Rb3 and Rd(958), according to Baylor College of Medicine and Austin State University(957). Ginsengsaponins, an active ingredients found in ginseng species, including American ginseng also exerted beneficial effects on aging, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases through mediated protective mechanisms, including attenuated free radicals(959)(960).

3.3. In Neuroprotective effects
Pseudoginsenoside-F11 (PF11), a phytochemical of Panax quinquefolism (American ginseng) showed to exhibit its neuroprotective effect against impraired locomotor(962) on methamphetamine (MA)-induced behavioral and neurochemical toxicities in mice(964) and in Parkinson's disease (PD) of rat model, by evoked neuronal excitability and mediated the increased release of glutamate(962), motor balance, coordination, and apomorphine-induced rotation, through inhibiting free radical formation and stimulating endogenous antioxidant release(961). According to the State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology, water extracts of American Ginseng(WEAG) also exerted its neuroprotective effect on SH-SY5Y cells apoptosis induced by Abeta25-35, in Alzheimer's Disease cellular model(963).

3.4. In Cognitive impairment
Amyloid β (Aβ) accumulation, elevated oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the neurons have shown to induce the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Pseudoginsenoside-F11 (PF11) found abundantly in American ginseng, exhibited recognitive improvement effect in mouse model, through its antioxidant status in inhibition of amyloidogenesis and oxidative stress and enhancement of neuronal functions(965) as well as ameliorated cognitiveimpairment, neuroinflammation, and biochemical alterations caused by accumulation of intercellular messenger, nitric oxide (NO)(966).

4. Sang shen also known as Mulberry or Morus Fruit, the sweet, sour and cold herb has been used in TCM as antioxidant(968)(969), antiinflammatory(969), anti ageing(991) and neuroprotective(968)(970) agents and to treat vertigo, tinnitus, insomnia, atherosclerosis(971)(973), vascular smooth muscle cells(972), lipid accumulation(974), weak digestion, premature white hair, thirst(967), diabetes(967), diarrhea, etc., as it nourishes Yin, and Blood, promotes generation of Body Fluid, moistens the Intestines, etc. by enhancing the functions of heart, liver and kidney channels(975).

Phytochemicals
1. Resveratrol
2. Anthocyanosides
3. Carotene
4. Thiamine
5. Ribflavin
6. Vtamin C
7. Vannin
8. Linoleic acid
9. Stearic acid
10. Etc.

Herbal sang shen used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(977) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals in exertion of its neuroprotective effects(968)(970) through anti oxidative stress(968)(969), anti inflammatory(969) and anti excitotoxic (involved Alzheimer's disease) mechanisms(978) against cell membrane damage and mitochondrial function induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and glutamate-induced cell death(977).

1. In aging Alzheimer's disease(ADs)
Decreased the levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase caused by oxidative stress(979), alanine aminotransferase(980), triglyceride(981) and total cholesterol(982) due to ageing have shown to involve in the development of Alzheimer's disease. In ageing animals, mulberry extracts (ME), rich in phenolics and anthocyanins, significantly demonstrated less amyloid beta protein and improved learning and memory ability through its antioxidant enzymes and reduction of oxidative damage(983).
Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G) fraction extracted from sang shen effectively protected primary cortical neurons in 7 days, against glutamate-induced cell death cause of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease(ADs(978) in rat model(984).

2. In Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease (PD), is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders as results of dopaminergic deafferentation of the basal ganglia)(985) and oxidative stress(986)(987).
According to Kyung Hee University, 70 % ethanol extract of mulberry fruit(ME), in dose-dependent manner, in vitro and in vivo PD models showed to prevent 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage(999), through its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects, in regulating reactive oxygen species and NO generation(988).

3. Neuroprotective effects
Cyanidin-3-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (C3G) found abundantly in the mulberry fruits exerted significantly exhibited its cytoprotective effect on PC12 cells(derived from a pheochromocytoma of the rat adrenal medulla) under oxidative stress induced neuro-degenerative diseases(983)(989). In neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, caused by cerebral ischemia, mulberry leaves (ML) exhibited neuroprotectiveactions in reduced the cytotoxicity in the PC12 cells against oxygen glucose deprivation with enhanced accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(990).

4. In memory improvement
In mice model, mulberry fruits extract, significantly increased pre- and post-synapse formation(992), acetylcholine synthesisation(993), neuronal cell differentiation(994), neurite outgrowth(995) and neuronal cell proliferation(996) in the hippocampus, against loss of memory through its antioxidant in protecting or enhanced neuronal functions mediated by neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF)(991). According to National Chung Hsing University, in memory deterioration in ageing animals, phenolics and anthocyanins, from mulberry fruits, inhibited amyloid beta protein(998) and improved learning and memory ability through induced higher antioxidant enzyme activity and less lipid oxidation in both the brainand liver(997).


B.3.3. Spleen Qi deficiency
Spleen is a vital organ, according to traditional Chinese medicine, with function in absoring nutrients and transporting them to body's organs and cells. Spleen Qi deficiency is a condition of the inability of the spleen in maximized transportation of nutrients to body organs, including the brain. Prolong period of malnutrition of brain cells may induce abnormal functions in information transmitting or death of neurons, causing cognitive impairment(844), including learning and memory deficits(842) and changes in brain tissues and behavior patterns(843)(842).

Herbal medicine for Spleen Qi deficiency
1. Peony (Chi Shao)
Chi Shao or Chi Shao Yao with bitter, sour taste and cool in nature is also known as Peony Root, used in TCM as antispasmodic(1000)(1001), anti-inflammatory(1002)(1003), anti allergic(1004) antibiotic(1005), anticonvulsant(1006), analgesic(1007), anxiolytic(1008) agents and to lower blood pressure(1009), dilate peripheral blood vessels, coronary arteries against heart attack(1010), treat viral hepatitis(1011), chronic constipation(1012), asthma(1013), whooping cough(1014), diabetes(1015)(1016), etc., as it clears heat, cools blood, eliminates blood accumulation, calms paindilates, etc., by enhancing the functions of liver and spleen channels(1017).
Phytochemicals
1. Essential oil
2. Resin
3. Paeoniflorin
4. Paeonol
5. Paeonin
6. Albiflorin
7. Triterpenoids
8. Sistosterol
9. Oxypaeoniflorin
10. Benzoylpaeoniflorin
11. Benzoic acid
12. β sitosterol
13. Gallotannin
14. Pedunculagin
15. 1-O-Galloylpedunculagin
16. Eugeniin
17. Tannin acid
18. Etc.

Herbal shao yao used in traditional Chinese medicine for treatment and prevention of dementia(1018)(1019), may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals, including major constituent paeoniflorin, in exertion of its neuroprotective effects(1020)(1021) through anti oxidative stress(1022), anti inflammatory(1023), improved neural synapse plasticity(1024) mechanisms, against β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation(1025) induced senile dementia and aging-induced cognitive dysfunction(1026).

1.1. Parkinson's disease PD
Strong evidences suggested that peony, possesses wide pharmacological effects in nervous system(1027)(1028). Paeoniflorin, a phytochemical isolated from peony, in PC12 cells induced by 6-OHDA found in patient with Parkinson's disease(1030), showed to suppress mitochondria apoptosis, through its antioxidant capability in increasing glutathione (GSH)(1032), by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS)(1031). In Parkinson's disease (PD) progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons involved movement and in mouse model with mitochondrial dysfunction, peony significantly inhibited mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, via the regulation of expression of immunity, inhibition of cytochrome C associated with the inner membrane of the mitochondrion. release and caspase-3, a protein encoded by in CASP3gene, activation(1031). According to University of Miami, polyphenols of bai shao, included baicalin, baicalein, wogonin (in scutellaria) paeonol, paeonoside, and paeoniflori, exerted neuroprotective efficacy, probably through improving cerebral blood circulation, involved alleviation of the symptoms of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) andParkinson's disease (PD)(1033).

1.2. In Alzheimer's disease AD
Abeta42 deposition in hippocampus has shown to induce brain inflammation causes of early onset of Alzheimer's disease AD(1034)(1035). Paeonol(2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyacetophenone;1-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)ethan-1-one), found in peony, not only protected the nervous system against accumulation of amyloid peptide, Aβ1-42, through its anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging properties, but also slowed down and regulated the pathogenic processes associated with AD, through morphological, biochemical and behavioral activities(1036). Aqueous extract of the dry root ofPeony in Abeta((1-42))-induced rats, also inhibited Abeta-induced neurotoxicity, through ameliorated cognitive deficit, cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manner(1037).

1.3. In cognitive impairment
Cognitive impairment is common in patients with the neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD, Paeoniflorin, isolated from the aqueous extract of peony, in rat model, not only showed to promote the cognitive ability, exhibited anti-depressant-like effect and reduced toxicity, but also attenuated the oxidative stress induced Aβ(1-42) by regulating choline acetyltrasferase and the activity of acetylcholine esterase in the hippocampus of Aβ(1-42)(1038)(1039). In Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, associated with the cognitive deficits of AD, the phytochemical also attenuated cognitive deficit and brain damage through ameliorated astrocytes(star-shaped glial cells in CNS) and microglias(glial cell in CNS) in hippocampus(1040). According to Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, on cerebral infarction induced neurological symptoms, paeoniflorin (PF) significantly reduced the infarct volume causes of cognitive impairment(1041).

1.4. In learning and memory
Supplementation of paeonol extracted from peony, in d-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging mice, significantly improved the learning and memory ability through reduction of oxidative stress, cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity, according to China Pharmaceutical University(1042). Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS), the herbal formula containing peony and 5 other herbs, used to treat gynecological disorders and neural dysfunctions, in the same model study, showed effectively in improved cognitive ability, through ameliorating oxidative stress induced neuronal apoptosis in the brain(1043). Paeoniflorin, a major constituent of peony, also exhibited its beneficial effect on learning and memory impairment in rodents, by reversed the suppressible effects of adenosine as shown on passive avoidance test and inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP)(1044).

2. Bupleurum
Chai Hu, the bitter, slightly cold herb is also known as bupleurum root, used in TCM as antitrypanosomal, antimicrobial and antiviral, such as cold and influenza, alternated chill and fever, malaria(1047), cytotoxic(1045) and anti-cancer agents(1046) and to treat irregular menses, prolapse of uterus and rectum(1048), etc., as it regulates and clears heat, improves liver function, raises Yang(1048) and resolves depression and stagnation, etc. by enhancing the functions of liver, gall bladder, pericardium, triple burner channels.

Phytochemicals
1. β-terpinene
2. imonene
3. β-fenchene
4. ulegone
5. Isoborneol
6. β-terpineol
7. α-copaene
8. Humulene
9. A-farnesene10. Aromadendrene
11. Cis-caryophyllene
12. β-elemene,13. Gamma-muurolene
14. Patchoulane
15. Pootkatone
16. Ledol
17. Etc.

Herbal chai hu used in the treatment and prevention of dementia(1049)(1050) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals in exertion of its neuroprotective effects(1051) through its cytoprotection of neuron, and neuroprotective mechanisms(1052), against apoptosis of neurons(1051) due to Aβ oligomer-induced neuronal damage(1060) in concentration of corticosterone on hippocampal neurons(1059) in a dose-dependent manner.
Yokukansan, a popular herbal combination in Japan and China, containing chai hu, may be the next potential herbal formula used for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, Parkinson's disease, especially for the behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia BPSD)(1064)(1065)(1066).

2.1. In dementia symptoms
In dementia, Yokukansan, also known as TJ-54, composed of sev Angelica acutiloba, Atractylodes lancea, Bupleurum falcatum, Poria cocos, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Cnidium officinale and Uncaria rhynchophylla,(1052)showed to ameliorate the memory disturbance, anxiety-like behavior, aggressive behaviors, decrease in social behaviors, learning deficits and non-cognitive defects(1055) through improvement of neuronal and astroglial cells, via inhibit glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity(1053)(1054). According to 1KeimeiMemorial Hospital in Japan, the formula also showed to improve behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) together with donepezil in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD)(1056).

2.2. In Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies
In Alzheimer's disease, Yokukansan improved psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)(1058), such as hallucinations, agitation, anxiety, irritability or abnormal behavior(1057) in elderly patients1056). In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, Kampo medicine, yokukansan (YKS), including chai hu, also improved behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), through neuropsychiatric Inventory scores(1061).

2.3. In Parkinson's disease
In neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease, yokukansan, containing Chai hu, using the Unified PD Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III) and Hoehn and Yahr scale, showed effectively in ameliorated symptoms of delusions, agitation, depression, euphoria, disinhibition with aberrant motor activity but irritability(1062). In behavioral and psychological symptoms, the herbal formula, also exhibited improvements of these symptoms, without worsening cognitive function, ability to perform activities of daily living, or parkinsonism, after 4 weeks(1063). Yokukansankachimpihange, another formula containing chai hu, showed to exhibit anti hallucinate effects, through its major phytochemical atractylenolide III and β-eudesmol, via its antagonistic activity against serotonin receptors induced non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease and various forms of dementias(1067).

According to traditional Chinese medicine, the effectiveness of a herbal formula, is not results of single ingredient or single herb itself, but the combination of all ingredients of all herbs in the formula, even some herbs in the formula may show significant efficacies in Western studies and clinical trials.


3. Safflower (Hong Hua)
Safflower, is an acrid, warm herb in nature, used in tradition Chinese medicine as anti-bacterial(1070), anti viral(1068)(1069), analgesic(1071), diabetic(1072)(1073), immune stimulant(1074), anti-inflammatory(1071), anti-spasmodic(1075) agents. As a blood tonic in Chinese medicine, the herb is effective in treating dysmenorrhea(1075), amenorrhea(1075), by breaking up blood stagnation|(1077)(11078), improving blood flow(15) through warm-pungent-liver efficiency network(1079) and regulation of female reproductivehormone(1080) via liver, heart channels(1076).

Phytochemicals
1. Neocarthamin
2. Carthamin
3. Carthamone
4. Carthamidin
5. Saffloryellow
6. Saffloryellow-A
7. Apalmitic acid
8. Myristic acid
9. Lauric acid
10. Etc.

Herbal Safflower (Hong Hua) used in the treatment of symptoms of degenerative diseases(1091) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals, including major constituent hydroxy-safflor yellow A(1081)baicalin, baicalein, wogonin(1088), in exertion of its neuroprotective effects(1082)(1083), through anti oxidative stress(1086), anti inflammatory(1084))(1085) activities, against β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation(1081) induced neurotoxicity causes of Alzheimer's disease.(1087)(1089) and neurodegeneration(1090).

3.1. In Alzheimer's disease
Neuroinflammation has shown to be a major contribution to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD)(1092). Hydroxy-safflor yellow A (HSYA), isolated from safflower, inhibited Aβ 1-43₁ induced inflammation(1096) through anti microglia-mediated neurotoxicity activity(1094). In PC12 cells induced by β-amyloid neurotoxicity, the phytochemical also inhibited cell viability, glutathione level, through ameliorated enzymes found extensively in body tissues, formation of DNA fragmentation, levels of reactive oxygen species(1095) and reduced pro-inflammatory mediators(1097).


3.2. In Neuroprotective effects(1098)
Hydroxy-safflor yellow A (HSYA) at the molecular level, showed to inhibite energy metabolism disruption, excitatory amino acid toxicity, oxidative stress caused by impaired metabolism in rats with ischemia, through suppressing proinflammatory and upregulating anti-inflammatory mechanism(1099). According to Tianjin Medical University General Hospita, the herb also exerted its neuroprotective effects by inhibiting the accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), a major protein component of senile plaques induced neurotoxicity via decreased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species(1101), ROS marker, malondialdehyde, and increased the level of glutathione, stabilized mitochondrial membrane(1100) and protected against excitotoxic neuronal death(1102).

3.3. In memory dysfunction
Intake of safflower oil has shown to improve learning and memory ability in n-3 fatty acid deficient male mice(1103) and in an age-related neuro deteriorative mouse model(1106), probably through modulated physiological properties of entorhinal cortex neurons(1104) and the balance of ratio of brain phospholipid(1107), respectively. Nicotiflorin, a natural flavonoid extracted from safflower, in cerebral multi-infarct dementia in rats model, showed to enhance spatial memory through reducd ROS production(1105).

4. Cinnamon bark (Rou gui)
Rou gui, an acrid, sweet, very hot herb, is also known as Cinnamon bark, used in TCM as anti-spasmodic(1110), antibiotic(1111), antigastric ulcers(1112), anti impotent and anti diabetic(1113)(1114) agents and to treat hepatitis(1115), flatulence(1116), weak digestion(1116), pain in solar plexus(1110), breast cancer(1117)(1118), tuberculosis(1119)(1120), etc., as it drains the liver heat, eliminates Qi accumulation, disperses nodules, reduces stagnation, etc.by enhancing the functions of heart, lung, bladder channels(1121).

Ingredients
1. Cinnamic aldehyde
2. Cinnamyl acetate
3. Eugenol
4. Aldehyde
5. Pinene
6. Coumarin
7. Cinnamyl alcohol
8. Cinnamic acid
9. Cinnzeylanol
10. Cinnzeylanine
11. Etc.

Cinnamon bark (Rou gui) used in the treatment of symptoms of neurological impairment(1108)(1109) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals, including major constituent cinnamaldehyde (CA) and epicatechin (EC)(1122) in exertion of its neuroprotective effects(1123)(1123), through anti oxidative stress(1125), anti inflammatory(1124)) activities, against β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation(1126) induced neurotoxicity causes of Alzheimer's disease.(1126)(1127) and neurodegeneration(1128).

4.1. In Alzheimer's disease
Cinnamon, a multifaceted medicinal plant have shown to consist activities against neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's diseases(1129) by blocking and reversing tau modification and aggregation(1131)(1130) and ischemic stroke induced cell swelling(1130). In β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ), associated to the development of Alzheimer's disease(AD) mouses model, oral administration of cinnamon extract exhibited neuroroprotective effects in enhancing the fully recover of locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain(1132). In a high fat/high fructose diet induced Alzheimer's disease(AD) symptoms, cinnamon (CN) ameliorated enzyme phosphatase and proteins tensin homolog (PTEN), tau and amyloid precursor, associated to Alzheimer's disease(AD), through improved insulin sensitivity and related changes in the brain(1133).
According to The Business and Technology Center, West Lafayette, Chinesecinnamon, is one of the tested herb with potential for prevention and treatment of early onset of Alzheimer's disease(AD)(1134).

4.2. In Parkinson's disease
In a mice model, oral administration of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder upregulaed and/or maintained the level of Parkin/DJ-1, a beneficial proteins associated to degeneration progression of Parkinson's disease(1135). through protection of dopaminergic neurons(1136). In oligomeriztion of α-synuclein (α-syn) formation associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, cinnamon extract precipitation (CEppt), inhibited oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-syn through ameliorated aggregation of β-amyloid polypeptide(1137).

4.3. In neuroprotective effects
Oxidative stress has shown to associate to brain damage due to its high consumption of oxygen.
Cinnamon polyphenols, during oxidative stress, exhibited neuroprotective effects in glial cells by reduced overexpression of the proinflammatory factors(1138) and enhanced prosurvival proteins protein levels (sirtuin 1, 2, and 3, deacetylases) associated to glioma cells survival(1139). Cinnamaldehyde, a major chemical found in cinnamon, inhibited uncontrolled activation of microglia contributing to neuroinflammation involved in the development of neurodegenerative diseases(1140). The herbal water extract, also exerted neuro protective effect against glutamate-induced neuronal death through the inhibition of Ca(2+) influx(1141).

B.4. Dementia due to Blood Stasis
According to Chinese medical literaure over 3000 years of history, blood stasis may be caused by spleen qi deficiency, but in most cases, it is due to heart qi deficiency cause of inability in transport nutrients to the body organs and cells, including the brain. Prolong period of malnutrition of brain cells may induce abnormal function of brain's cells in information transmitting or death of neurons, cognitive impairments(844), including learning and memory deficits(842) and changes in brain tissues and behavior patterns(843)(842). Blood statsis induced by cold(1142), emotional disorder(1143), aging(1144),chronic illnesses and consumptive disease(1145), can overload the heart capacity, contributing to long-term hypertension(1146) due to decreased or impeded blood flow(1147) causes of hypo-perfusion in cerebral blood flow or acute focal stroke in memory-related cerebral parenchyma induced progression of cognitive decline(*).

Herbal medicine for treatment of Blood stasis
1. Wolfberry (Gou qi)
Gou Qi, the sweet and neutral herb is also known as wolfberry, used in TCM as anti cancers(1148)(1149), antioxidative(1150)(1151) and anti aging(1156)(1157) agent and to treat back, leg, and stomach pain(1152), hypopigmentation(1154), improve vision(1153)(1154), diabetes(1155), premature aging(1156), enhance immune system(1157), lower blood lipids(1158), elevate level of testosterone(1159), simulate estrogen and anti estrogen effect through different estrogen receptor mechanisms(1160) etc., as it nourishes and tonifies Liver and Kidneys, moistens the Lungs, etc., by enhancing the functions of liver, lung and kidney channels(1161).

Phytochemicals
1. Betaine
2. β-sitosterol
3. Linoleic acid
4. Physalien
5. Cryptoxanthin
6. Atropine
7. Hyoscyamine
8. Scopoletin
9. Amino acids
10. Physalein
11. Zeaxanthin
12. Dipalmitate
13. Carotene
14. Etc.

1.1. In Alzheimer's disease(AD)
Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels have shown to associate to increased the risk of Alzheime's disease (AD), epidemiologically and clinically. Polysaccharides, phytochemicals derived from wolfberry (LBA) not only inhibited Abeta accumulation but also reduced risk of other factors induced AD(1162). According to the University of Hong Kong, the chemical olysaccharides, also ameliorated glutamate excitotoxicity involved in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD)(1163). The herbal alkaline extract was found to exhibit neuroprotection, through inhibiting Abeta-peptides induced apoptosis and neuronal cell death(1164).

1.2. In neuroprotective effects
Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP), on focal cerebral ischemic injury in mice model, inhibited neuronal morphological damage and attenuated the neuronal apoptosis through mitochondrial apoptosis pathway(1165). In ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage, chemical Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP), reduced apoptosis and decreasednumber of viable cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), through its antioxidant activity(1166), In PC12 cell, Lycium arbarum extracts inhibited neurotoxin induced Parkinson's disease-like syndrome, through increased intracellular Ca (2+) level and significantly cell viability and cellular ATP levels(1167).

1.3. In cognitive impairment
In prenatal stress-induced cognitive impairment of offspring rats, Lyciumbarbarum showed to inhibit brain oxidative mitochondrial damage andcognitive dysfunction, through its scavenged hydroxyl and superoxide radicals(1168). Kyung-Ok-Ko (KOK), a traditional herbal prescription, containing Lycium, showed to enhance neuroprotective effects in attenuation of memory impairment, probably through its anti-inflammatory activities(1169).

1.4. In learning and memory
Lycium barbarum polysaccharides, scopolamine (SCO-induced cognitive and memory deficits in rats model, ameliorated and suppressed oxidative stress in hippocampus, and neurons apoptosis(1170). On transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, Gou qi extracts at 10 mg/kg improved the performance of the learning and the memory in rieval phases of tested models, through reduced levels of Aβ(1-42) in hippocampal tissue(1171). According toKyung Hee University, Lycium chinense fruit, in trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neuronal and cognitive impairment rats model, improved learning and memory deficit in impaired learning and memory scores(1172).


2. Polygonum multiflorum (he shou wu)
He Shu Wu or Ye Jiao Teng or Shu Wu is also known as Fleece flower root or Fo-ti.
a. The prepared herb is astringent with some sweetness, mildly warm
b. The raw herb is bitter, sweet and neutral
used in TCM to treatment of hyperlipemia(1173), neurasthenia(1174), split personality(1174), promoted hair grown(1175) and prevent hair loss(1176) due to aging, skin rash due to inflammation(1177), etc., as it tonifies and benefits the essence and blood, expels toxins, moistens the intestines, etc. by enhancing the (The prepared herb) liver and kidney channels and (The raw herb) liver, heart and large intestine channels(1178).

Phytochemicals
1. Polygoacetophenoside
2. Chrysophanol
3. Emodin
4. Rhein
5. Emodin-6
6. Physcion
7. Chrysophanic acid
8. Anthrone
9. beta-sitosterol
10. 2,3,5,4′-tetrahydroxystibene-2O-b-D-glucoside
11. Quercetin-3-O-galactoside
12. Querctin-3-O-arabinoside
13. Lecithin
14. Etc.

2.1. In Alzheimer's disease
Polygonum multiflorum extract, significantly improved AD patients with total effective rate of 93.33% in clinical trial, according to Third XiangyaHospital(1179). In rat model, induced Alzheimer's disease by injecting Abeta 1-40, the herb exhibited improvement of learning and memory ability, through expression of the fluidity of mitochondria membrane and the activity of mitochondrial COX(1180) and ameliorated hippocampal synapses count and synaptophysin expression(1181). In cognitive deficits induced by Abeta25-35,Polygonum multiflorum water extract, also significantly ameliorated the cognitive deficits, probably due to its antioxidant properties(1182).

2.2. In Parkinson disease
Strong evidences suggested that agricultural chemicals and environment toxins, such as dithiocarbamate fungicides, impacted dopamine systems has shown to associate to the development of Parkinson's disease,(1184)(1185). In nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration induced by paraquat and maneb in mice model, ethanol-soluble PME (PME-I) water extracts from Polygonum multiflorum, improved locomotor activity, motor incoordination, and declines of dopamine level, probably through phytochemicals, in the ethanol-soluble fraction(1183).

2.3. In neuroprotective effects
In focal cerebral ischemia mice, hexane extracts of Polygonum multiflorum, exhibited its neuroprotective effects though significantly decreased infarct size and improved neurological and motor function, (1186) and attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner and prevented apoptosis of cortical neurons(1187), in HT22 hippocampal cells(1188), probably through it antioxidant activity. According to Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) extract from Polygonum multiflorum, also improved mitochondrial function, decreased oxidative stress and inhibited apoptosis against induced cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells(1188).

2.4. In learning and memory
Dietary supplementation with either ethanol or water extracts of Polygonummultiflorum have shown to reduce brain pathological changes and promote learning and memory ability(1191)(1192). In male Sprague-Dawley rats, injected with beta amyloid (Aβ), tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, an active chemical constituent of extract from Polygonum multiflorum, significantly improved the learning and memory, through protecting synaptic structure and function(1189) and learning and/or memory ability of aged rats by increasedBeta-secretase 1 (BACE1), a beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 and decreased ADAM10 (metallopeptidase domain 10), a protein associated to the development of Alzheimer's disease(1190).

B.5. According to TCM philosophy, dementia is also to be induced by the combination/or of Kidney essence vacuity and toxin (turbid phlegm).
C.5.1. Dementia due to toxins accumulation
Toxins accumulation in internal organs disturbed the balance of immunity(1213)(1214) may cause impairment of food intake regulation(1215), exhibition of phlegm(1208)(1208)(1210), retention of fluid(1211)(1212) and blood statsis(1209) induced early the onset of dementia, in aging population with depletion of kidney-essence(1208)(1209), according to traditional Chinese medicine.

Chinese Herbal medicine for toxins elimination
1. Shui Fei Zi or Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)
Shui fei zi, the bitter and cold herb, is also known as milk thistle, native to Western Europe and northern Africa, used in traditional Chinese medicine to improve liver function(1193)(1194)(1210), promote the flow of breast milk(1207), bile secretion(1200), anti depression(1201) and anti tumors(1196)(1197)(1198), inhibit allergic effects(1195)(1199), treat hepatitis C(1202)(1203), cirrhosis(1205) and liver fibrosis(1206), by enhancing function of liver and gallbladder channels(1204)

Phytochemicals
1. Flavonoid
2. Fumaric acid
3. Silymarin
4. Isosilybin,
5. Dehydrosilybin,
6. Silydianin
7. Silychristin
8. Cinnamic acid
9. Myristic acid
10. Palmitelaidic acid
10. Arachidic acid
11. Etc.

Shui Fei Zi or Milk thistle used in the treatment and prevention ofdementia(1218) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals Silymarin and Silibinin in ameliorated amyloid pathology(1216) and oxidative stress(1216)(1217) through attenuated levels of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) and antioxidant (glutathione) in the hippocampus(1217).

1.1. In Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer disease (AD). a neurodegenerative disorders is the most prevalent diseases in the United States, in aging population(1219). Silymarin, a phytochemical found abundantly in milk thistle, in age related disorders like neurodegenerative diseases improved locomotion rate, higher response to stimuli and tolerance to stress, in C.elegans Alzheimer's Model, through delayed paralysis via enhanced resistance to oxidative stress(1220). In rat induced Alzheimer's disease model, the phytochemical also inhibited amyloid formation(1222) and suppressed amyloid protein precursor (APP) expression(1222)and reduced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells(1222) in improvement memory(1223) and learning function(1221).

1.2. In Parkinson disease
In a mouse model of Parkinson's disease, causes of mitochondrial dysfunction and selective cells death of dopaminergic neurons, silibinin, derivative of silymarin, protected mitochondria through attenuated motor deficit and dopaminergic neuronal loss(1224) and anti oxidative and anti inflammatory pathways(1225).

1.3. In neuroprotective effects
In focal cerebral ischemia, silymarin (SM), a mixture of flavonolignans extracted from the milk thistle exerted it neuroprotective effects, in upregulating the antioxidant status and lowering the apoptotic response in slowing down the progression of neurodegeneration(1226) and preventing inflammation-related neurodegenerative disease(1227) and ROS causs of oxidative damage to macromolecules in the brain(1230).

1.4. In cognitive impairment
In cognitive deficit mice model, silibinin exhibited its anti cognitive impairment effects through amelioration of decreases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, (1228). In amyloid beta peptide-induced memory impairment, the chemicals also improved cognitive memory deficits through attenuated the Abeta(25-35)- accumulation of malondialdehyde and depletion of glutathione in the hippocampus(1229).


2. Xiu Hui Xiang (Fennel)
Xiu Hui Xiang, the acrid and warm herb, is also known as fennel, native to Mediterranean, used in traditional Chinese medicine as anti microbal(1232)(1233), antioxidant(1234)(1235), emmenagogue(1236), estrogenic(1244) and androgenic(1245) agents and to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal osteoporosis(1237)(1238), treat hepatic fibrosis(1239), gastro intestine disorder(1240)(1241), decrease hair thickness(1243) and increase flow of breast milk(1242) by enhancing function of liver, kidney, spleen, stomach channels(1231).

Phytoshemicals
1. Linoleic acid
2. Palmitic acid
3. Arachidic acid
4. Behenic acid
5. Quercetin
6. Phytosteryl b-fructofuranoside
7. 7-hydroxycoumarin
8. 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin
9. Oleanolic acid
10. Sitosterol
11. Fenchone
12. α-pinene
13. Limonene
14. β-Pinene
15. β-Myrcene
16. α-Phellandrene
17. P-Cymol
18. Etc.


Xiu Hui Xiang (Fennel) used in the treatment of symptoms of neurodegenerative disorder, including age-related mental problems of Alzheimer's disease(1246)) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals in acetylcholinesterase inhibition(1246) and anti inflammation(1247) through suppression of the nuclear factor-kappaB activation pathway(1247) involved stress, cell signaling, free radicals, oxidized LDL activities(1248)(1249)(1250)(1251).

2.1. In anxiolytic activity
Anxiety is a condition of neurodisorder of unpleasant state of inner turmoil with fear of the presence and future, according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders American Psychiatric Association, effecting patients with dementia, included familial Alzheimer's disease(1252) and other neuropsychiatric disorders(1254). Fennel, a medical herb used in many cultures, has shown effectively in treating anxiety, epidemiologically. In adult Swiss albino male mice, oral administration 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of fennel essential oil significantly increased percent number of entries and time spent in open arms in elevated plus maze (EPM) test(1255).


2.2. In learning and memory
Fennels, the most widely used herbal plant in the world(1256) used in traditional Iranian medicine and modern phytotherapy for memoryenhancing(1257). In Alzheimer's disease, induced a decline of cognitive abilities in mice model, fennel extract successfully ameliorated the amnesic effect of scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg) and aging- induced memory deficits in 8 days in dose-depend manner, through increased step-down latency and acetylcholinesterase inhibition(1258).


3. Da Suan(Garlic)
  Da Suan(Garlic) used in the treatment of symptoms of dementia(1283)(1284)(1285), including Alzheimer's pathophysiology(1288)(1289) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemicals aged garlic extract and S-allyl-L-cysteine and extracts(1284) in oxidative stress inhibition(1284) and anti progression involved association of degeneration and neuro inflammatory activity(1286) through neuro protection against amyloid-beta peptide-induced apoptosis(1285) and toxicity(1287).

3.1. In Alzheimer's disease
Strong evidences suggested that deposited amyloid-beta(Abeta) has shown to associate to the progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD)(1290)(1291)(1292). In mouse model induced by neurotoxic amyloid beta protein (Aβ), ethyl acetate fractions of garlic extract exhibited high levels of radical scavenging activity involved cognitive impairment against Aβ-induced neuronal deficit and Aβ-induced learning and memory deficits in vivo(1293). According to Indiana University School of Medicine, the extracts also attenuated synaptic degeneration and neuroinflammatory pathways associated with AD, through major phytochemical S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) (1294), including oxidative insults to neurons(1295). In Alzheimer's transgenic model Tg2576, dietary aged garlic extract (AGE) (2%) exhibited anti-amyloidogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-tangle effects also through its phytochemicals S-allyl-cysteine (SAC) (20 mg/kg) and di-allyl-disulfide (DADS)(1296) without interfering with its antibiotic activity in ameliorate gentamicin (GM)(1297).

3.2. In Parkinson disease
Olfactory dysfunction(1298)(1299) in non-motor functioning and hyposmia(1300)(1301)/anosmia(1302)(1303) are common manifestation in some neurodegenerative disorders caused by oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory insults(1305), including Parkinson disease. Dietary supplement S-methyl-L-cysteine, a substrate in the catalytic antioxidant system mediated by MSRA showed to protect cells from oxidative damage through its antioxidative effect(1304) when used conjunction with methionine sulfoxide reductase A in Parkinson's-like symptoms(1304).

3.3. In Cognitive impairment
In early cognitive deficits caused by gradual accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) oligomers of Abeta42 species, aged garlic extract, in mice model, prevented progressive behavioral impairment, slowed plaque development, through protection against deterioration of hippocampal based memory(1306), In Alzheimer's disease induced mice model, S-allyl cysteine, a component of aged garlic extract, ameliorated cognitive deficits and oxidative damage in the hippocampus of intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ)(1308). According to Gyeongsang National University, the effectiveness of aged garlic extracts, in neurodegenerative disorders, notably Alzheimer's disease(AD), may be due to its antioxidant activities in improvement of cognitive impairment against Aβ-induced neuronal deficit(1307).

3.4. In learning and memory
Acute and chronic oral administration of aged garlic extract, in mice using step down latency (SDL) by passive avoidance response and transfer latency (TL) using elevated plus maze, improved learning and memory probably due to cortical acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels activities and anti-oxidant property(1309). In oxidative damage and spatiallearning and memory deficits induced mice model, S-allylcysteine exerted its protective effect against reactive oxygen species. Abeta(25-35)-induced hippocampal toxicity and learning deficits, through its free radical scavenging and ameliorated lipid peroxidation activities(1310).

C.5.2. Dementia due to aging depletion of Kidney Essence
Aging related to gradual lost of kidney essence effects the bone and bone marrow in production of red blood cells causes of nutrients and oxygen deficiency in the brain in induction of symptoms of dementia(1311)(1312).
1. Dong Chong Cao(Cordyceps)
Dong Chong Cao, the sweet and warm herb, is also known as cordyceps, used in traditional Chinese medicine as anti-arrhythmia, anti-rejection in cornea transplant, antimicrobal effects and to attenuate contraction of smooth muscles, protect against toxins induced kedney and liver diseases, treat chronic lower back pain, impotence, chronic cough and wheezing, blood in phlegm,... as its tonifies lung yin and kidney yang by enhancing the functions of lung and kidney channels(1313).

Phtochemicals
1. Cordyceps polysaccharide
2. Ergosterol
3. Cordycepic acid
4. Lysine
5. Aspartic acid
6. Threonine
7. Taurine
8. Etc.


In ivitro and in vivo model of Alzheimer's disease, methanol extracts of dong chon cao, prevented the beta-amyloid((25-35) induced neuro cell death(1314) and in rat model of ADs, its phytochemical ophioglossoides significantly prevented spatial memory loss by intracranial injection of Abeta(1314), probably through its free radical scavenging activity(1314).

2. Shi Hu(Dendrobium)
The sweet, bland, slightly cold herb, is also known as Dendrobiu, used in traditional Chinese medicine as anti diabetic(1315)(1316), anti-hyperglycemic((1317)(1318))and anti microbial(1319)(1320) agents caused by yin deficiency and to treat thirsty(1315)(1316), thromboangitis obliterans, chronic throat infection, blurry vision(1321)(1322), weak lower back,... by enhancing the lung, stomach channels(1323).

Phytochemicals
1. Ophiopogonin
2. Ruscogenin
3. β-sitosterol β
4. Stigmasterol
5. Dendrobine
6. Nobilonine
7. 6-hydroxydendrobine
8. Etc.

According to Zunyi Medical College, alkaloids enriched extract fromDendrobium Nobile Lindl. (EDNLA), inhibited paired helical filaments of hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, in neurofibrillary tangles, a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD)(1324). In rat model administrated intragastrically with different doses of DNLA (20, 40 mg/kg), attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg) injecting into the bilateral ventricle, induced hyperphosphorylation of tau protein in hippocampus and protected against LPS-induced apoptosis in brain(1325).


3. Du Zhong(Eucommia bark)
Du Zhong, the sweet, slightly acrid, and warm, is also known as eucommia bark, used in traditional Chinese medicine as anti stress(1325)(1326), anti diuretic(1336), anti inflammatory(1327)(1328), anti infectious(1329), sedative and anesthesia and anti-aging(1336) agents and to treat hypertension(1330)(1331), chronic pain in lower back and knees(1332)(1336), lack of strength, dizziness, impotence(1337), irregular menses and frequent urination(1336) and protect against unstable pregnancy(1336),.... by enhancing the functions of liver and kidney channels(1333).


Phytochemicals
1. Eucommiol
2. Eucommioside
3. Eucommioside-I
4. Cpmoferom
5. Dehydrodiconife4ryl alcohol-4
6. Gamma'-di-O0betta-D-glucopyranoside
7. Liriodendrin
8. (+) -syringaresinol-di-O-Beta-D-glucopyranoside
9. (+)-syringa resinol O-Beta-D-glucopyranoside
10. (+)-syringaresinol monoglucoside
11. syringin
12. Etc.

1. In learning and memory
In scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments by a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ(25-35) mice models, oral administration of aqueous extract of Eucommia bark or the whole herb significantly reversed learning and memory deficits, through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)(1335) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex in a dose-dependent manner(1334)(1335).

2. In Alzheimer's disease (AD)
In hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced neuronal cell death in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark. (EUE), increased cell viability and inhibited cytotoxicity and DNA condensation, through attenuated the increase in ROS production and MMP involved increased risk of dementia reduction(1337).

3. In neuroprotective effects
In PC-12 cells injury mediated by Aβ(25-35) eucommia ulmoides Oliv. (EUO)bark and leaf's phytochemicals, geniposidic acid and chlorogenic acid, significantly protected PC-12 cells against the cytotoxicity(1338). In amyloid beta(25-35) (Aβ(25-35))-induced learning and memory impairments mice
model, the herb laso exhibited neuroprotective effects through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the hippocampus and frontal cortex(1235).


4. Huang qi(Astragalus)
Huang qi, the slightly sweet herb, is also known as astragalus root used in traditional Chinese medicine as immune stimulant(1339)(1342)(1343), tonic(1339)(1344), antioxidant(1339)(1341), hepatoprotectant(1339)(1345)(1346), diuretic(1339), antidiabetic(1339)(1347)(1348), anticancer(1339)(1349)(1350)(1351), expectoran(1339)(1352) and antibiotics(1340) agents and to lessen proteinuria in chronic kidney diseases(1353)(1354), lower blood pressure(1355)(1356) and endothelial dysfunction(1356), improve endurance and protect liver against diseases(1357)(1358),... by enhancing the functions of lung and spleen channels(1359).

Phytochemicals
1. Astralagus menbranaceus
2. Astragaloside I
3. Astragaloside II
4. Daucosterol
5. Beta-sitosterol
6. Palmitic acid
7. Astragalus saponin A,B,C
8. Astramenbrangenin
9. Etc.

Huang qi(Astragalus root) used in the treatment of symptoms of dementia(1360)(1261))(1362)(1362), including Alzheimer's pathophysiology(1363) in traditional Chinese medicine, may be due to its effectiveness of phytochemical astragalosides (AST) and extracts(1365)(1363) in oxidative stress inhibition(1363) and anti progression associated to neuronal cell apoptosis(1363) through inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity(1364), level glucocorticoids (GCs) and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide deposition(1367) and decreasing the expression level of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in cerebral cortex and hippocampus(1365)(1366), ROS generation and neurotoxicity(1368)(1369).

4.1. In learning and memory
Polysaccharides (APS), isolated from Astragalus, in aging female SD rats model, according to the open-field test and the Morris water maze task, improved learning and memory functions of aged rats through up-regulation in the hippocampus neural protein expression(1370). In rats induced neurologic damage of hippocampus by electromagnetic field (EMF) acute or chronic irradiation, Chinese medicine diet (CMD) comprised ferulic acid, ginsenoside, astragalus polysaccharide and rhodiola sachalinensis, showed to protect the impaired learning and memory, the neuron apoptosis, through ameliorating superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and reactive oxygen species (ROS)(1371). In intermittent hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurons impairment rats, astragaloside IV, astragaloside II and astragaloside I, the main compounds inAstragalus extract inhibited the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, decreased the expression of protein level involved imapair learning and memory(1372). According to Anhui Medical University, learning and memory impairments andneurons' apoptosis induced by glucocorticoids in 12-month-old male mice model, extract of Astragalus, improved learning and memory impairments andprevented neuronal cell apoptosis, through increased immunohistochemistry demonstration in hippocampus and neocortex and decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway causes of neron cell death(1373).

4.2. In Alzheimer's and Parkinson disease
Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and stress-level glucocorticoids correlated with dementia progression have shown to associate to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease(1374)(1375). Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents of Astragalus and extract of Astragalus, prevented Aβ1-42-induced neuron cell apoptosis, and ROS generation(1374) and down regulate the protein level builds up as Alzheimer's disease progresses, involved degeneration of hippocampus (CA1, CA3) and neocortex(1375).
According to Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Astragalus, one of the herb used in traditional Chinese medicine for treatment neuro degenerative diseases showed to modulate multiple key events or signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of PD(1376), probably through its phytochemical Astragaloside IV in promoted neurite outgrowth and increased immunoreactive of dopaminergic neurons caused by ROS(1377).

4.3. In neuroprotective effects
In experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage induced early brain injury rat model, Astragaloside IV, exerted its antioxidative and anti-apoptoticeffects(1378)(1379), against increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, neuronal apoptosis and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)(1378). Myelophil, a combination of extracts isolated from Astragali Radix and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix, in brain dysfunctions animal model, also exhibited its anti oxidative stress, ROS activity through attenuated total glutathione (GSH) content, and the activities of GSH-reductase, GSH-S-transferase via ameliorated protein and gene expression(1380) and inflammation and regulating stress hormones(1381).



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Patel PV1, FitzMaurice E, Nandigam RN, Auluck P, Viswanathan A, Goldstein JN, Rosand J, Greenberg SM, Smith EE.(PubMed)
(22) Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma: an unusual form of cerebrovacular accident by Naama O1, Belhachmi A, Ziadi T, Boulahroud O, Abad Elasri C, Elmostarchid B, Boucetta M.(PubMed)
(23) Fatal deterioration of delayed acute subdural hematoma after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review by Chen S1, Xu C, Yuan L, Tian H, Cao H, Guo Y.(PubMed)
(24) Vitamin D, cognitive dysfunction and dementia in older adults by Dickens AP1, Lang IA, Langa KM, Kos K, Llewellyn DJ.(PubMed)
(25) Extraskeletal effects of vitamin D in older adults: cardiovascular disease, mortality, mood, and cognition by Barnard K1, Colón-Emeric C.(PubMed)
(26) Folic acid with or without vitamin B12 for cognition and dementia by Malouf M1, Grimley EJ, Areosa SA.(PubMed)
(27) Vitamin B12 for cognition by Malouf R1, Areosa Sastre A.(PubMed)
(28) The effect of vitamin B6 on cognition by Malouf R1, Grimley Evans J.(PubMed)
(29) Aging, synaptic dysfunction, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 by Deak F1, Sonntag WE.(PubMed)
(30) Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their influence on cognitive aging by Sonntag WE1, Ramsey M, Carter CS.(PubMed)
(31) The role of the somatotropic system in cognition and other cerebral functions by Creyghton WM1, van Dam PS, Koppeschaar HP.(PubMed)
(32) Alzheimer's disease: roles for mitochondrial damage, the hydroxyl radical, and cerebrospinal fluid deficiency of melatonin by Maurizi CP1.(PubMed)
(33) Decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations in plasma of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients by Aldred S1, Mecocci P.(PubMed)
(34) Possible causes of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid fragments, free radicals, and calcium homeostasis by Hölscher C1.(PubMed)
(34a) PROTEIN OXIDATION IN THE BRAIN IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE M. Y. AKSENOV,a,d* M. V. AKSENOVA,a,b D. A. BUTTERFIELD,a,c J. W. GEDDESa,d and W. R. MARKESBERYa,b a Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, US.(Pergamon)
(34b) Interactions between β-amyloid and central cholinergic neurons: implications for Alzheimer's disease by Satyabrata Kar, Stephen P.M. Slowikowski, David Westaway, and Howard T.J. Mount(PubMed)
(34c) The Impact of Cholesterol, DHA, and Sphingolipids on Alzheimer's Disease by Marcus O. W. Grimm, Valeri e C. Zimmer, 1 Johannes Lehmann, Heike S. Grimm, and Tobias Hartmann (PubMed)
(34d) DHA Improves Cognition and Prevents Dysfunction of Entorhinal Cortex Neurons in 3xTg-AD Mice Dany Arsenault,1,2 Carl Julien,1,2 Cyntia Tremblay,2 and Frédéric Calon1,2,(PubMed)
(35) Administration of DHA-PS to aged mice was suitable for increasing hippocampal PS and DHA ratio by Ohkubo T1, Tanaka Y.(PubMed)
(35a) Neuronal specific increase of phosphatidylserine by docosahexaenoic acid.by Guo M1, Stockert L, Akbar M, Kim HY.(PubMed)
(35b) Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential fatty acid for the proper functioning of neuronal cells: their role in mood disorders By Alfonso Valenzuela B. ( University of Chile)
(36) Vitamin E for Alzheimer's dementia and mild cognitive impairment by Farina N1, Isaac MG, Clark AR, Rusted J, Tabet N.(PubMed)
(36a)Inflammatory mediator and beta-amyloid (25-35)-induced ceramide generation and iNOS expression are inhibited by vitamin E by Ayasolla K1, Khan M, Singh AK, Singh I.(PubMed)
(36b) Vitamin E but not 17beta-estradiol protects against vascular toxicity induced by beta-amyloid wild type and the Dutch amyloid variant by Muñoz FJ1, Opazo C, Gil-Gómez G, Tapia G, Fernández V, Valverde MA, Inestrosa NC.(PubMed)
(36c) Parkin protects against mitochondrial toxins and beta-amyloid accumulation in skeletal muscle cells by Rosen KM1, Veereshwarayya V, Moussa CE, Fu Q, Goldberg MS, Schlossmacher MG, Shen J, Querfurth HW.(PubMed)
(37) Soybean-Derived Phosphatidylserine Improves Memory Function of the Elderly Japanese Subjects with Memory Complaints by Akito Kato-Kataoka,1,* Masashi Sakai,1 Rika Ebina,1 Chiaki Nonaka,2 Tsuguyoshi Asano,3 and Takashi Miyamori4(PubMed)
(38) Oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress in early stages of Alzheimer's disease by Mota SI1, Costa RO1, Ferreira IL1, Santana I2, Caldeira GL3, Padovano C3, Fonseca AC3, Baldeiras I4, Cunha C5, Letra L5, Oliveira CR4, Pereira CM6, Rego AC7.(PubMed)
(39) Nutritional biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease: the association between carotenoids, n-3 fatty acids, and dementia severity by Wang W1, Shinto L, Connor WE, Quinn JF.(PubMed)
(40) The effect of soybean-derived phosphatidylserine on cognitive performance in elderly with subjective memory complaints: a pilot study by Yael Richter, Yael Herzog, Yael Lifshitz, Rami Hayun, and Sigalit Zchut(PubMed)
(41) Action of long-chain fatty acids on protein kinase C activity: comparison of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.by Holian O1, Nelson R.(PubMed)
(42) Interactions between β-amyloid and central cholinergic neurons: implications for Alzheimer's disease by Satyabrata Kar, Stephen P.M. Slowikowski, David Westaway, and Howard T.J. Mount(PubMed)
(43) Chapter 12Memory Impairments Associated with Stress and Aging by Carmen Sandi.(PubMed)
(44) Small Amounts of Isotope-reinforced Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Suppress Lipid Autoxidation by Shauna Hill,a Connor R. Lamberson,b Libin Xu,b Randy To,a Hui S. Tsui,a Vadim V. Shmanai,c Andrei V. Bekish,dAgape M. Awad,a Beth N. Marbois,a Charles R. Cantor,e,f Ned A. Porter,b Catherine F. Clarke,a,* and Mikhail S. Shchepinovf,*(PubMed)
(45) Isotopic reinforcement of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids diminishes nigrostriatal degeneration in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by Mikhail S. Shchepinova, , Vivian P. Choub, e, , Erik Pollockc, , J. William Langstonb, , Charles R. Cantora, d, , Robert J. Molinaria, , Amy B. Manning-Boğb, e,(ScienceDirect)
(46) Altered lipofuscin pigmentation in the basal nucleus (Meynert) in Parkinson's disease by
Ulfig N1.(PubMed)
(47) Changes within the basal nucleus in Parkinson's disease by Ulfig N1, Braak E, Braak H.(PubMed)
(48) Free radicals in Parkinson's disease by Koutsilieri E1, Scheller C, Grünblatt E, Nara K, Li J, Riederer P.(PubMed)
(49) Considerations on the role of environmental toxins in idiopathic Parkinson's disease pathophysiology by Pan-Montojo F1, Reichmann H2.(PubMed)
(50) Superoxide dismutase overexpression protects dopaminergic neurons in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease by Botella JA1, Bayersdorfer F, Schneuwly S.(PubMed)
(51) Superoxide dismutase activity in early and advanced Parkinson's disease by Bostantjopoulou S1, Kyriazis G, Katsarou Z, Kiosseoglou G, Kazis A, Mentenopoulos G.(PubMed)
(52) Quercetin up-regulates mitochondrial complex-I activity to protect against programmed cell death in rotenone model of Parkinson's disease in rats by Karuppagounder SS1, Madathil SK, Pandey M, Haobam R, Rajamma U, Mohanakumar KP.(PubMed)
(53) Behavioral and neurochemical effects of alpha-lipoic Acid in the model of Parkinson's disease induced by unilateral stereotaxic injection of 6-ohda in rat by de Araújo DP1, De Sousa CN, Araújo PV, Menezes CE, Sousa Rodrigues FT, Escudeiro SS, Lima NB, Patrocínio MC, Aguiar LM, Viana GS, Vasconcelos SM.(PubMed)
(54) Acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid affect rotenone-induced damage in nigral dopaminergic neurons of rat brain, implication for Parkinson's disease therapy by Zaitone SA1, Abo-Elmatty DM, Shaalan AA.(PubMed)
(55) Association of serum uric acid levels with the progression of Parkinson's disease in Chinese patients by Sun CC1, Luo FF, Wei L, Lei M, Li GF, Liu ZL, LE WD, Xu PY.(PubMed)
(56) Uric acid in Parkinson's disease by Schlesinger I1, Schlesinger N.(PubMed)
(57) Potential role of uric acid in metabolic syndrome, hypertension, kidney injury, and cardiovascular diseases: is it time for reappraisal? by Soltani Z1, Rasheed K, Kapusta DR, Reisin E.(PubMed)
(58) Gout-associated uric acid crystals activate the NALP3 inflammasome. by Martinon F1, Pétrilli V, Mayor A, Tardivel A, Tschopp J.(PubMed)
(59) Lipid mediator interplay: resolvin D1 attenuates inflammation evoked by glutathione-conjugated lipid peroxidation products. by Filep JG1.(PubMed)
(60) Reduction of free radicals in multiple sclerosis: effect of glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) by 
Iarlori C1, Gambi D, Lugaresi A, Patruno A, Felaco M, Salvatore M, Speranza L, Reale M.(PubMed)
(61) IL-1, IL-1R and TNFalpha gene polymorphisms in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis. by
Sarial S1, Shokrgozar MA, Amirzargar A, Shokri F, Radfar J, Zohrevand P, Arjang Z, Sahraian MA, Lotfi J.(PubMed)
(62) Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate inhibits ocular neovascularization and vascular permeability in human retinal pigment epithelial and human retinal microvascular endothelial cells via suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF activation by Lee HS1, Jun JH2, Jung EH3, Koo BA4, Kim YS5.(PubMed)
(63) Curcumin inhibits TNFalpha-induced lectin-like oxidised LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) expression and suppresses the inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by an antioxidant mechanism by Lee HS1, Lee MJ, Kim H, Choi SK, Kim JE, Moon HI, Park WH.(PubMed)
(64) [The influence of melatonin on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity during multiply repetitive stress actions].[Article in Russian] by Serikov VS, Liashev IuD.(PubMed)
(65) Melatonin augments hypothermic neuroprotection in a perinatal asphyxia model.by Robertson NJ1, Faulkner S, Fleiss B, Bainbridge A, Andorka C, Price D, Powell E, Lecky-Thompson L, Thei L, Chandrasekaran M, Hristova M, Cady EB,Gressens P, Golay X, Raivich G.(PubMed)
(66) Therapeutic potential of melatonin and its analogs in Parkinson's disease: focus on sleep and neuroprotection.by Srinivasan V1, Cardinali DP, Srinivasan US, Kaur C, Brown GM, Spence DW, Hardeland R, Pandi-Perumal SR.(PubMed)
(67) High dose antioxidant supplementation to MS patients. Effects on glutathione peroxidase, clinical safety, and absorption of selenium. by Mai J1, Sørensen PS, Hansen JC.(PubMed)
(68) Oxidative stress in patients with multiple sclerosis. by Syburra C1, Passi S.(PubMed)
(69) Selenium in chronic neurologic diseases. Multiple sclerosis and Batten's disease by Clausen J1, Jensen GE, Nielsen SA.(PubMed)
(70) The biochemical pathways of central nervous system neural degeneration in niacin deficiency byFu L1, Doreswamy V2, Prakash R2.(PubMed)
(71) Nutrition and performance in children. by Fanjiang G1, Kleinman RE.(PubMed)
(72) Molecular mechanism underlying the impact of vitamin D on disease activity of MS.by Munger KL1, Köchert K2, Simon KC1, Kappos L3, Polman CH4, Freedman MS5, Hartung HP6, Miller DH7, Montalbán X8, Edan G9, Barkhof F4, Pleimes D2,Sandbrink R10, Ascherio A1, Pohl C11.(PubMed)
 (73) Vitamin D: The Multiple Sclerosis Connection by David Perlmutter, M.D. (The Huffington post)
(74) System xC- is a mediator of microglial function and its deletion slows symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice by Mesci P1, Zaïdi S1, Lobsiger CS1, Millecamps S1, Escartin C2, Seilhean D1, Sato H3, Mallat M1, Boillée S4.(PubMed)
(75) Microglia and motor neurons during disease progression in the SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: changes in arginase1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase by Lewis KE, Rasmussen AL, Bennett W, King A, West AK, Chung RS, Chuah MI1.(PubMed)
(76) Mutant disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 in astrocytes: focus on glutamate metabolism by Abazyan S1, Yang EJ, Abazyan B, Xia M, Yang C, Rojas C, Slusher B, Sattler R, Pletnikov M.(PubMed)
(77) Glutamate release and free radical production following brain injury: effects of posttraumatic hypothermia by Globus MY1, Alonso O, Dietrich WD, Busto R, Ginsberg MD.(PubMed)
(78) Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death. by Hemendinger RA1, Armstrong EJ 3rd, Brooks BR.(PubMed)
(79) [Clinical trials of ultra-high-dose methylcobalamin in ALS].[Article in Japanese] by Izumi Y1, Kaji R.(PubMed)
(80) Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers. by Fernandes KS1, Silva AH, Mendanha SA, Rezende KR, Alonso A.(PubMed)
(81) Vitamin E serum levels and controlled supplementation and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by Michal Freedman D1, Kuncl RW, Weinstein SJ, Malila N, Virtamo J, Albanes D.(PubMed)
(82) Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes by Pratt AJ1, Shin DS1, Merz GE2, Rambo RP3, Lancaster WA4, Dyer KN3, Borbat PP5, Poole FL 2nd4, Adams MW4, Freed JH5, Crane BR2, Tainer JA6, Getzoff ED7.(PubMed)
(83) Hydrogen peroxide induce modifications of human extracellular superoxide dismutase that results in enzyme inhibition by Gottfredsen RH1, Larsen UG, Enghild JJ, Petersen SV.(PubMed)
(84) Oxidative DNA damage and alteration of glutamate transporter expressions in the hippocampal Ca1 area immediately after ischemic insult.by An SJ1, Kang TC, Park SK, Hwang IK, Cho SS, Chung MH, Won MH.(PubMed)
(85) Functional contribution of the transcription factor ATF4 to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.by Matus S1, Lopez E, Valenzuela V, Nassif M, Hetz C.(PubMed)
(86) Amino acids as biomarkers in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS.by Bame M1, Grier RE, Needleman R, Brusilow WS.(PubMed)
(87) Branched-chain amino acids and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a treatment failure? The Italian ALS Study Group.[No authors listed](PubMed)
(88) A high fat, high cholesterol diet leads to changes in metabolite patterns in pigs--a metabolomic study by Sun J1, Monagas M2, Jang S2, Molokin A2, Harnly JM1, Urban JF Jr2, Solano-Aguilar G2, Chen P3.(PubMed)
(89 Long-term exposure to high fat diet is bad for your brain: exacerbation of focal ischemic brain injury by Langdon KD1, Clarke J, Corbett D.(PubMed)
(90) Brain repair: cell therapy in stroke by Kalladka D1, Muir KW1.(PubMed)
(91) Microglial responses after ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage.by Taylor RA1, Sansing LH.(PubMed)
(92) Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia: a statement for healthcare professionals from the american heart association/american stroke association by  Gorelick PB, Scuteri A, Black SE, Decarli C, Greenberg SM, Iadecola C, Launer LJ, Laurent S, Lopez OL, Nyenhuis D, Petersen RC, Schneider JA, Tzourio C,Arnett DK, Bennett DA, Chui HC, Higashida RT, Lindquist R, Nilsson PM, Roman GC, Sellke FW, Seshadri S; American Heart Association Stroke Council, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention, and Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia.(PubMed)
(93) Mild cognitive impairment in stroke patients with ischemic cerebral small-vessel disease: a forerunner of vascular dementia by Grau-Olivares M1, Arboix A.(PubMed)
(94) Risk of incident stroke in patients with Alzheimer disease or vascular dementia by Imfeld P1, Bodmer M, Schuerch M, Jick SS, Meier CR.(PubMed)
(95) Prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with pre-stroke and post-stroke dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis by Pendlebury ST1, Rothwell PM.(PubMed)
(96) Lewy body(Wikipedia)
(97) Visual signs and symptoms of dementia with Lewy bodies by Armstrong RA1(PubMed)
(98) Dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer disease: neurodegenerative patterns characterized by DTI by Kantarci K1, Avula R, Senjem ML, Samikoglu AR, Zhang B, Weigand SD, Przybelski SA, Edmonson HA, Vemuri P, Knopman DS, Ferman TJ, Boeve BF,Petersen RC, Jack CR Jr.(PubMed)
(99) Saccade impairments in patients with fronto-temporal dementia by Meyniel C1, Rivaud-Péchoux S, Damier P, Gaymard B.(PubMed)
(100) [Depression and frontal dysfunction: risks for the elderly?].[Article in French]by Thomas P1, Hazif Thomas C, Billon R, Peix R, Faugeron P, Clément JP.(PubMed)
(101) Neuroanatomical correlates of the progressive supranuclear palsy corticobasal syndrome hybrid by Josephs KA1, Eggers SD, Jack CR Jr, Whitwell JL.(PubMed)
(102) Patterns of brain atrophy that differentiate corticobasal degeneration syndrome from progressive supranuclear palsy by Boxer AL1, Geschwind MD, Belfor N, Gorno-Tempini ML, Schauer GF, Miller BL, Weiner MW, Rosen HJ.(PubMed)
(103) Thiamine deficiency degrades the link between spatial behavior and hippocampal synapsin I and phosphorylated synapsin I protein levels by Resende LS1, Ribeiro AM, Werner D, Hall JM, Savage LM.(PubMed)
(104) Macrostructural abnormalities in Korsakoff syndrome compared with uncomplicated alcoholism by Pitel AL1, Chételat G, Le Berre AP, Desgranges B, Eustache F, Beaunieux H.(PubMed)
(105) Anorexia nervosa and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case report by Saad L1, Silva LF, Banzato CE, Dantas CR, Garcia C Jr.(PubMed)
(106) The significance of cerebral white matter abnormalities 100 years after Binswanger's report. A review by Pantoni L1, Garcia JH.(PubMed)
(107) Senile dementia of the Binswanger's type.by Olsen CG1, Clasen ME.(PubMed)
(108) Human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia complex: role of cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage.by Aquaro S1, Ronga L, Pollicita M, Antinori A, Ranazzi A, Perno CF.(PubMed)
(109) Intracerebral cytokine messenger RNA expression in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia by Wesselingh SL1, Power C, Glass JD, Tyor WR, McArthur JC, Farber JM, Griffin JW, Griffin DE.(PubMed)
(110) Atypical features of dementia in a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.by Pachalska M1, Kurzbauer H, Formińska-Kapuścik M, Urbanik A, Bierzyńska-Macyszyn G, Właszczuk P.(PubMed)
(111) A short scale for evaluation of neuropsychiatric disorders in Parkinson's disease: first psychometric approach by Martinez-Martin P1, Frades-Payo B, Agüera-Ortiz L, Ayuga-Martinez A.(PubMed)
(112) Huntington's disease(Wikipedia)
(113) Cognitive and functional decline in Huntington's disease: dementia criteria revisited.by Peavy GM1, Jacobson MW, Goldstein JL, Hamilton JM, Kane A, Gamst AC, Lessig SL, Lee JC, Corey-Bloom J.(PubMed)
(114) Cognitive forms of multiple sclerosis: report of a dementia case by Stoquart-Elsankari S1, Périn B, Lehmann P, Gondry-Jouet C, Godefroy O.(PubMed)
(115) Midlife and late-life obesity and the risk of dementia: cardiovascular health study by Fitzpatrick AL1, Kuller LH, Lopez OL, Diehr P, O'Meara ES, Longstreth WT Jr, Luchsinger JA.(PubMed)
(116) Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I as an endocrine axis in Alzheimer's disease by Gómez JM1.(PubMed)
(117) Senile dementia of the Binswanger's type by Olsen CG1, Clasen ME.(PubMed)
(118) Estrogen therapy and Alzheimer's dementia by Craig MC1, Murphy DG.(PubMed)
(119) Estrogen-replacement therapy and Alzheimer's disease in the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging by Baldereschi M1, Di Carlo A, Lepore V, Bracco L, Maggi S, Grigoletto F, Scarlato G, Amaducci L.(PubMed)
(120) Relationship between testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin and plasma amyloid beta peptide 40 in older men with subjective memory loss or dementia by Gillett MJ1, Martins RN, Clarnette RM, Chubb SA, Bruce DG, Yeap BB.(PubMed)
(121) Serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA-sulfate (DHEA-S) in Alzheimer's disease and in cerebrovascular dementia by Yanase T1, Fukahori M, Taniguchi S, Nishi Y, Sakai Y, Takayanagi R, Haji M, Nawata H.(PubMed)
(122) Decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations in plasma of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients by Aldred S1, Mecocci P.(PubMed)
(123) The role of gonadotropins in Alzheimer's disease: potential neurodegenerative mechanisms by
Barron AM1, Verdile G, Martins RN.(PubMed)
(124) Neurologic disease in injection drug users: therapeutic issues by Royal W 3rd1.(PubMed)
(125) Antiretroviral therapy for drug users by Clarke SM1, Mulcahy FM.(PubMed)
(126) Profiles of cognitive dysfunction in chronic amphetamine and heroin abusers by 
Ornstein TJ1, Iddon JL, Baldacchino AM, Sahakian BJ, London M, Everitt BJ, Robbins TW.(PubMed)
(127) Acceleration of HIV dementia with methamphetamine and cocaine by Nath A1, Maragos WF, Avison MJ, Schmitt FA, Berger JR.(PubMed)
(128) Lysergic acid diethylamide(Wikipedia)
(129) The Consumers Union Report on Licit and Illicit Drugs by Edward M. Brecher and the Editors of Consumer Reports Magazine, 1972(Schaffer library and drug policy)
(130) Publications - DrugFacts(National institute on drug abuse)
(131)  Review: The neuropathology of drug abuse by Büttner A1.(PubMed)
(132) Lifestyle and the risk of dementia in Japanese-american men by Gelber RP1, Petrovitch H, Masaki KH, Abbott RD, Ross GW, Launer LJ, White LR.(PubMed)
(133) Potential roles of peroxisomes in Alzheimer's disease and in dementia of the Alzheimer's type by Lizard G1, Rouaud O, Demarquoy J, Cherkaoui-Malki M, Iuliano L.(PubMed)
(134) Peroxisome(Wikipedia)
(135) Dietary fat intake and the risk of incident dementia in the Rotterdam Study by Kalmijn S1, Launer LJ, Ott A, Witteman JC, Hofman A, Breteler MM.(PubMed)
(136) Trans fatty acids enhance amyloidogenic processing of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) by Grimm MO1, Rothhaar TL, Grösgen S, Burg VK, Hundsdörfer B, Haupenthal VJ, Friess P, Kins S, Grimm HS, Hartmann T.(PubMed)
(137) Can artificial sweeteners help control body weight and prevent obesity? by Benton D1.(PubMed)
(138) Central obesity and increased risk of dementia more than three decades laterby R. A. Whitmer, PhD, D. R. Gustafson, PhD, E. Barrett-Connor, MD, M. N. Haan, DrPH, E. P. Gunderson, PhD and K. Yaffe, MD(Neurology)
(139) Evaluation of diet and life style in etiopathogenesis of senile dementia: A survey study. by Chaudhuri K1, Samarakoon SM, Chandola HM, Kumar R, Ravishankar B.(PubMed)
(140) WHERE CTE, DIET, and NEURODEGENERATION MEET(Reversing disease for optimal health)
(141) Alcohol drinking, cognitive functions in older age, predementia, and dementia syndromes by
Panza F1, Capurso C, D'Introno A, Colacicco AM, Frisardi V, Lorusso M, Santamato A, Seripa D, Pilotto A, Scafato E, Vendemiale G, Capurso A, Solfrizzi V.(PubMed)
(142) Alcohol and cognition in the elderly: a review by Kim JW1, Lee DY, Lee BC, Jung MH, Kim H, Choi YS, Choi IG.(PubMed)
(143) Lower fluid and fruits/vegetable intake in questionable dementia among older Hong Kong Chinese.by Lee J1, Lam L, Woo J, Kwok T.(PubMed)
(144) Meat consumption in relation to mortality from cardiovascular disease among Japanese men and women by Nagao M1, Iso H, Yamagishi K, Date C, Tamakoshi A.(PubMed)
(145) (145) Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia: harmful or neuroprotective? by Panza F1, Frisardi V, Seripa D, Logroscino G, Santamato A, Imbimbo BP, Scafato E, Pilotto A, Solfrizzi V.(PubMed)
(146) Prescription Drugs That Cause Dementia By Alexander Grouch
(147) The association of psychotropic medication use with the cognitive, functional, and neuropsychiatric trajectory of Alzheimer's disease by Rosenberg PB1, Mielke MM, Han D, Leoutsakos JS, Lyketsos CG, Rabins PV, Zandi PP, Breitner JC, Norton MC, Welsh-Bohmer KA, Zuckerman IH, Rattinger GB, Green RC, Corcoran C, Tschanz JT.(PubMed)
(148) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease by Côté S1, Carmichael PH, Verreault R, Lindsay J, Lefebvre J, Laurin D(PubMed)
(149) Dementia associated with alcohol and other drug use by Hulse GK1, Lautenschlager NT, Tait RJ, Almeida OP..(PubMed)
(150) The Effects of Hallucinogenic Drugs on The Brain. Submitted by SerendipUpdate on Wed, 01/16/2008 - 4:34pm
(151) [Antipsychotic use in the cohort PACA-Alz in patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementia in 2010].[Article in French] by Bonin-Guillaume S1, Martin G2, Zafack J3, Gentile G4, Allaria-Lapierre V5, Sciortino V5, Thirion X3, Micallef J6(PubMed)
(152) Risperidone and dementia-related aggression: new indication. A last resort, no better than haloperidol.[No authors listed](PubMed)
(153) A case of early-onset rapidly progressive dementia by Cachia D1, Smith T2, Paydarfar D3, Pomorska G3(PubMed)
(154)  Delirium and severe illness: Etiologies, severity of delirium and phenomenological differences. by Boettger S1, Jenewein J1, Breitbart W2.(PubMed)
(155) [Unwanted side effects of antibacterials--a diagnostic challenge].[Article in German]by Fux R1, Mörike K, Gleiter CH.(PubMed)
(156) Gatifloxacin-induced delirium and psychosis in an elderly demented woman.by Satyanarayana S, Campbell B.(PubMed)
(157) [Drug-induced cognitive impairment].[Article in Japanese] by Shinohara M1, Yamada M.(PubMed)
(158) Drug-induced cognitive impairment in the elderly. by Moore AR1, O'Keeffe ST.(PubMed)
(159) Systematic review of impact of lifestyle-modification programs on metabolic risks and patient-reported outcomes in adults with metabolic syndrome.by Lin CH1, Chiang SL, Tzeng WC, Chiang LC.(PubMed)
(160) [Live style and risk of lifestyle diseases].[Article in Czech]by Kábrt J.(PubMed)
(161) Metabolic syndrome and the role of dietary lifestyles in Alzheimer's disease by Pasinetti GM1, Eberstein JA.(PubMed)
(162) Impaired affective and cognitive theory of mind and behavioural change in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by van der Hulst EJ1, Bak TH2, Abrahams S2.(PubMed)
(163) Psychophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer Disease.by Corrêa MS1, Vedovelli K1, Giacobbo BL1, de Souza CE2, Ferrari P3, de Lima Argimon II4, Walz JC5, Kapczinski F3, Bromberg E6.(PubMed)
(164) Evaluation of diet and life style in etiopathogenesis of senile dementia: A survey study.by Chaudhuri K1, Samarakoon SM, Chandola HM, Kumar R, Ravishankar B.(PubMed)
(165) Healthy Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating(Mayo clinic)
(166) Binge drinking in midlife and dementia risk by Järvenpää T1, Rinne JO, Koskenvuo M, Räihä I, Kaprio J.(PubMed)
(167) Molecular and neurologic responses to chronic alcohol use by Costin BN1, Miles MF2.(PubMed)
(168) Heavy smoking in midlife and long-term risk of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia by Rusanen M1, Kivipelto M, Quesenberry CP Jr, Zhou J, Whitmer RA.(PubMed)
(169) (169) Smoking: effects on multiple sclerosis susceptibility and disease progression by Dean M. Wingerchuk(PMC)
(170) Comprehensive genetic and mutation analysis of familial dementia with Lewy bodies linked to 2q35-q36 by Meeus B1, Nuytemans K, Crosiers D, Engelborghs S, Peeters K, Mattheijssens M, Elinck E, Corsmit E, De Deyn PP, Van Broeckhoven C, Theuns J.(PubMed)
(171) Inclusion body myopathy, Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia: recurrence of the VCP R155H mutation in an Italian family and implications for genetic counselling by Viassolo V1, Previtali SC, Schiatti E, Magnani G, Minetti C, Zara F, Grasso M, Dagna-Bricarelli F, Di Maria E.(PubMed)
(172) About Dementia Types of Dementia Genetic Mutations(Dementia guide)
(173) Presymptomatic cerebral blood flow changes in CHMP2B mutation carriers of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD-3), measured with MRI. by Lunau L1, Mouridsen K, Rodell A, Ostergaard L, Nielsen JE, Isaacs A, Johannsen P; FReJA Consortium.(PubMed)
(174) Novel mutation of the notch3 gene in arabic family with CADASIL. by Bohlega S1.(PubMed)
(175) Nutrient requirements and optimisation of intakes Judith Buttriss British Nutrition Foundation, London, UK.
(176) Nutritional requirements of older people(The Dairy council)
(177) Behavioural symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and their association with cognitive impairment by Fernández M, Gobartt AL, Balañá M; COOPERA Study Group.(PubMed)
(178) Alzheimer's disease and age-related memory decline (preclinical).by Terry AV Jr1, Callahan PM, Hall B, Webster SJ.(PubMed)
(179) Communication Difficulty and Relevant Interventions in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Implications for Neuroplasticity by Johnson M1, Lin F2.(PubMed)
(180) Anxiety and depression in family caregivers of people with Alzheimer disease: the LASER-AD study. by Mahoney R1, Regan C, Katona C, Livingston G.(PubMed)
(181)  Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplementation for cognition and well-being. by Huppert FA1, Van Niekerk JK, Herbert J.(PubMed)
(182) How longevity research can lead to therapies for Alzheimer's disease: The rapamycin story. by Richardson A1, Galvan V2, Lin AL3, Oddo S4(PubMed)
(183) Evaluation of a Japanese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination in elderly persons. by Ideno Y1, Takayama M, Hayashi K, Takagi H, Sugai Y.(PubMed)
(184) Prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: a cross-sectional descriptive study in Thailand. by Charernboon T, Phanasathit M.(PubMed)
(185) Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia and bipolar spectrum disorders: review of the evidence of a relationship and treatment implications by Dorey JM1, Beauchet O, Thomas Antérion C, Rouch I, Krolak-Salmon P, Gaucher J, Gonthier R, Akiskal HS.(PubMed)
(186) Acetylcholine deficiency(Nutrition healing)
(187) All about dementia(healthcare net)
(188) Association of alcohol drinking with verbal and visuospatial memory impairment in older adults: Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS) study.by Byeon H1, Lee Y2, Lee SY2, Lee KS3, Moon SY4, Kim H5, Hong CH4, Son SJ6, Choi SH7.(PubMed)
(189) Alcohol-related dementia: an update of the evidence. by Ridley NJ1, Draper B2, Withall A3.(PubMed)
(190) [Vascular dementia: big effects of small lesions].[Article in French] by Gold G1, Kövari E.(PubMed)
(191) Symptoms of Multi-Infarct Dementia(Right diagnosis)
(192) The role of neurosonology in the diagnosis of vascular dementia.by Tsivgoulis G1, Katsanos AH2, Papageorgiou SG3, Dardiotis E4, Voumvourakis K3, Giannopoulos S2.(PubMed)
(193) Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms in Poststroke Vascular Cognitive Impairmentby Meena Gupta,* Abhijit Dasgupta, Geeta Anjum Khwaja, Debashish Chowdhury, Yogesh Patidar, and Amit Batra(PubMed)
(194) Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and management by Salawu FK1, Danburam A, Olokoba AB.(PubMed)
(195) Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinson’s Dementia(Helpguide.org)
(196) Anterior cingulate dopamine turnover and behavior change in Parkinson's disease.by Gallagher CL1, Bell B, Palotti M, Oh J, Christian BT, Okonkwo O, Sojkova J, Buyan-Dent L, Nickles RJ, Harding SJ, Stone CK, Johnson SC, Holden JE.(PubMed)
(197) Biomarkers of Parkinson's disease: present and future. by Miller DB1, O'Callaghan JP2.(PubMed)
(198) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Fact Sheet(NIH)
(199) Chronic subdural hematoma presenting with symptoms of transient ischemic attack (TIA): a case report by Wilkinson CC1, Multani J, Bailes JE.(PubMed)
(200) Subdural hematoma(Medline plus)
(201) Head trauma with loss of consciousness as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease by Vijay Chandra, MD, PhD, Emre Kokmen, MD, Bruce S. Schoenberg, MD, DrPH and C. Mary Beard, MPH(Neurology)
(202) Physical complications for elderly inpatients with senile dementia in the Imaise Branch of Ichinomiya City Hospital by Ukai K1, Mizuno Y.(PubMed)
(203) Survival and comfort after treatment of pneumonia in advanced dementia. b Givens JL1, Jones RN, Shaffer ML, Kiely DK, Mitchell SL.(PubMed)
(204) [Obstructive sleep apnea and cognitive impairment in the elderly].[Article in French]by Onen F1, Onen H.(PubMed)
(205) Bone mass and dementia in hip fracture patients from areas with different aluminium concentrations in water supplies.by Wood DJ1, Cooper C, Stevens J, Edwardson J.(PubMed)
(206) Urinary incontinence in dementia - a practical approach. by Yap P1, Tan D.(PubMed)
(207) Venous thromboembolism in immobilized patients with dementia. Findings from the RIETE registry. by Nuñez MJ, Villalba JC, Cebrián E, Visoná A, Lopez-Jimenez L, Núñez M, Szwebel TA, Luque JM, Jaras MJ, Monreal M; RIETE Investigators.(PubMed)
(208) METABOLIC SYNDROME AND THE ROLE OF DIETARY LIFESTYLES IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE by Giulio Maria Pasinetti1 and Jacqueline A. Eberstein2(PubMed)
(209) Metabolic syndrome and the role of dietary lifestyles in Alzheimer's disease.by Pasinetti GM1, Eberstein JA.(PubMed)
(210) Improvement in physiological and psychological parameters after 6 months of yoga practice. by Rocha KK1, Ribeiro AM, Rocha KC, Sousa MB, Albuquerque FS, Ribeiro S, Silva RH.(PubMed)
(211) Evaluation of diet and life style in etiopathogenesis of senile dementia: A survey study. by Chaudhuri K1, Samarakoon SM, Chandola HM, Kumar R, Ravishankar B.(PubMed)
(212)  Aging of theory of mind: the influence of educational level and cognitive processing. by Li X1, Wang K, Wang F, Tao Q, Xie Y, Cheng Q.(PubMed)
(213)  Binge drinking in midlife and dementia risk. by Järvenpää T1, Rinne JO, Koskenvuo M, Räihä I, Kaprio J.(PubMed)
(214) Caffeine as a protective factor in dementia and Alzheimer's disease. by Eskelinen MH1, Kivipelto M.(PubMed)
(215) Reduced risk of Alzheimer disease in users of antioxidant vitamin supplements: the Cache County Study. by Zandi PP1, Anthony JC, Khachaturian AS, Stone SV, Gustafson D, Tschanz JT, Norton MC, Welsh-Bohmer KA, Breitner JC; Cache County Study Group.(PubMed)
(216) Differential effects of acute and regular physical exercise on cognition and affect. by Hopkins ME1, Davis FC, Vantieghem MR, Whalen PJ, Bucci DJ.(PubMed)
(217) Nutrition and Alzheimer's disease: the detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet. by Seneff S1, Wainwright G, Mascitelli L.(PubMed)
(218) Delay Dementia - Deficiency Causes of Dementia by Kyle J. Norton
(219) Delay Dementia - Environment toxin causes of Dementia by Kyle J. Norton
(220) Substance Abuse Causes of Cognitive Impairment induced Dementia? by Kyle J. Norton
(221) Medication Causes of Dementia by Kyle J. Norton
(222) Human catalase, its polymorphisms, regulation and changes of its activity in different diseases. by Kodydková J1, Vávrová L1, Kocík M1, Žák A1.(PubMed)
(223) Systemic oxidative stress and conversion to dementia of elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment. by Cervellati C1, Romani A1, Seripa D2, Cremonini E1, Bosi C3, Magon S3, Bergamini CM1, Valacchi G4, Pilotto A5, Zuliani G3.(PubMed)
(224) Neurodegeneration through oxidative stress: monitoring hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis in primary cells from the subventricular zone of BALB/c mice using field-effect transistors. by Koppenhöfer D1, Kettenbaum F1, Susloparova A1, Law JK1, Vu XT1, Schwab T1, Schäfer KH1, Ingebrandt S2.(PubMed)
(225) Hydrogen peroxide is generated during the very early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides implicated in Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia. byTabner BJ1, El-Agnaf OM, Turnbull S, German MJ, Paleologou KE, Hayashi Y, Cooper LJ, Fullwood NJ, Allsop D.(PubMed)
(226) Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor. by Bekdeşer B1, Özyürek M1, Güçlü K2, Alkan FÜ3, Apak R1.(PubMed)
(227) Dysregulated iron metabolism in the choroid plexus in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. by Ariza J1, Steward C2, Rueckert F2, Widdison M2, Coffman R2, Afjei A2, Noctor SC3, Hagerman R4, Hagerman P5, Martínez-Cerdeño V6.(PubMed)
(228) Delineating the role of glutathione peroxidase 4 in protecting cells against lipid hydroperoxide damage and in Alzheimer's disease byYoo MH1, Gu X, Xu XM, Kim JY, Carlson BA, Patterson AD, Cai H, Gladyshev VN, Hatfield DL.(PubMed)
(229) Biological effects of mutant ceruloplasmin on hepcidin-mediated internalization of ferroportin. by Kono S1, Yoshida K, Tomosugi N, Terada T, Hamaya Y, Kanaoka S, Miyajima H.(PubMed)
(230) Ceruloplasmin-ferroportin system of iron traffic in vertebrates. by Musci G1, Polticelli F1, Bonaccorsi di Patti MC1.(PubMed)
(231) Ceruloplasmin: an acute phase reactant that scavenges oxygen-derived free radicals. by Goldstein IM, Kaplan HB, Edelson HS, Weissmann G.(PubMed)
(232) Protective effect of hesperidin in a model of Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in aged mice by Antunes MS1, Goes AT1, Boeira SP1, Prigol M1, Jesse CR2.(PubMed)
(233) Sulforaphane reduces the alterations induced by quinolinic acid: modulation of glutathione levels. by Santana-Martínez RA1, Galván-Arzáte S2, Hernández-Pando R3, Chánez-Cárdenas ME1, Avila-Chávez E4, López-Acosta G1, Pedraza-Chaverrí J5,Santamaría A6, Maldonado PD7.(PubMed)
(234) Ferritin in the red cells of normal subjects and patients with iron deficiency and iron overload. by Cazzola M, Arosio P, Barosi G, Bergamaschi G, Dezza L, Ascari E.(PubMed)
(235) New functions for an iron storage protein: the role of ferritin in immunity and autoimmunity. by Recalcati S1, Invernizzi P, Arosio P, Cairo G.(PubMed)
(236) CoCl2-induced biochemical hypoxia down regulates activities and expression of super oxide dismutase and catalase in cerebral cortex of mice. by Rani A1, Prasad S.(PubMed)
(237) Transferrin and ferritin response to bacterial infection: the role of the liver and brain in fish. by Neves JV1, Wilson JM, Rodrigues PN.(PubMed)
(238) The significance of ferritin in cancer: anti-oxidation, inflammation and tumorigenesis. by Alkhateeb AA1, Connor JR.(PubMed)
(239) The iron-binding protein Dps2 confers peroxide stress resistance on Bacillus anthracis. by Tu WY1, Pohl S, Gizynski K, Harwood CR.(PubMed)
(240) Antiviral properties of lactoferrin--a natural immunity molecule. by Berlutti F1, Pantanella F, Natalizi T, Frioni A, Paesano R, Polimeni A, Valenti P.(PubMed)
(241) Potential lactoferrin activity against pathogenic viruses. by Redwan EM1, Uversky VN2, El-Fakharany EM3, Al-Mehdar H4.(PubMed)
(242) The antimicrobial activity of lactoferrin: current status and perspectives. by Orsi N1.(PubMed)
(243) Role of lipid oxidation, chelating agents, and antioxidants in metallic flavor development in the oral cavity by Omür-Özbek P1, Dietrich AM, Duncan SE, Lee Y.(PubMed)
(244)Lactoferrin in infant formulas: effect on oxidation by Satué-Gracia MT1, Frankel EN, Rangavajhyala N, German JB.(PubMed)
(245) Contrasting metal detoxification in polychaetes, bivalves and fish from a contaminated bay.by Fan W1, Xu Z2, Wang WX3.(PubMed)
(246) Channa punctata brain metallothionein is a potent scavenger of superoxide radicals and prevents hydroxyl radical-induced in vitro DNA damage by Atif F1, Kaur M, Ansari RA, Raisuddin S.(PubMed)
(247) In vitro free radical scavenging activity of hepatic metallothionein induced in an Indian freshwater fish, Channa punctata Bloch by Atif F1, Kaur M, Yousuf S, Raisuddin S.(PubMed)
(248) Possible role of cutaneous metallothionein in protection against photo-oxidative stress--epidermal localization and scavenging activity for superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by Hanada K1, Baba T, Hashimoto I, Fukui R, Watanabe S.(PubMed)
(249) Quantitation of human metallothionein isoforms: a family of small, highly conserved, cysteine-rich proteins by Mehus AA1, Muhonen WW, Garrett SH, Somji S, Sens DA, Shabb JB.(PubMed)
(250) Nutritional immunity. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin by Barber MF1, Elde NC2.(PubMed)
(251) Total iron binding capacity and transferrin concentration in the assessment of iron status by Kasvosve I1, Delanghe J.(PubMed)
(252) Fibrillation of transferrin by Booyjzsen C1, Scarff CA, Moreton B, Portman I, Scrivens JH, Costantini G, Sadler PJ.(PubMed)
(253) The formation of Fe3+-transferrin-CO3(2-) via the binding and oxidation of Fe2+ by Kojima N, Bates GW.(PubMed)
(254) Iron released from transferrin at acidic pH can catalyse the oxidation of low density lipoprotein. by Lamb DJ1, Leake DS.(PubMed)
(255) Blood substitutes: evolution from noncarrying to oxygen- and gas-carrying fluids by Cabrales P1, Intaglietta M.(PubMed)
(256) Hemoglobin solutions and tissue oxygenation by Muir WW1, Wellman ML.(PubMed)
(257) Plant hemoglobin participation in cell fate determination by Huang S1, Hill RD1, Stasolla C1.(PubMed)
(258) The dual effects of nitrite on hemoglobin-dependent redox reactions. by Lu N1, Chen C2, He Y3, Tian R4, Xiao Q5, Peng YY6.(PubMed)
(259) Redox reactivity in propolis: direct detection of free radicals in basic medium and interaction with hemoglobin by Mot AC1, Damian G, Sarbu C, Silaghi-Dumitrescu R.(PubMed)
(260) Spiking in cytosolic calcium concentration in single fibrinogen-bound fura-2-loaded human platelets by Heemskerk JW1, Hoyland J, Mason WT, Sage SO.(PubMed)
(261) Molecular characterization of Clonorchis sinensis secretory myoglobin: delineating its role in anti-oxidative survival. by Ren M, He L, Huang Y, Mao Q, Li S, Qu H, Bian M, Liang P, Chen X, Ling J, Chen T, Liang C, Wang X, Li X1, Yu X.(PubMed)
(262) Molecular characterization of Clonorchis sinensis secretory myoglobin: delineating its role in anti-oxidative survival by Ren M, He L, Huang Y, Mao Q, Li S, Qu H, Bian M, Liang P, Chen X, Ling J, Chen T, Liang C, Wang X, Li X1, Yu X.(PubMed)
(263) New insights in bilirubin metabolism and their clinical implications b Sticova E1, Jirsa M.(PubMed)
(264) Bilirubin chemistry and metabolism; harmful and protective aspects by Vítek L1, Ostrow JD.(PubMed)
(265) Direct Antioxidant Properties of Bilirubin and Biliverdin. Is there a Role for Biliverdin Reductase? by Jansen T1, Daiber A.(PubMed)
(266) Decreased plasma antioxidants in patients with Alzheimer's disease. by Kim TS1, Pae CU, Yoon SJ, Jang WY, Lee NJ, Kim JJ, Lee SJ, Lee C, Paik IH, Lee CU.(PubMed)
(267) Absorption, metabolism, and transport of carotenoids. by Parker RS1.(PubMed)
(268) Plasma levels of HDL and carotenoids are lower in dementia patients with vascular comorbidities. by Dias IH1, Polidori MC2, Li L1, Weber D3, Stahl W4, Nelles G5, Grune T3, Griffiths HR1.(PubMed)
(269) Retinoids as potential targets for Alzheimer's disease by Sodhi RK1, Singh N2.(PubMed)
(270) The importance of beta-carotene as a source of vitamin A with special regard to pregnant and breastfeeding women by Strobel M1, Tinz J, Biesalski HK.(PubMed)
(271) The effect of vitamin E and beta carotene on the incidence of lung cancer and other cancers in male smokers. The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta Carotene Cancer Prevention Study Group.[No authors listed](PubMed)
(272) Lipid-soluble antioxidants: beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol levels in breast and gynecologic cancers by Palan PR1, Goldberg GL, Basu J, Runowicz CD, Romney SL(PubMed)
(273) Beta-carotene as an interceptor of free radicals. by Ozhogina OA1, Kasaikina OT.(PubMed)
(274) Evidence for a lack of reactivity of carotenoid addition radicals towards oxygen: a laser flash photolysis study of the reactions of carotenoids with acylperoxyl radicals in polar and non-polar solvents by El-Agamey A1, McGarvey DJ.(PubMed)
(275) Oxidative stress in blood in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment: a meta-analysis by Schrag M1, Mueller C, Zabel M, Crofton A, Kirsch WM, Ghribi O, Squitti R, Perry G.(PubMed)
(276) Influence of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) flavone on dermal wound healing in rats by Gupta A1, Kumar R, Pal K, Singh V, Banerjee PK, Sawhney RC.(PubMed)
(277) Flavonoids identified from Korean Scutellaria baicalensis induce apoptosis by ROS generation and caspase activation on human fibrosarcoma cells by Zhang J1, Park HS, Kim JA, Hong GE, Nagappan A, Park KI, Kim GS.(PubMed)
(278) Intake of flavonoids and risk of dementia.by Commenges D1, Scotet V, Renaud S, Jacqmin-Gadda H, Barberger-Gateau P, Dartigues JF.(PubMed)
(279) Flavonoids and dementia: an update by Orhan IE, Daglia M, Nabavi SF, Loizzo MR, Sobarzo-Sánchez E, Nabavi SM1.(PubMed)
(280) Nitric oxide in immunity and inflammation by Coleman JW1.(PubMed)
(281) Inducible defense mechanism against nitric oxide in Candida albicans by Ullmann BD1, Myers H, Chiranand W, Lazzell AL, Zhao Q, Vega LA, Lopez-Ribot JL, Gardner PR, Gustin MC.(PubMed)
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RADICAL CAUSES OF CANCER by SP Hussain(283) The role of nitric oxide in cancer by Xu W1, Liu LZ, Loizidou M, Ahmed M, Charles IG.(PubMed)
(284) Green tea extract and its polyphenols markedly inhibit luminol-dependent chemiluminescence activated by peroxynitrite or SIN-1 by Van Dyke K1, McConnell P, Marquardt L.(PubMed)
(285) Integrating glutathione metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction with implications for Parkinson's disease: a dynamic model by Vali S1, Mythri RB, Jagatha B, Padiadpu J, Ramanujan KS, Andersen JK, Gorin F, Bharath MM.(PubMed)
(286) Vitamin A/retinol and maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells by Khillan JS1.(PubMed)
(287) In vivo changes in plasma coenzyme Q10, carotenoid, tocopherol, and retinol levels in children after computer tomography by Halm BM1, Lai JF2, Morrison CM2, Pagano I2, Custer LJ2, Cooney RV3, Franke AA4.(PubMed)
(288) Nonalcoholic red wine extract and quercetin inhibit LDL oxidation without affecting plasma antioxidant vitamin and carotenoid concentrations by Chopra M1, Fitzsimons PE, Strain JJ, Thurnham DI, Howard AN.(PubMed)
(289) Vitamin A deficiency causes hyperglycemia and loss of pancreatic β-cell mass by Trasino SE1, Benoit YD1, Gudas LJ2.(PubMed)
(290) Effects of early inhaled nitric oxide therapy and vitamin A supplementation on the risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature newborns with respiratory failure by Gadhia MM1, Cutter GR2, Abman SH3, Kinsella JP4(PubMed)
(291) Antioxidant functions of vitamins. Vitamins E and C, beta-carotene, and other carotenoids by Sies H1, Stahl W, Sundquist AR.(PubMed)
(292) Antioxidant functions of vitamins. Vitamins E and C, beta-carotene, and other carotenoids by Sies H1, Stahl W, Sundquist AR.(PubMed)
(293) Functional and physiological role of vitamin C transporters by Bürzle M1, Hediger MA.(PubMed)
(294) Ascorbic acid spares alpha-tocopherol and prevents lipid peroxidation in cultured H4IIE liver cells by Huang J1, May JM.(PubMed)
(295) Effect of vitamin C supplements on cell-mediated immunity in old people. by Kennes B, Dumont I, Brohee D, Hubert C, Neve P.(PubMed)
(296) Essential role of vitamin C and zinc in child immunity and health by Maggini S1, Wenzlaff S, Hornig D.(PubMed)
(297) Ascorbic acid: its role in immune system and chronic inflammation diseases by Sorice A, Guerriero E, Capone F, Colonna G, Castello G, Costantini S1.(PubMed)
(298) Multifunctional PLGA particles containing poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles and ascorbic acid with simultaneous antioxidative and prolonged antimicrobial activity by Stevanović M1, Bračko I, Milenković M, Filipović N, Nunić J, Filipič M, Uskoković DP.(PubMed)
(299) The prevention of air pollution damage to plants by the use of vitamin C sprays. by FREEBAIRN HT.(PubMed)
(300) Vitamin E: function and metabolism by Brigelius-Flohé R1, Traber MG.(PubMed)
(301) Vitamin E: action, metabolism and perspectives by Herrera E1, Barbas C.(PubMed)
(302) Polymeric films loaded with vitamin E and aloe vera for topical application in the treatment of burn wounds by Pereira GG1, Guterres SS1, Balducci AG2, Colombo P2, Sonvico F3.(PubMed)
(303) Function of vitamin E in physical exercise: a review by Gerster H1.(PubMed)
(304) Oxidative stress and damage induced by abnormal free radical reactions and IgA nephropathy by Chen JX1, Zhou JF, Shen HC.(PubMed)
(305) Effects of vitamin E on cognitive performance during ageing and in Alzheimer's disease by La Fata G1, Weber P2, Mohajeri MH3.(PubMed)
(306) Redox modulation of cellular stress response and lipoxin A4 expression by Coriolus versicolor in rat brain: Relevance to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. by Trovato A1, Siracusa R2, Di Paola R2, Scuto M1, Fronte V1, Koverech G1, Luca M1, Serra A3, Toscano MA1, Petralia A3, Cuzzocrea S2, Calabrese V4.(PubMed)
(307) Chemical stabilization of oils rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during storage by Pop F1.(PubMed)
(308) Anti-inflammatory effects of supercritical carbon dioxide extract and its isolated carnosic acid from Rosmarinus officinalis leaves by Kuo CF1, Su JD, Chiu CH, Peng CC, Chang CH, Sung TY, Huang SH, Lee WC, Chyau CC.(PubMed)
(309) Protective effect of supercritical fluid rosemary extract, Rosmarinus officinalis, on antioxidants of major organs of aged rats by Posadas SJ1, Caz V, Largo C, De la Gándara B, Matallanas B, Reglero G, De Miguel E.(PubMed)
(310) Comparative antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, [10]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol by Dugasani S1, Pichika MR, Nadarajah VD, Balijepalli MK, Tandra S, Korlakunta JN.(PubMed)
(311) Gingerol fraction from Zingiber officinale protects against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. by Rodrigues FA1, Prata MM, Oliveira IC, Alves NT, Freitas RE, Monteiro HS, Silva JA, Vieira PC, Viana DA, Libório AB, Havt A.(PubMed)
(312) Anti-proliferative and antioxidant properties of rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis by Cheung S1, Tai J.(PubMed)
(313) Effects of "nitrendipine" on nitrous oxide anesthesia, tolerance, and physical dependence by Dolin SJ1, Little HJ.(PubMed)
(314) Muscarinic, Ca(++) antagonist and specific butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of dried ginger extract might explain its use in dementia by Ghayur MN1, Gilani AH, Ahmed T, Khalid A, Nawaz SA, Agbedahunsi JM, Choudhary MI, Houghton PJ.(PubMed)
(315) [Effect of AChE and BuChE inhibition by rivastigmin in a group of old-old elderly patients with cerebrovascular impairment (SIVD type)].[Article in Italian] by Servello A1, Andreozzi P, Bechini F, De Angelis R, Pontecorvo ML, Vulcano A, Cerra E, Vigliotta MT, Artini M, Selan L, Ettorre E.(PubMed)
(316) Selective acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors reduce amyloid-β ex vivo activation of peripheral chemo-cytokines from Alzheimer's disease subjects: exploring the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway by Reale M, Di Nicola M, Velluto L, D'Angelo C, Costantini E, Lahiri DK, Kamal MA, Yu QS, Greig NH1.(PubMed)
(317) Antioxidant properties, radical scavenging activity and biomolecule protection capacity of flavonoid naringenin and its glycoside naringin: a comparative study by Cavia-Saiz M1, Busto MD, Pilar-Izquierdo MC, Ortega N, Perez-Mateos M, Muñiz P.(PubMed)
(318) Naringenin ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) caused by the intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin in rat model by Khan MB1, Khan MM, Khan A, Ahmed ME, Ishrat T, Tabassum R, Vaibhav K, Ahmad A, Islam F.(PubMed)
(319) Effect of naringenin on brain insulin signaling and cognitive functions in ICV-STZ induced dementia model of rats by Yang W1, Ma J, Liu Z, Lu Y, Hu B, Yu H.(PubMed)
(320) A review on pharmacological and analytical aspects of naringenin by Patel K1, Singh GK, Patel DK.(PubMed)
(321) Anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects of naringenin in diabetic mice by Tsai SJ1, Huang CS, Mong MC, Kam WY, Huang HY, Yin MC.(PubMed)
(322) Is there a causal link between inflammation and dementia by Enciu AM1, Popescu BO.(PubMed)
(323) Anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids: genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein inhibit STAT-1 and NF-kappaB activations, whereas flavone, isorhamnetin, naringenin, and pelargonidin inhibit only NF-kappaB activation along with their inhibitory effect on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages by Hämäläinen M1, Nieminen R, Vuorela P, Heinonen M, Moilanen E.(PubMed)
(324) Dietary flavonoid naringenin induces regulatory T cells via an aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated pathway by Wang HK1, Yeh CH, Iwamoto T, Satsu H, Shimizu M, Totsuka M.(PubMed)
(325) A global immune deficit in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment disclosed by a novel data mining process by Gironi M1, Borgiani B1, Farina E2, Mariani E3, Cursano C3, Alberoni M2, Nemni R2, Comi G4, Buscema M5, Furlan R4, Grossi E6.(PubMed)
(326) Polarization of the effects of autoimmune and neurodegenerative risk alleles in leukocytes. by Raj T1, Rothamel K, Mostafavi S, Ye C, Lee MN, Replogle JM, Feng T, Lee M, Asinovski N, Frohlich I, Imboywa S, Von Korff A, Okada Y, Patsopoulos NA, Davis S, McCabe C, Paik HI, Srivastava GP, Raychaudhuri S, Hafler DA, Koller D, Regev A, Hacohen N, Mathis D, Benoist C, Stranger BE, De Jager PL.(PubMed)
(327) Tissue distribution and neuroprotective effects of citrus flavonoid tangeretin in a rat model of Parkinson's disease by Datla KP1, Christidou M, Widmer WW, Rooprai HK, Dexter DT.(PubMed)
(328) Tangeretin exerts anti-neuroinflammatory effects via NF-κB modulation in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells by Shu Z1, Yang B1, Zhao H2, Xu B1, Jiao W1, Wang Q1, Wang Z1, Kuang H3.(PubMed)
(329) Mild mitochondrial depolarization is involved in a neuroprotective mechanism of Citrus sunki peel extract by Wu JJ1, Cui Y, Yang YS, Jung SC, Hyun JW, Maeng YH, Park DB, Lee SR, Kim SJ, Eun SY.(PubMed)
(330) Antioxidant activity and effective compounds of immature calamondin peel by Yu MW1, Lou SN, Chiu EM, Ho CT.(PubMed)
(331) Polymethoxylated flavones, flavanone glycosides, carotenoids, and antioxidants in different cultivation types of tangerines ( Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Sainampueng) from Northern Thailand by Stuetz W1, Prapamontol T, Hongsibsong S, Biesalski HK.(PubMed)
(332) Tangeretin ameliorates oxidative stress in the renal tissues of rats with experimental breast cancer induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene by Lakshmi A1, Subramanian SP2.(PubMed)
(333) Chemotherapeutic effect of tangeretin, a polymethoxylated flavone studied in 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced mammary carcinoma in experimental rats. by Lakshmi A1, Subramanian S2.(PubMed)
(334) Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, exerts cytostatic effect via p53/p21 up-regulation and suppresses metastasis in 7,12-dimethylbenz(α)anthracene-induced rat mammary carcinoma by Arivazhagan L1, Sorimuthu Pillai S2.(PubMed)
(335) Effect of tangeretin, a polymethoxylated flavone on glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. by Sundaram R1, Shanthi P2, Sachdanandam P3.(PubMed)
(336) Effects of different drying methods on the antioxidant properties of leaves and tea of ginger specie by E.W.C. Chan, Y.Y. Lim, , S.K. Wong, K.K. Lim, S.P. Tan, F.S. Lianto, M.Y. Yong(Science direct)
(337) Effects of repeated androgen treatments on metabolism and nuclear binding of androgen in the infant murine submandibular gland by Katsukawa H1, Ninomiya Y, Funakoshi M.(PubMed)
(338) Curcumin inhibits formation of amyloid beta oligomers and fibrils, binds plaques, and reduces amyloid in vivo by Yang F1, Lim GP, Begum AN, Ubeda OJ, Simmons MR, Ambegaokar SS, Chen PP, Kayed R, Glabe CG, Frautschy SA, Cole GM.(PubMed)
(339) Phenolic anti-inflammatory antioxidant reversal of Abeta-induced cognitive deficits and neuropathology by Frautschy SA1, Hu W, Kim P, Miller SA, Chu T, Harris-White ME, Cole GM.(PubMed)
(340) Structure activity relationship study of curcumin analogues toward the amyloid-beta aggregation inhibitor by Endo H1, Nikaido Y1, Nakadate M1, Ise S1, Konno H2.(PubMed)
(341) Evaluation of anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferuloyl methane) in patients with postoperative inflammation by Satoskar RR, Shah SJ, Shenoy SG.(PubMed)
(342) Curcumin inhibits imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like inflammation by inhibiting IL-1beta and IL-6 production in mice by Sun J1, Zhao Y, Hu J.(PubMed)
(343) Relevance of the anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin in neurodegenerative diseases and depression by Tizabi Y1, Hurley LL2, Qualls Z3, Akinfiresoye L4.(PubMed)
(344) Neuroprotective and neurorescue effects of a novel polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NanoCurc™) in the neuronal cell culture and animal model: implications for Alzheimer's disease by Ray B1, Bisht S, Maitra A, Maitra A, Lahiri DK.(PubMed)
(345) Neuronal uptake and neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles on the human SK-N-SH cell line by Doggui S1, Sahni JK, Arseneault M, Dao L, Ramassamy C.(PubMed)
(346) The antioxidants curcumin and quercetin inhibit inflammatory processes associated with arthritis by Jackson JK1, Higo T, Hunter WL, Burt HM.(PubMed)
(347) In vitro antidiabetic and inhibitory potential of turmeric (Curcuma longa L) rhizome against cellular and LDL oxidation and angiotensin converting enzyme by Lekshmi PC1, Arimboor R1, Nisha VM1, Menon AN1, Raghu KG1.(PubMed)
(348) Water-soluble antioxidants improve the antioxidant and anticancer activity of low concentrations of curcumin in human leukemia cells by Chen J1, Wanming D, Zhang D, Liu Q, Kang, J.(PubMed)
(349) ROS-dependent prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) up-regulation and ceramide generation are the prime signaling events associated with curcumin-induced autophagic cell death in human malignant glioma by Thayyullathil F1, Rahman A1, Pallichankandy S1, Patel M1, Galadari S2.(PubMed)
(350) Autophagy as an essential cellular antioxidant pathway in neurodegenerative disease. by Giordano S1, Darley-Usmar V1, Zhang J2.(PubMed)
(351) Dietary curcumin ameliorates aging-related cerebrovascular dysfunction through the AMPK/uncoupling protein 2 pathway by Pu Y1, Zhang H, Wang P, Zhao Y, Li Q, Wei X, Cui Y, Sun J, Shang Q, Liu D, Zhu Z.(PubMed)
(352) Curcumin nanoparticles attenuate neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in experimental model of Huntington's disease by Sandhir R1, Yadav A, Mehrotra A, Sunkaria A, Singh A, Sharma S.(PubMed)
(353) Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 activity by 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose in murine macrophage cells. by Lee SJ1, Lee IS, Mar W.(353)
(354) 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and superoxide anion scavenging activity of Rhizophora mangle (L.) bar by Janet Calero Sánchez, Roberto Faure García, and Ma. Teresa Mitjavila Cors1(PubMed)
(355) In vitro antioxidant capacity and free radical scavenging evaluation of active metabolite constituents of Newbouldia laevis ethanolic leaf extract by Josiah Bitrus Habu and Bartholomew Okechukwu Ibeh(PMC)
(356) The antimicrobial, mechanical, physical and structural properties of chitosan-gallic acid films Xiuxiu Sun Wayne State University Zhe Wang School of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Jilin University, China Hoda Kadouh Wayne State University Kequan Zhou Wayne State University, kzhou@wayne.edu(Digital Common)
(357) Antibacterial activity and mode of action of ferulic and gallic acids against pathogenic bacteria by  Celeste Simões
(358) Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens by Nohynek LJ1, Alakomi HL, Kähkönen MP, Heinonen M, Helander IM, Oksman-Caldentey KM, Puupponen-Pimiä RH.(PubMed)
(359) Gallic Acid Induces the Apoptosis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo via the Regulation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways by Cheng-zhen Liang,1 Xin Zhang,1 Hao Li,1 Yi-qing Tao,1 Li-jiang Tao,1 Zi-ru Yang,1 Xiao-peng Zhou,1 Zhong-li Shi,2 andHui-min Tao(PMC)
(360) Gallic acid reduces cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human cervical cancer cells by BING ZHAO and MENGCAI HU(PMC)
(361) Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cell by Yong Lu,1,2 Feng Jiang,2 Hao Jiang,2 Kalina Wu,1 Xuguang Zheng,2 Yizhong Cai,3 Mark Katakowski,2 Michael Chopp,2,4 and Shing-Shun Tony To1(PMC)
(362) Antitumor effect of beta-elemene in non-small-cell lung cancer cells is mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. by Wang G1, Li X, Huang F, Zhao J, Ding H, Cunningham C, Coad JE, Flynn DC, Reed E, Li QQ.(PubMed)
(363) Puerarin attenuates cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress in vascular dementia rats induced by chronic ischemia by Jing Zhang,1,2 Wenshi Guo,3 Buxian Tian,3 Menghan Sun,1 Hui Li,2 Lina Zhou,2 Xueping Liu4(PMC)
(364) The many faces of α-synuclein: from structure and toxicity to therapeutic target by Hilal A. Lashuel,1 Cassia R. Overk,2 Abid Oueslati,1 and Eliezer Masliah2,3(PMC)
(365) The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2 by N.A. Maioli,1 A.C. Zarpelon,1 S.S. Mizokami,1 C. Calixto-Campos,1 C.F.S. Guazelli,1 M.S.N. Hohmann,1 F.A. Pinho-Ribeiro,1 T.T. Carvalho,1 M.F. Manchope,1 C.R. Ferraz,1 R. Casagrande,2 and W.A. Verri, Jr1(PMC)
(366) Anti-inflammatory activity of gallic acid by Kroes BH1, van den Berg AJ, Quarles van Ufford HC, van Dijk H, Labadie RP.(PubMed)
(367) Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative activities of organic fractions from the Mediterranean brown seaweed Cystoseira sedoides by Mhadhebi L1, Laroche-Clary A, Robert J, Bouraoui A.(PubMed)
(368) Rational discovery and development of a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant based on cinnamic acid scaffold by Teixeira J1, Soares P, Benfeito S, Gaspar A, Garrido J, Murphy MP, Borges F.(PubMed)
(369) Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of cinnamic acid derivatives by Sova M1.(PubMed)
(370) Cinnamon: a multifaceted medicinal plant by Rao PV1, Gan SH2.(PubMed)
(371) Cinnamon polyphenols attenuate the hydrogen peroxide-induced down regulation of S100β secretion by regulating sirtuin 1 in C6 rat glioma cells by Qin B1, Panickar KS2, Anderson RA3.(PubMed)
(372) Cinnamon polyphenols regulate S100β, sirtuins, and neuroactive proteins in rat C6 glioma cells by Qin B1, Panickar KS2, Anderson RA3.(PubMed)
(373) Cinnamon counteracts the negative effects of a high fat/high fructose diet on behavior, brain insulin signaling and Alzheimer-associated changes by Anderson RA1, Qin B2, Canini F3, Poulet L4, Roussel AM5.(PubMed)
(374) Cinnamon increases liver glycogen in an animal model of insulin resistance by Couturier K1, Qin B, Batandier C, Awada M, Hininger-Favier I, Canini F, Leverve X, Roussel AM, Anderson RA(PubMed)
(375) Inhibition of neuroinflammation by cinnamon and its main components by Ho SC1, Chang KS, Chang PW.(PubMed)
(376) Up-regulation of neurotrophic factors by cinnamon and its metabolite sodium benzoate: therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders by Jana A1, Modi KK, Roy A, Anderson JA, van Breemen RB, Pahan K.(PubMed)
(377) The effect of aqueous cinnamon extract on the apoptotic process in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells by Assadollahi V1, Parivar K, Roudbari NH, Khalatbary AR, Motamedi M, Ezatpour B, Dashti GR.(PubMed)
(378) Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFkappaB and AP1. by Kwon HK1, Hwang JS, So JS, Lee CG, Sahoo A, Ryu JH, Jeon WK, Ko BS, Im CR, Lee SH, Park ZY, Im SH.(PubMed)
(379) Lipid lowering effect of Cinnamomum zeylanicum in hyperlipidaemic albino rabbits by Javed I1, Faisal I, Rahman Z, Khan MZ, Muhammad F, Aslam B, Ahmad M, Shahzadi A.(PubMed)
(380) Ligustrazine derivatives. Part 5: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel ligustrazinyloxy-cinnamic acid derivatives as potent cardiovascular agents by Chen H1, Li G, Zhan P, Liu X.(PubMed)
(381) Roles for proteinases in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseas by Caroline A Owen(PubMed)
(382) Pharmacology of platelet inhibition in humans: implications of the salicylate-aspirin interaction GIOVANNI DE GAETANO, M.D., PH.D., CHIARA CERLETTI, PH.D., ELISABETrA DEJANA, PH.D., AND ROBERTO LATINI, M.D.(PLATELETS AND VASCULAR OCCLUSION)
(383) Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are absorbed from moderate and sustained doses of virgin olive oil in humans by Miró-Casas E1, Covas MI, Fitó M, Farré-Albadalejo M, Marrugat J, de la Torre R.(PubMed)
(384) Olive oil and its phenolic constituent tyrosol attenuates dioxin-induced toxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells via an antioxidant-dependent mechanism by Kalaiselvan I1, Dicson SM1, Kasi PD1.(PubMed)
(385) Evaluation of potential antigenotoxic, cytotoxic and proapoptotic effects of the olive oil by-product "alperujo", hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and verbascoside by Anter J1, Tasset I2, Demyda-Peyrás S1, Ranchal I3, Moreno-Millán M1, Romero-Jimenez M1, Muntané J3, Luque de Castro MD4, Muñoz-Serrano A1, Alonso-Moraga Á5.(PubMed)
(386) Phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of virgin olive oil. by Franco MN1, Galeano-Díaz T2, López O3, Fernández-Bolaños JG3, Sánchez J4, De Miguel C5, Gil MV6, Martín-Vertedor D1.(PubMed)
(387) Tyrosol exerts a protective effect against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in in vitro model of Parkinson's disease. by Dewapriya P1, Himaya SW, Li YX, Kim SK.(PubMed)
(388) Caffeic acid, tyrosol and p-coumaric acid are potent inhibitors of 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine induced neurotoxicity by Vauzour D1, Corona G, Spencer JP.(PubMed)
(389) Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol, two main components of olive oil, protect N2a cells against amyloid-β-induced toxicity. Involvement of the NF-κB signaling by St-Laurent-Thibault C1, Arseneault M, Longpré F, Ramassamy C.(PubMed)
(390) Olive oil biophenols and women's health by Fistonić I1, Situm M, Bulat V, Harapin M, Fistonić N, Verbanac D.(PubMed)
(391) Biological properties of olive oil phytochemicals. by Visioli F1, Galli C.(PubMed)
(392) Antiatherogenic components of olive oil. by Visioli F1, Galli C.(PubMed)
(393) The effect of olive oil on osteoporosis prevention by García-Martínez O1, Rivas A, Ramos-Torrecillas J, De Luna-Bertos E, Ruiz C.(PubMed)
(394) Olive oil in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis after artificial menopause. by Liu H1, Huang H1, Li B1, Wu D1, Wang F1, Zheng Xh1, Chen Q1, Wu B1, Fan X1.(PubMed)
(395) Cognitive health and Mediterranean diet: just diet or lifestyle pattern? by Yannakoulia M1, Kontogianni M1, Scarmeas N2.(PubMed)
(396) Employing Alzheimer disease animal models for translational research: focus on dietary components by Grossi C1, Ed Dami T, Rigacci S, Stefani M, Luccarini I, Casamenti F.(PubMed)
(397) Olive-oil-derived oleocanthal enhances β-amyloid clearance as a potential neuroprotective mechanism against Alzheimer's disease: in vitro and in vivo studies. by Abuznait AH1, Qosa H, Busnena BA, El Sayed KA, Kaddoumi A.(PubMed)
(398) Modulation of early stress-related biomarkers in cytoplasm by the antioxidants silymarin and quercetin using a cellular model of acute arsenic poisoning by Soria EA1, Eynard AR, Bongiovanni GA.(PubMed)
(399) Cytoprotective effects of silymarin on epithelial cells against arsenic-induced apoptosis in contrast with quercetin cytotoxicity by Soria EA1, Eynard AR, Bongiovanni GA.(PubMed)
(400) Hepatoprotective and in vivo antioxidant activities of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of Mucuna pruriens (Fabaceae) in antitubercular drugs and alcohol models by Obogwu MB1, Akindele AJ2, Adeyemi OO1.(PubMed)
(401) Silymarin, the antioxidant component and Silybum marianum extracts prevent liver damage. by Shaker E1, Mahmoud H, Mnaa S.(PubMed)
(402) Neuroprotective effect of silibinin in diabetic mice by Marrazzo G1, Bosco P, La Delia F, Scapagnini G, Di Giacomo C, Malaguarnera M, Galvano F, Nicolosi A, Li Volti G.(PubMed)
(403) Neuroprotective effect of silymarin in a MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease by Pérez-H J1, Carrillo-S C2, García E3, Ruiz-Mar G2, Pérez-Tamayo R4, Chavarría A5.(PubMed)
(404) Neuroprotective effect of pAkt and HIF-1 α on ischemia rats.by Liu BN1, Han BX1, Liu F1.(PubMed)
(405) Pre-treatment with silymarin reduces brain myeloperoxidase activity and inflammatory cytokines in 6-OHDA hemi-parkinsonian rats by Haddadi R1, Mohajjel Nayebi A, Brooshghalan SE.(PubMed)
(406) Galantamine for vascular cognitive impairment by Birks J1, Craig D.(PubMed)
(407) Rivastigmine for vascular cognitive impairment by Birks J1, McGuinness B, Craig D.(PubMed)
(408) Rivastigmine for Alzheimer's disease by Birks J1, Grimley Evans J, Iakovidou V, Tsolaki M, Holt FE.(PubMed)
(409) WITHDRAWN: Tacrine for Alzheimer's disease. by Qizilbash N1, Birks J, Lopez Arrieta J, Lewington S, Szeto S.(PubMed)
(410) Tacrine for Alzheimer's disease. by Qizilbash N1, Birks J, López-Arrieta J, Lewington S, Szeto, S.  (PubMed)
(411) Donepezil for mild cognitive impairment by Birks J1, Flicker L.(PubMed)
(412) Donepezil for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease by Birks J1, Harvey RJ.(PubMed)
(413) Efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms and functional impairment in Alzheimer disease: a meta-analysis by Trinh NH1, Hoblyn J, Mohanty S, Yaffe K.(PubMed)
(414) Persistent treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and/or memantine slows clinical progression of Alzheimer disease by Rountree SD1, Chan W, Pavlik VN, Darby EJ, Siddiqui S, Doody RS.(PubMed)
(415) Medications for Memory Loss( Alzheimer's association)
(416) Therapeutic Goals (ChE-Is)?(Alsonline)
(417) Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor(Wikipedia)
(418) Evaluating high-dose rivastigmine patch in severe Alzheimer's disease: analyses with concomitant memantine usage as a factor by Grossberg GT, Farlow MR, Meng X, Velting DM1.(PubMed)
(419) A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled withdrawal trial comparing memantine and antipsychotics for the long-term treatment of function and neuropsychiatric symptoms in people with Alzheimer's disease (MAIN-AD). by Ballard C1, Thomas A2, Gerry S3, Yu LM4, Aarsland D5, Merritt C6, Corbett A7, Davison C2, Sharma N2, Khan Z7, Creese B7, Loughlin P6, Bannister C6, Burns A8, Win SN9, Walker Z10; MAIN-AD investigators.(PubMed)
(420) Memantine is a clinically well tolerated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist--a review of preclinical data by Parsons CG1, Danysz W, Quack G.(PubMed)
(421) N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and memantine treatment for Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and Parkinson's disease by Olivares D1, Deshpande VK, Shi Y, Lahiri DK, Greig NH, Rogers JT, Huang X.(PubMed)
(422) Memantine for dementia by A Areosa Sastre, F Sherriff, R McShane(Cochran bibrary)
(423) memantine - oral, Namenda (cont.)(Medicinenet.comhttp://www.medicinenet.com/memantine-oral/page2.htm)
(424) Memantine(Wikipedia)
(425) Use of anticonvulsants as prophylaxis for seizures in patients on clozapine by Caetano D1.(PubMed)
(426) Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society by Moulin D, Boulanger A, Clark AJ, Clarke H, Dao T, Finley GA, Furlan A, Gilron I, Gordon A, Morley-Forster PK, Sessle BJ, Squire P, Stinson J, Taenzer P, Velly A, Ware MA, Weinberg EL, Williamson OD; Canadian Pain Society.(PubMed)
(427) Management of behavioral problems in Alzheimer's disease. BY Gauthier S1, Cummings J, Ballard C, Brodaty H, Grossberg G, Robert P, Lyketsos C.(PubMed)
(428) Synthesis, neuronal activity and mechanisms of action of halogenated enaminones by Edafiogho IO1, Qaddoumi MG2, Ananthalakshmi KV3, Phillips OA4, Kombian SB5.(PubMed)
(429) Postnatal disruption of the disintegrin/metalloproteinase ADAM10 in brain causes epileptic seizures, learning deficits, altered spine morphology, and defective synaptic functions by Prox J1, Bernreuther C, Altmeppen H, Grendel J, Glatzel M, D'Hooge R, Stroobants S, Ahmed T, Balschun D, Willem M, Lammich S, Isbrandt D, Schweizer M,Horré K, De Strooper B, Saftig P.(PubMed)
(430) Neurotoxicity of Amyloid β-Protein: Synaptic and Network Dysfunction(PMC)
(431) Epileptic seizures in AD patients. by Larner AJ1.(PubMed)
(432) Anticonvulsant Medication for Bipolar Disorder(WebMD)
(433) Anticonvulsant(Wikipedia)
(434) Classics in chemical neuroscience: diazepam (valium) by Calcaterra NE1, Barrow JC.(PubMed)
(435) Skeletal effects of central nervous system active drugs: anxiolytics, sedatives, antidepressants, lithium and neuroleptics by Vestergaard P1.(PubMed)
(436) Signalling pathways for transactivation by dexmedetomidine of epidermal growth factor receptors in astrocytes and its paracrine effect on neurons by Li B1, Du T, Li H, Gu L, Zhang H, Huang J, Hertz L, Peng L.(PubMed)
(437) Effects of synaptic modulation on beta-amyloid, synaptophysin, and memory performance in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice by Tampellini D1, Capetillo-Zarate E, Dumont M, Huang Z, Yu F, Lin MT, Gouras GK.(PubMed)
(438) Sedative(Wikipedia)
(439) Antidepressant-associated mood elevations in bipolar II disorder compared with bipolar I disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis by Bond DJ1, Noronha MM, Kauer-Sant'Anna M, Lam RW, Yatham LN.(PubMed)
(440) Orphan comparisons and indirect meta-analysis: a case study on antidepressant efficacy in dysthymia comparing tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors by using general linear models by Ballesteros J1.(PubMed)
(441) An open treatment trial of duloxetine in elderly patients with dysthymic disorder by Kerner N1, D'Antonio K2, Pelton GH1, Salcedo E3, Ferrar J3, Roose SP1, Devanand D1.(PubMed)
(442) Adding psychotherapy to antidepressant medication in depression and anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis by Cuijpers P1, Sijbrandij M, Koole SL, Andersson G, Beekman AT, Reynolds CF 3rd.(PubMed)
(443) The efficacy of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in treating depressive and anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis of direct comparisons by Cuijpers P1, Sijbrandij M, Koole SL, Andersson G, Beekman AT, Reynolds CF 3rd.(PubMed)
(444) Antidepressant use in Alzheimer's disease patients: results of the REAL.FR cohort by Arbus C1, Gardette V, Bui E, Cantet C, Andrieu S, Nourhashémi F, Schmitt L, Vellas B; REAL.FR Group.(PubMed)
(445) Depression health center: Coping With Side Effects of Depression Treatment(WebMD)
(446) [Diagnostics and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome patients with an alcohol abuse].[Article in Danish] by Nilsson M1, Sonne C.(PubMed)
(447) Complete recovery from undertreated Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following aggressive thiamine treatment by Paparrigopoulos T1, Tzavellas E, Karaiskos D, Kouzoupis A, Liappas I(PubMed).
(448) Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders. by Latt N1, Dore G.(PubMed)
(449) Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome: under-recognized and under-treated by Isenberg-Grzeda E1, Kutner HE, Nicolson SE.(PubMed)
(450) Thiamine for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in people at risk from alcohol abuse by Day E1, Bentham P, Callaghan R, Kuruvilla T, George S.(PubMed)
(451) Evolution of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in self-neglecting alcoholics: preliminary results of relation with Wernicke-delirium and diabetes mellitus by Wijnia JW1, van de Wetering BJ, Zwart E, Nieuwenhuis KG, Goossensen MA.(PubMed)
(452) [Diabetic coma and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. On the clinical significance of acquired thiamine deficiency].[Article in German]by Vieregge P, Stuhlmann W.(PubMed)
(453) Korsakoff's psychosis due to massive beer intake provoked by diabetes insipidus by Farr RW1, Blankenship DC, Viti A, Albrink MJ.(PubMed)
(454) Stage-dependent alterations of progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in an animal model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome by Vetreno RP1, Klintsova A, Savage LM.(PubMed)
(455) Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome(Healthline)
(456) Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinson’s Dementia(Healthguide.org)
(457) Frontal-subcortical circuitry and behavior by Bonelli RM1, Cummings JL.(PubMed)
(458) Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and management by Salawu FK1, Danburam A, Olokoba AB.(PubMed)
(459) Early Parkinson's disease and non-motor issues by Chaudhuri KR1, Naidu Y.(PubMed)
(460) Comparison of desipramine and cognitive/behavioral therapy in the treatment of elderly outpatients with mild-to-moderate depression by Thompson LW1, Coon DW, Gallagher-Thompson D, Sommer BR, Koin D.(PubMed)
(461) Efficacy and complications of polyethylene glycols for treatment of constipation in children: a meta-analysis by Chen SL1, Cai SR, Deng L, Zhang XH, Luo TD, Peng JJ, Xu JB, Li WF, Chen CQ, Ma JP, He YL.(PubMed)
(462) Effects of methylphenidate on fatigue and depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial by Kerr CW1, Drake J, Milch RA, Brazeau DA, Skretny JA, Brazeau GA, Donnelly JP.(PubMed)
(463) Pathological gambling in Parkinson disease is reduced by amantadine by Thomas A1, Bonanni L, Gambi F, Di Iorio A, Onofrj M.(PubMed)
(464) Amantadine in the treatment of pathological gambling: a case report by Pettorruso M1, Martinotti G, Di Nicola M, Onofrj M, Di Giannantonio M, Conte G, Janiri L.(PubMed)
(465) Pathological gambling in Parkinson disease is reduced by amantadine by Thomas A1, Bonanni L, Gambi F, Di Iorio A, Onofrj M.(PubMed)
(466) Long-term efficacy of donepezil for relapse of visual hallucinations in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. by Ukai K1, Fujishiro H, Iritani S, Ozaki N.(PubMed)
(467) Donepezil for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease by Birks J1, Harvey RJ.(PubMed)
(468) The effect of galantamine on brain atrophy rate in subjects with mild cognitive impairment is modified by apolipoprotein E genotype: post-hoc analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial by7 Prins ND1, van der Flier WA1, Knol DL2, Fox NC3, Brashear HR4, Nye JS5, Barkhof F6, Scheltens P7.(PubMed)
(469) Galantamine versus risperidone treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with probable dementia: an open randomized trial by Freund-Levi Y1, Jedenius E2, Tysen-Bäckström AC3, Lärksäter M3, Wahlund LO4, Eriksdotter M4.(PubMed)
(470) Treatment effect of memantine on survival in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia: a prospective study by Stubendorff K1, Larsson V2, Ballard C3, Minthon L2, Aarsland D4, Londos E2.(PubMed)
(471) Comparison of metabolic effects of aripiprazole, quetiapine and ziprasidone after 12 weeks of treatment in first treated episode of psychosis by Pérez-Iglesias R1, Ortiz-Garcia de la Foz V2, Martínez García O2, Amado JA3, Garcia-Unzueta MT4, Ayesa-Arriola R2, Suarez-Pinilla P5, Tabares-Seisdedos R6,Crespo-Facorro B2.(PubMed)
(472) Efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone in the treatment of early psychosis: a randomized, double-blind 52-week comparison by McEvoy JP1, Lieberman JA, Perkins DO, Hamer RM, Gu H, Lazarus A, Sweitzer D, Olexy C, Weiden P, Strakowski SD.(PubMed)
(473) Nonpharmacological treatment, fludrocortisone, and domperidone for orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson's disease by Schoffer KL1, Henderson RD, O'Maley K, O'Sullivan JD.(PubMed)
(474) [Reflex syncope and syncope secondary to orthostatic hypotension].[Article in German] by Simonis G1, Gerk U, Pabst F, Machetanz J, Spitzer SG, Schellong S.(PubMed)
(475) Domperidone in the management of orthostatic hypotension by Montastruc JL, Chamontin B, Senard JM, Rascol A.(PubMed)
(476) [Arterial hypertension with orthostatic hypotension caused by dysregulation of the baroreflex. Correction with domperidone and verapamil].[Article in French]by Chamontin B, Villeneuve A, Berlan M, Montastruc JL, Salvador M.(PubMed)
(477) Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction. by Akand M1, Gencer E, Yaman O, Erişgen G, Tekin D, Ozdiler E.(PubMed)
(478) Sublingual sildenafil in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: faster onset of action with less dose. by Deveci S1, Peşkircioğlu L, Aygün C, Tekin MI, Dirim A, Ozkardeş H.(PubMed)
(479) Ipratropium bromide spray as treatment for sialorrhea in Parkinson's disease. by Thomsen TR1, Galpern WR, Asante A, Arenovich T, Fox SH.(PubMed)
(480) The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Review Update: Treatments for the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease by Seppi K1, Weintraub D, Coelho M, Perez-Lloret S, Fox SH, Katzenschlager R, Hametner EM, Poewe W, Rascol O, Goetz CG, Sampaio C.(PubMed)
(481) Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease by Stocchi F1, Barbato L, Nordera G, Berardelli A, Ruggieri S.(PubMed)
(482) Daytime sleepiness and alertness in patients with Parkinson disease by Stevens S1, Cormella CL, Stepanski EJ.(PubMed)
(483) The impact of eszopiclone on sleep and cognition in patients with schizophrenia and insomnia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial by Tek C1, Palmese LB2, Krystal AD3, Srihari VH2, DeGeorge PC4, Reutenauer EL2, Guloksuz S2.(PubMed)
(484) A 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the effect of eszopiclone 2 mg on sleep/wake function in older adults with primary and comorbid insomnia by Ancoli-Israel S1, Krystal AD, McCall WV, Schaefer K, Wilson A, Claus R, Rubens R, Roth T.(PubMed)
(485) Melatonin in elderly patients with insomnia. A systematic review by Olde Rikkert MG1, Rigaud AS.(PubMed)
(486) Modafinil in the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness by Valentino RM1, Foldvary-Schaefer N.(PubMed)
(487) Modafinil : a review of its use in excessive sleepiness associated with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome and shift work sleep disorder by Keating GM1, Raffin MJ.(PubMed)
(488) Practice Parameter: Treatment of nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease
Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology by T. A.Zesiewicz, MD, FAAN, K. L. Sullivan, MSPH, I. Arnulf, MD, K. R. Chaudhuri, MD, J. C.Morgan, MD, PhD, G. S. Gronseth, MD, FAAN, J. Miyasaki, MD, MEd, FAAN, D. J. Iverson, MD, FAAN and W. J. Weiner, MD(Neurology)
(489) The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Review Update: Treatments for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease by Fox SH1, Katzenschlager R, Lim SY, Ravina B, Seppi K, Coelho M, Poewe W, Rascol O, Goetz CG, Sampaio C.(PubMed)
(490) Transdermal administration of piribedil reverses MPTP-induced motor deficits in the common marmoset by Smith LA1, Jackson MG, Bonhomme C, Chezaubernard C, Pearce RK, Jenner P.(PubMed)
(491) Clinical pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease by Deleu D1, Northway MG, Hanssens Y.(PubMed)
(492) Role and clinical utility of pramipexole extended release in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease by Hametner EM1, Seppi K, Poewe W.(PubMed)
(493) Pramipexole extended-release: a review of its use in patients with Parkinson's disease by Frampton JE1.(PubMed)
(494) Role of dopamine receptor agonists in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease. by Bonuccelli U1, Del Dotto P, Rascol O.(PubMed).
(495) Long-term, open-label, safety study of once-daily ropinirole extended/prolonged release in early and advanced Parkinson's disease by Makumi CW1, Asgharian A, Ellis J, Shaikh S, Jimenez T, VanMeter S.(PubMed)
(496) Pramipexole and its extended release formulation for Parkinson's disease by Fishman PS1.(PubMed)
(497) [Dopamine agonists in the treatment of motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease].[Article in Polish] by Sławek J1.(PubMed)
(498) Long-term safety and sustained efficacy of extended-release pramipexole in early and advanced Parkinson's disease by Hauser RA, Schapira AH, Barone P, Mizuno Y, Rascol O, Busse M, Debieuvre C, Fraessdorf M, Poewe W; Pramipexole ER Studies Group.(PubMed)
(499) A five-year study of the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with early Parkinson's disease who were treated with ropinirole or levodopa by Rascol O1, Brooks DJ, Korczyn AD, De Deyn PP, Clarke CE, Lang AE.(PubMed)
(500) Economic evaluation of ropinirole prolonged release for treatment of Parkinson's disease in the Netherlands by van Boven JF1, Novak A, Driessen MT, Boersma C, Boomsma MM, Postma MJ.(PubMed)
(501) Risk of heart failure following treatment with dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease patients by Perez-Lloret S1, Rey MV, Crispo J, Krewski D, Lapeyre-Mestre M, Montastruc JL, Rascol O.(PubMed)
(502) Interaction of pergolide with central dopaminergic receptors. by Goldstein M, Lieberman A, Lew JY, Asano T, Rosenfeld MR, Makman MH.(PubMed)
(503) Medical management of levodopa-associated motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease by Jankovic J1, Stacy M.(PubMed)
(504) [Rasagiline in monotherapy in patients with early stages of Parkinson's disease and in combined and adjunct therapy to levodopa with moderate and advanced stages].[Article in Spanish] by Pagonabarraga J1, Rodríguez-Oroz MC.(PubMed)
(505) Rasagiline: a review of its use in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. by McCormack PL1.(PubMed)
(506) Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: evidence for effectiveness and limitations from 12 years' experience. by Movement Disorder Group, Chan AY1, Yeung JH2, Mok VC1, Ip VH1, Wong A1, Kuo SH3, Chan DT4, Zhu XL4, Wong E4, Lau CK4, Wong RK5, Tang V6, Lau C1,Poon WS4.(PubMed)
(507) Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: subthalamic nucleus versus globus pallidus internus by Krause M1, Fogel W, Heck A, Hacke W, Bonsanto M, Trenkwalder C, Tronnier V.(PubMed)
(508) Bilateral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease induced corticobulbar syndrome and psychic akinesia avoidable by globus pallidus lesion combined with contralateral stimulation by Merello M1, Starkstein S, Nouzeilles MI, Kuzis G, Leiguarda R.(PubMed)
(509) Maintenance ECT in the treatment of PD. Therapy improves psychotic symptoms, physical function by Shulman RB1.(PubMed)
(510) Medicines & treatments centre(WebMD)
(511) Ritalin Side Effects Center(WebMD)
(512) Modafinil Side Effects(Drug.com)
(513) Human prion diseases: from Kuru to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by Sikorska B1, Liberski PP.(PubMed)
(514) An overview of human prion diseases by Imran M1, Mahmood S.(PubMed)
(515) Rapidly progressive dementia: prion diseases and other rapid dementias by Geschwind MD.(PubMed)
(516) Neuroimaging of rapidly progressive dementias, part 1: neurodegenerative etiologies by Degnan AJ1, Levy LM.(PubMed)
(517) Degeneration of skeletal muscle, peripheral nerves, and the central nervous system in transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type prion proteins by Westaway D1, DeArmond SJ, Cayetano-Canlas J, Groth D, Foster D, Yang SL, Torchia M, Carlson GA, Prusiner SB.(PubMed)
(518) Prion protein transgenes and the neuropathology in prion diseases by DeArmond SJ1, Prusiner SB.(PubMed)
(519) [Differential diagnosis of status epilepticus in intensive care: about one case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob].[Article in French] by Chauvin A1, Dubost JL2, Cleophax C2, Niclot P3, Thuong M2.(PubMed)
(520) Prion protein accumulation in eyes of patients with sporadic and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by Head MW1, Northcott V, Rennison K, Ritchie D, McCardle L, Bunn TJ, McLennan NF, Ironside JW, Tullo AB, Bonshek RE.(PubMed)
(521) Fast progressive memory loss in a 63-year-old man by De Smet K1, De Maeseneer M, Amir TY, De Mey J.(PubMed)
(522) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Fact Sheet(NIH)
(523) Accuracy of diagnostic criteria for sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease among rapidly progressive dementia by Tagliapietra M1, Zanusso G, Fiorini M, Bonetto N, Zarantonello G, Zambon A, Ermani M, Monaco S, Manara R, Cagnin A.(PubMed)
(524) Hereditary Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and fatal familial insomnia by Gambetti P1, Parchi P, Chen SG.(PubMed)
(525) Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and fatal familial insomnia: insights into phenotypic variability and disease pathogenesis. by Capellari S1, Strammiello R, Saverioni D, Kretzschmar H, Parchi P.;(PubMed)
(526) Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting as major depression by Jiang TT1, Moses H, Gordon H, Obah E.(PubMed)
(527) [Course of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in relatives of patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Disease][Article in German]by Riedemann C1, Zerr I, Kropp S, Otto A, Poser S, Herrmann C.(PubMed)
(528) Interleukin (IL) Protein Written by: The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica
(529) Interleukin 4 and interleukin 10 levels are elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by Stoeck K1, Bodemer M, Ciesielczyk B, Meissner B, Bartl M, Heinemann U, Zerr I.(PubMed)
(530) The role of inflammatory cytokines as key modulators of neurogenesis by Borsini A1, Zunszain PA1, Thuret S2, Pariante CM3.(PubMed)
(531) Role of COX-2 in inflammatory and degenerative brain diseases. by Minghetti L1(PubMed)
(532) Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in inflammatory and degenerative brain diseases by Minghetti L1.(PubMed)
(533)  Prostaglandins and cyclooxygenases in glial cells during brain inflammation by Tzeng SF1, Hsiao HY, Mak OT.(PubMed)
(534) Briton cured in CJD drug trial by ANDREW CHAPMAN, (Mail on line)
(535) Treatment of Giardiasis by Timothy B. Gardner and David R. Hill(PMC)
(536) Quinacrine treatment trial for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by Geschwind MD1, Kuo AL, Wong KS, Haman A, Devereux G, Raudabaugh BJ, Johnson DY, Torres-Chae CC, Finley R, Garcia P, Thai JN, Cheng HQ, Neuhaus JM, Forner SA, Duncan JL, Possin KL, Dearmond SJ, Prusiner SB, Miller BL.(PubMed)
(537) Safety and efficacy of quinacrine in human prion disease (PRION-1 study): a patient-preference trial by Collinge J1, Gorham M, Hudson F, Kennedy A, Keogh G, Pal S, Rossor M, Rudge P, Siddique D, Spyer M, Thomas D, Walker S, Webb T, Wroe S, Darbyshire J.(PubMed)
(538) Quinacrine treatment trial for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by Geschwind MD1, Kuo AL, Wong KS, Haman A, Devereux G, Raudabaugh BJ, Johnson DY, Torres-Chae CC, Finley R, Garcia P, Thai JN, Cheng HQ, Neuhaus JM, Forner SA, Duncan JL, Possin KL, Dearmond SJ, Prusiner SB, Miller BL.(PubMed)
(539) Compassionate use of quinacrine in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease fails to show significant effects by Haïk S1, Brandel JP, Salomon D, Sazdovitch V, Delasnerie-Lauprêtre N, Laplanche JL, Faucheux BA, Soubrié C, Boher E, Belorgey C, Hauw JJ, Alpérovitch A.(PubMed)
(540) gamma-Aminobutyric acid(Wikipedia)
(541) Alterations of neurotransmitter norepinephrine and gamma-aminobutyric acid correlate with murine behavioral perturbations related to bisphenol A exposure by Ogi H1, Itoh K2, Ikegaya H3, Fushiki S1.(PubMed)
(542) Social and neural determinants of aggressive behavior: pharmacotherapeutic targets at serotonin, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid systems by Miczek KA1, Fish EW, De Bold JF, De Almeida RM.(PubMed)
(543) Escalated aggressive behavior: dopamine, serotonin and GABA by de Almeida RM1, Ferrari PF, Parmigiani S, Miczek KA.(PubMed)
(544) Chronic subdural haematoma: modern management and emerging therapies by Kolias AG1, Chari A1, Santarius T1, Hutchinson PJ1.(PubMed)
(545) Acute subdural hematoma from bridging vein rupture: a potential mechanism for growth by Miller JD1, Nader R.(PubMed)
(546) Surgical management of traumatic acute subdural hematoma in adults: a review by Karibe H1, Hayashi T, Hirano T, Kameyama M, Nakagawa A, Tominaga T.(PubMed)
(547) Brain herniation induced by drainage of subdural hematoma in spontaneous intracranial hypotension by Chotai S1, Kim JH, Kim JH, Kwon TH.(PubMed)
(548) The influence of coagulopathy on outcome after traumatic subdural hematoma: a retrospective single-center analysis of 319 patients by Lemcke J1, Al-Zain F, von der Brelie C, Ebenau M, Meier(PubMed) 
(549)Acute Subdural Hematoma. Author: Alex Koyfman, MD; Chief Editor: Rick Kulkarni, MD more(Medscape))..
(550)[Analysis of prognostic factors for patients with traumatic acute subdural hematomas treated by surgery].[Article in Chinese]by Song C1, Ren X1, Zhao B1, Fu H1, Lin S2, Zhang Y1.(PubMed)
(551) Management and outcome of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematomas and pre-injury oral anticoagulation therapy by Senft C1, Schuster T, Forster MT, Seifert V, Gerlach R.(PubMed)
(552) Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the Subdural Evacuating Port System by Asfora WT, Klapper HB.(PubMed)
(553) Subdural Hematoma Treatment & Management. Author: Richard J Meagher, MD; Chief Editor: Helmi L Lutsep, MD more..(Medscape)
(554) Chronic subdural hematoma. Surgery or mannitol treatment by Gjerris F, Schmidt K.(PubMed)
(555) Mannitol in acute traumatic brain injury by Schrot RJ1, Muizelaar JP.(PubMed)
(556) Effect of neuroprotective N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists on increased intracranial pressure: studies in the rat acute subdural hematoma model by Kuroda Y1, Fujisawa H, Strebel S, Graham DI, Bullock R.(PubMed)
(557) Methylprednisolone(Wikipedia)
(558) Effects of intracarotid injection of methylprednisolone on cellular oedema after osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier in rats by Kozler P1, Pokorný J.(PubMed)
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(560) Anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural haematoma. by Ratilal BO1, Pappamikail L, Costa J, Sampaio C.(PubMed)
(561) Low incidence of seizures in patients with chronic subdural haematoma. by Ohno K1, Maehara T, Ichimura K, Suzuki R, Hirakawa K, Monma S.(PubMed)
(562) Epilepsy in chronic subdural haematoma by Rubin G1, Rappaport ZH.(PubMed)
(563) Rifampicin(Wikipedia)
(564) Use of drains versus no drains after burr-hole evacuation of chronic subdural haematoma: a randomised controlled trial by Santarius T1, Kirkpatrick PJ, Ganesan D, Chia HL, Jalloh I, Smielewski P, Richards HK, Marcus H, Parker RA, Price SJ, Kirollos RW, Pickard JD, Hutchinson PJ(PubMed)
(565) Acute subdural hemorrhage associated with rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia. by Kang SY1, Choi JC, Kang JH, Lee JS.(PubMed)
(566) A case of acute and severe thrombocytopenia due to readministration of rifampicin by Mori M1, Izawa K, Fujikawa T, Uenami T, Sugano T, Kagami S, Namba Y, Yano Y, Yoneda T, Kitada S, Kimura H, Yamaguchi T, Yokota S, Maekura R.(PubMed)
(567) An Unreported Clindamycin Adverse Reaction: Wrist Monoarthritis(IJPR)
(568) Craniotomy(Wikipedia)
(569) Acute subdural hemorrhage associated with rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia by Kang SY1, Choi JC, Kang JH, Lee JS.(PubMed)
(570) Chronic subdural haematoma treated by craniotomy, durectomy, outer membranectomy and subgaleal suction drainage. Personal experience in 39 patients by Mohamed EE1.(PubMed)
(571) NINDS Multi-Infarct Dementia Information Page(NIH)
(572) Vascular dementia: different forms of vessel disorders contribute to the development of dementia in the elderly brain. by Thal DR1, Grinberg LT, Attems J.(PubMed)
(573) [Vascular dementia: big effects of small lesions].[Article in French]by Gold G1, Kövari E.(PubMed)
(574) Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease and Multi-infarct Dementiaby William E. Reichman, MD.(Sagejournasl)
(575) The reversible dementias: do they reverse by Clarfield AM1.(PubMed)
(576) Vascular cognitive impairment: epidemiology, subtypes, diagnosis and management. by Black SE1.(PubMed)
(577) Clopidogrel to prevent blood clots (Grepid, Plavix)(Patient)
(578) Aspirin plus clopidogrel as secondary prevention after stroke or transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis by Zhang Q1, Wang C, Zheng M, Li Y, Li J, Zhang L, Shang X, Yan C.(PubMed)
(579) [Antiplatelet agents in secondary prevention of stroke].[Article in French]by De Gautard G, Perrier A.(PubMed)
(580) Bleeding complication with dual antiplatelet therapy: spontaneous uvula hematoma by Nicholas G. Kounis, MD PhD and Periklis Davlouros, MD PhD(PMC)
(581) The long-term effects of conventional and atypical antipsychotics in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease by Lopez OL, Becker JT, Chang YF, Sweet RA, Aizenstein H, Snitz B, Saxton J, McDade E, Kamboh MI, DeKosky ST, Reynolds CF 3rd, Klunk WE.(PubMed)
(582) Threat/control-override symptoms and emotional reactions to positive symptoms as correlates of aggressive behavior in psychotic patients by Nederlof AF1, Muris P, Hovens JE.(PubMed)
(583) Two subdomains of negative symptoms in psychotic disorders: established and confirmed in two large cohorts by Liemburg E1, Castelein S, Stewart R, van der Gaag M, Aleman A, Knegtering H; Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (GROUP) Investigators.(PubMed)
(584) Adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics : differential risk and clinical implications. by Haddad PM1, Sharma SG.(PubMed)
(585) Neurotransmitter precursor amino acids in the treatment of multi-infarct dementia and Alzheimer's disease by Meyer JS, Welch KM, Deshmukh VD, Perez FI, Jacob RH, Haufrect DB, Mathew NT, Morrell RM.(PubMed)
(586) Clonazepam treatment of multi-infarct dementia. by Smeraski PJ1.(PubMed)
(587) From high doses of oral rivastigmine to transdermal rivastigmine patches: user experience and satisfaction among caregivers of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease.[Article in English, Spanish]by Reñé R1, Ricart J2, Hernández B2; researchers in the Experience study.(PubMed)
(588) Different responses to rivastigmine in subcortical vascular dementia and multi-infarct dementia. by Moretti R1, Torre P, Antonello RM, Cazzato G, Pizzolato G.(PubMed)
(589) Rivastigmine for vascular cognitive impairment by Birks J1, McGuinness B, Craig D.(PubMed)
(590) Rivastigmine for vascular cognitive impairment. by Craig D1, Birks J.(PubMed)
(591) Ginkgo Biloba (bai guo) by Complementary and Alternative Healing University
(592) Ginkgo biloba(Wikipedia)
(593) The memory enhancing effects of a Ginkgo biloba/Panax ginseng combination in healthy middle-aged volunteers by Wesnes KA1, Ward T, McGinty A, Petrini O.(PubMed)
(594) [Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in improving episodic memory of patients with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial].[Article in Chinese]by Zhao MX1, Dong ZH, Yu ZH, Xiao SY, Li YM.(PubMed)
(595) A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 in a sample of cognitively intact older adults: neuropsychological findings by Mix JA1, Crews WD Jr.(PubMed)
(596) Effects of Ginkgo biloba administered after spatial learning on water maze and radial arm maze performance in young adult rats by Shif O1, Gillette K, Damkaoutis CM, Carrano C, Robbins SJ, Hoffman JR(PubMed)
(597) Modulation of cognitive performance following single doses of 120 mg Ginkgo biloba extract administered to healthy young volunteers by Kennedy DO1, Jackson PA, Haskell CF, Scholey AB.(PubMed)
(598) Differential, dose dependent changes in cognitive performance following acute administration of a Ginkgo biloba/Panax ginseng combination to healthy young volunteers by Kennedy DO1, Scholey AB, Wesnes KA.(PubMed)
(599) Acute cognitive effects of standardised Ginkgo biloba extract complexed with phosphatidylserine by Kennedy DO1, Haskell CF, Mauri PL, Scholey AB.(PubMed)
(600) Ginkgo biloba for cognitive impairment and dementia by Birks J1, Grimley Evans J.(PubMed)
(601) Ginkgo biloba for cognitive impairment and dementia by Birks J1, Grimley EV, Van Dongen, M.(PubMed) 
(602) Efficacy and adverse effects of ginkgo biloba for cognitive impairment and dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis by Tan MS1, Yu JT2, Tan CC3, Wang HF4, Meng XF3, Wang C3, Jiang T4, Zhu XC4, Tan L5.(PubMed)
(603) [Ginkgo leaves tablet improved the memory quotient of patients with mild cognitive impairment: a clinical observation].[Article in Chinese] by Yu ZH, Zhang CY, Pu BH, Xiao SY, Dong ZH, Li YM.(PubMed)
(604) Effects of Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) extract on neurogenesis associated with serum corticosterone and GABA in the mouse dentate gyrus by Yoo DY1, Choi JH, Kim W, Yoo KY, Lee CH, Yoon YS, Won MH, Hwang IK.(PubMed)
(605) Inhibitory activity of Melissa officinalis L. extract on Herpes simplex virus type 2 replication. by Mazzanti G1, Battinelli L, Pompeo C, Serrilli AM, Rossi R, Sauzullo I, Mengoni F, Vullo V.(PubMed)
(606) Melissa officinalis oil affects infectivity of enveloped herpesviruses. by Schnitzler P1, Schuhmacher A, Astani A, Reichling J.(PubMed)
(607) Comparison of the antibacterial activity of essential oils and extracts of medicinal and culinary herbs to investigate potential new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome by Thompson A1, Meah D, Ahmed N, Conniff-Jenkins R, Chileshe E, Phillips CO, Claypole TC, Forman DW, Row PE.(PubMed)
(608) β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis), Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines. by Amiel E1, Ofir R, Dudai N, Soloway E, Rabinsky T, Rachmilevitch S.(PubMed)
(609) Medicinal plants and dementia therapy: herbal hopes for brain aging by Perry E1, Howes MJ.(PubMed)
(610) Effects of lozenge containing lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat on electrical brain activity of volunteers by Dimpfel W1, Pischel I, Lehnfeld R.(PubMed)
(611) Attenuation of laboratory-induced stress in humans after acute administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm). by Kennedy DO1, Little W, Scholey AB.(PubMed)
(612) Anxiolytic effects of a combination of Melissa officinalis and Valeriana officinalis during laboratory induced stress by Kennedy DO1, Little W, Haskell CF, Scholey AB.(PubMed)
(613) Hyperactivity, concentration difficulties and impulsiveness improve during seven weeks' treatment with valerian root and lemon balm extracts in primary school children by Gromball J1, Beschorner F2, Wantzen C3, Paulsen U4, Burkart M5.(PubMed)
(614) Anti-stress effects of lemon balm-containing foods. by Scholey A1, Gibbs A2, Neale C3, Perry N4, Ossoukhova A5, Bilog V6, Kras M7, Scholz C8, Sass M9, Buchwald-Werner S10.(PubMed)
(615) Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) by Kennedy DO1, Scholey AB, Tildesley NT, Perry EK, Wesnes KA.(PubMed)
(616) Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of single doses of Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) with human CNS nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-binding properties by Kennedy DO1, Wake G, Savelev S, Tildesley NT, Perry EK, Wesnes KA, Scholey AB.(PubMed)
(617) Attenuation of laboratory-induced stress in humans after acute administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm) by Kennedy DO1, Little W, Scholey AB.(PubMed)
(618) Lavender oil suppresses indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity in human PBMC. by Gostner JM, Ganzera M, Becker K, Geisler S, Schroecksnadel S, Überall F, Schennach H, Fuchs D1(PubMed).
(619) Protein Drug Targets of Lavandula angustifolia on treatment of Rat Alzheimer's Disease. by Zali H1, Zamanian-Azodi M1, Rezaei Tavirani M2, Akbar-Zadeh Baghban A3.(PubMed)
(620) Aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) improves the spatial performance of a rat model of Alzheimer's disease by Kashani MS1, Tavirani MR, Talaei SA, Salami M.(PubMed)
(621) Effects of lavender oil inhalation on improving scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment in laboratory rats by Hritcu L1, Cioanca O, Hancianu M.(PubMed)
(622) Neuroprotective effects of inhaled lavender oil on scopolamine-induced dementia via anti-oxidative activities in rats by Hancianu M1, Cioanca O, Mihasan M, Hritcu L(PubMed)
(623) Biological activities of lavender essential oil. by Cavanagh HM1, Wilkinson JM.(PubMed)
(624) [The effect of lavender aromatherapy on cognitive function, emotion, and aggressive behavior of elderly with dementia].[Article in Korean] by Lee SY1.(PubMed)
(625) A randomised controlled trial of the use of aromatherapy and hand massage to reduce disruptive behaviour in people with dementia by Fu CY1, Moyle W, Cooke M.(PubMed)
(626) Lavender oil as a treatment for agitated behaviour in severe dementia: a placebo controlled study by Holmes C1, Hopkins V, Hensford C, MacLaughlin V, Wilkinson D, Rosenvinge H.(PubMed)
(627) The study protocol of a blinded randomised-controlled cross-over trial of lavender oil as a treatment of behavioural symptoms in dementia by van der Ploeg ES1, Eppingstall B, O'Connor DW(PubMed).
(628) Effect of aromatherapy on patients with Alzheimer's disease by Jimbo D1, Kimura Y, Taniguchi M, Inoue M, Urakami K.(PubMed)
(629) [The effect of lavender aromatherapy on cognitive function, emotion, and aggressive behavior of elderly with dementia].[Article in Korean] by Lee SY1.(PubMed)
(630) The effects of lavender oil inhalation on emotional states, autonomic nervous system, and brain electrical activity by Sayorwan W1, Siripornpanich V, Piriyapunyaporn T, Hongratanaworakit T, Kotchabhakdi N, Ruangrungsi N.(PubMed)
(631) The effects of lavender scent on dental patient anxiety levels: a cluster randomised-controlled trial by Kritsidima M1, Newton T, Asimakopoulou K.(PubMed)
(632) A case series on the use of lavendula oil capsules in patients suffering from major depressive disorder and symptoms of psychomotor agitation, insomnia and anxiety by Fißler M1, Quante A2.(PubMed)
(633) The effects of lavender and rosemary essential oils on test-taking anxiety among graduate nursing students by McCaffrey R1, Thomas DJ, Kinzelman AO.(PubMed)
(634) [Effects of lavender aromatherapy on insomnia and depression in women college students].[Article in Korean] by Lee IS1, Lee GJ.(PubMed)
(635) Huperzine A, a potential therapeutic agent for dementia, reduces neuronal cell death caused by glutamate by Ved HS1, Koenig ML, Dave JR, Doctor BP.(PubMed)
(636) Treatment with Huperzine A improves cognition in vascular dementia patients by Xu ZQ1, Liang XM, Juan-Wu, Zhang YF, Zhu CX, Jiang XJ.(PubMed)
(637) A phase II trial of huperzine A in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease by Rafii MS1, Walsh S, Little JT, Behan K, Reynolds B, Ward C, Jin S, Thomas R, Aisen PS; Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study.(PubMed)
(638) Huperzine A for Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials by Yang G1, Wang Y, Tian J, Liu JP.(PubMed)
(639) Huperzine A activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and enhances the nonamyloidogenic pathway in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model by Wang CY1, Zheng W, Wang T, Xie JW, Wang SL, Zhao BL, Teng WP, Wang ZY.(PubMed)
(640) Huperzine A alleviates synaptic deficits and modulates amyloidogenic and nonamyloidogenic pathways in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice by Wang Y1, Tang XC, Zhang HY.(PubMed)
(641) Reducing iron in the brain: a novel pharmacologic mechanism of huperzine A in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by Huang XT1, Qian ZM2, He X3, Gong Q3, Wu KC3, Jiang LR4, Lu LN3, Zhu ZJ3, Zhang HY5, Yung WH3, Ke Y6.(PubMed)
(642) Neuroprotective effects of huperzine A. A natural cholinesterase inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by Wang R1, Tang XC.(PubMed)
(643) Treatment with Huperzine A improves cognition in vascular dementia patients by Xu ZQ1, Liang XM, Juan-Wu, Zhang YF, Zhu CX, Jiang XJ.(PubMed)
(644) Huperzine a in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: a meta-analysis. by Xing SH1, Zhu CX2, Zhang R1, An L1.(PubMed)
(645) Huperzine a as potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease: an assessment on chemistry, pharmacology, and clinical studies by Ha GT1, Wong RK, Zhang Y.(PubMed)
(646) The psychopharmacology of huperzine A: an alkaloid with cognitive enhancing and neuroprotective properties of interest in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by Zangara A1.(PubMed)
(647) An update on huperzine A as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease by Little JT1, Walsh S, Aisen PS.(PubMed)
(648) Role of huperzine a in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by Desilets AR1, Gickas JJ, Dunican KC.(PubMed)
(649)-(658) (Omitted links)
(659) Trichoderma viride cellulase induces resistance to the antibiotic pore-forming peptide alamethicin associated with changes in the plasma membrane lipid composition of tobacco BY-2 cell by Mari Aidemark,1 Henrik Tjellström,2,3 Anna Stina Sandelius,3 Henrik Stålbrand,4 Erik Andreasson,5 Allan G Rasmusson,1 and Susanne Widell1(PMC)
(660) Use of the cryptogein gene to stimulate the accumulation of Bacopa saponins in transgenic Bacopa monnieri plants by Majumdar S1, Garai S, Jha S.(PubMed)
(661) Bacopa antifungal(PubMed)
(662) Phytotoxic and antimicrobial constituents of Bacopa monnieri and Holmskioldia sanguinea. by Chaudhuri PK1, Srivastava R, Kumar S, Kumar S.(PubMed)
(663) Bacopa asthma(PubMed)
(664) Bronchodilatory and cardiovascular effects of an ethanol extract of Bacopa monniera in anaesthetized rats by Dar A1, Channa S.(PubMed)
(665) Evaluation of memory enhancing clinically available standardized extract of Bacopa monniera on P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A in Sprague-Dawley rats. by Singh R1, Panduri J, Kumar D, Kumar D, Chandsana H, Ramakrishna R, Bhatta RS.(PubMed)
(666) Bacopa monniera Linn. as an antioxidant: mechanism of action. by Tripathi YB1, Chaurasia S, Tripathi E, Upadhyay A, Dubey GP.(PubMed)
(667) Antihyperglycemic activity of bacosine, a triterpene from Bacopa monnieri, in alloxan-induced diabetic rats by Ghosh T1, Maity TK, Singh J.(PubMed)
(668) Effect of Bacopa monniera and Azadirachta indica on gastric ulceration and healing in experimental NIDDM rats by Dorababu M1, Prabha T, Priyambada S, Agrawal VK, Aryya NC, Goel RK.(PubMed)
(669) Anti-inflammatory activity of Bacopa monniera in rodents. by Channa S1, Dar A, Anjum S, Yaqoob M, Atta-Ur-Rahman.(PubMed)
(670) Anti-inflammatory activity of Bacopa monniera in rodents by Channa S1, Dar A, Anjum S, Yaqoob M, Atta-Ur-Rahman(PubMed)
(671) Effects of Ginkgo biloba in dementia: systematic review and meta-analysis by Stefan Weinmann,1 Stephanie Roll,1 Christoph Schwarzbach,2 Christoph Vauth,2 and Stefan N Willich1(PMC)
(672) Neuropharmacological review of the nootropic herb Bacopa monnieri. by Aguiar S1, Borowski. T.(PubMed)
(673) An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal by Singh AG1, Kumar A, Tewari DD.(PubMed)
(674) Ethnobotanical treatment strategies against Alzheimer's disease. by Howes MJ1, Houghton PJ.(PubMed)
(675) Bacopa monniera extract reduces amyloid levels in PSAPP mice. by Holcomb LA1, Dhanasekaran M, Hitt AR, Young KA, Riggs M, Manyam BV.(PubMed)
(676) Ethnobotany and research on medicinal plants in India by Jain SK1.(PubMed)
(677) Bacopa monnieri ameliorates memory deficits in olfactory bulbectomized mice: possible involvement of glutamatergic and cholinergic systems by Le XT1, Pham HT, Do PT, Fujiwara H, Tanaka K, Li F, Van Nguyen T, Nguyen KM, Matsumoto K.(PubMed)
(678) Butea superba-induced amelioration of cognitive and emotional deficits in olfactory bulbectomized mice and putative mechanisms underlying its actions by Mizuki D1, Qi Z, Tanaka K, Fujiwara H, Ishikawa T, Higuchi Y, Matsumoto K.(PubMed)
(679) An acute, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of 320 mg and 640 mg doses of a special extract ofBacopa monnieri (CDRI 08) on sustained cognitive performance by Downey LA1, Kean J, Nemeh F, Lau A, Poll A, Gregory R, Murray M, Rourke J, Patak B, Pase MP, Zangara A, Lomas J, Scholey A, Stough C.(PubMed)
(680) An acute, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of 320 mg and 640 mg doses of Bacopa monnieri(CDRI 08) on multitasking stress reactivity and mood by Benson S1, Downey LA, Stough C, Wetherell M, Zangara A, Scholey A.(PubMed)
(681) Effects of a standardized Bacopa monnieri extract on cognitive performance, anxiety, and depression in the elderly: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial by Calabrese C1, Gregory WL, Leo M, Kraemer D, Bone K, Oken B.(PubMed)
(682) Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals by Kumar GP1, Khanum F.(PubMed)
(683) Neuroprotective herbs and foods from different traditional medicines and diets. by Iriti M1, Vitalini S, Fico G, Faoro F.(PubMed)
(684) Health benefits of herbs and spices: the past, the present, the future by Tapsell LC1, Hemphill I, Cobiac L, Patch CS, Sullivan DR, Fenech M, Roodenrys S, Keogh JB, Clifton PM, Williams PG, Fazio VA, Inge KE.(PubMed)
(685) Dampened neural activity and abolition of epileptic-like activity in cortical slices by active ingredients of spices by Pezzoli M1, Elhamdani A1, Camacho S2, Meystre J1, González SM3, le Coutre J4, Markram H1.(PubMed)
(686) Cannabinoids for pain in dementia: the good, the bad, and the ugly by Ahmed AI1, van den Elsen GA, van der Marck MA, Olde Rikkert MG.(PubMed)
(687) [Pain management for opioid-dependent patients: can cannabinoids be an option?].[Article in French] by Broers B.(PubMed)
(688) Cannabinoid agonists showing BuChE inhibition as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease by González-Naranjo P1, Pérez-Macias N1, Campillo NE1, Pérez C1, Arán VJ1, Girón R2, Sánchez-Robles E2, Martín MI2, Gómez-Cañas M3, García-Arencibia M3,Fernández-Ruiz J3, Páez JA4.(PubMed)
(689) Cannabinoid agonists showing BuChE inhibition as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease by González-Naranjo P1, Pérez-Macias N1, Campillo NE1, Pérez C1, Arán VJ1, Girón R2, Sánchez-Robles E2, Martín MI2, Gómez-Cañas M3, García-Arencibia M3,Fernández-Ruiz J3, Páez JA4.(PubMed)
(690) Resveratrol improves cognition and reduces oxidative stress in rats with vascular dementia. by Ma X1, Sun Z2, Liu Y1, Jia Y1, Zhang B1, Zhang J2.(PubMed)
(691) Resveratrol improves cognition and reduces oxidative stress in rats with vascular dementia. by Ma X1, Sun Z2, Liu Y1, Jia Y1, Zhang B1, Zhang J2.(PubMed)
(692) Effects of resveratrol on apoptosis in a rat model of vascular dementia by Sun ZK1, Ma XR2, Jia YJ2, Liu YR2, Zhang JW1, Zhang BA2.(PubMed)
(693) Resveratrol as a therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease by Ma T1, Tan MS2, Yu JT3, Tan L3.(PubMed)
(694) Therapeutic potential of resveratrol in Alzheimer's disease. by Vingtdeux V1, Dreses-Werringloer U, Zhao H, Davies P, Marambaud P.(PubMed)
(695) Roles of resveratrol and other grape-derived polyphenols in Alzheimer's disease prevention and treatment. by Pasinetti GM1, Wang J2, Ho L2, Zhao W2, Dubner L3.(PubMed)
(696) Effect of curcumin on brain insulin receptors and memory functions in STZ (ICV) induced dementia model of rat by Agrawal R1, Mishra B, Tyagi E, Nath C, Shukla R.(PubMed)
(697) A study of brain insulin receptors, AChE activity and oxidative stress in rat model of ICV STZ induced dementia by Agrawal R1, Tyagi E, Shukla R, Nath C.(PubMed)
(698) Insulin receptor signaling in rat hippocampus: a study in STZ (ICV) induced memory deficit model by Agrawal R1, Tyagi E, Shukla R, Nath C.(PubMed)
(699) GSK-3(Wikipedia)
(700) TCF/LEF family(Wikipedia)
(701) Cyclin D1(Wikipedia)
(702) The role of phytochemicals in the treatment and prevention of dementia. by Howes MJ1, Perry E.(PubMed)
(703) Crocetin attenuates spatial learning dysfunction and hippocampal injury in a model of vascular dementia by Tashakori-Sabzevar F1, Hosseinzadeh H, Motamedshariaty VS, Movassaghi AR, Mohajeri SA.(PubMed)
(704) Effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its active constituent, crocin, on recognition and spatial memory after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in rats by Hosseinzadeh H1, Sadeghnia HR, Ghaeni FA, Motamedshariaty VS, Mohajeri SA.(PubMed)
(705) Effects of saffron extract and its constituent crocin on learning behaviour and long-term potentiation by Abe K1, Saito H.(PubMed)
(706) Comparing the efficacy and safety of Crocus sativus L. with memantine in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease: a double-blind randomized clinical trial by Farokhnia M1, Shafiee Sabet M, Iranpour N, Gougol A, Yekehtaz H, Alimardani R, Farsad F, Kamalipour M, Akhondzadeh S.(PubMed)
(707) A 22-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of Crocus sativus in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease by Akhondzadeh S1, Shafiee Sabet M, Harirchian MH, Togha M, Cheraghmakani H, Razeghi S, Hejazi SS, Yousefi MH, Alimardani R, Jamshidi A, Rezazadeh SA,Yousefi A, Zare F, Moradi A, Vossoughi A.(PubMed)
(708) Non-ginsenoside nicotinic activity in ginseng species. by Lewis R1, Wake G, Court G, Court JA, Pickering AT, Kim YC, Perry EK.(PubMed)
(709) The role of phytochemicals in the treatment and prevention of dementia by Howes MJ1, Perry E.(PubMed)
(710) Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Property of Sage (Salvia) to Prevent and Cure Illnesses such as Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Dementia, Lupus, Autism, Heart Disease, and Cancer by Hamidpour M1, Hamidpour R2, Hamidpour S2, Shahlari M2.(PubMed)
(*) Traditional Chinese Medicine for Senile Dementia by Zhihong Lin,1 Jie Gu,1 Jin Xiu,1 Tingyan Mi,1 Jie Dong,1 and Jyoti Kumar Tiwari2(Hindawi)
(711) [Chemical constituents of surface layer of Poria cocos and their pharmacological properties (I)].[Article in Chinese] by Feng YL1, Zhao YY, Ding F, Xi ZH, Tian T, Zhou F, Du X, Chen DQ, Wei F, Cheng XL, Lin RC.(PubMed)
(712) Chemical constituents and pharmacological properties of Poria cocos by Ríos JL1.(PubMed)
(713) Biological activities and potential health benefits of polysaccharides from Poria cocos and their derivatives. by Sun Y1.(PubMed)
(714) Antioxidant activity of carboxymethyl (1→3)-β-d-glucan (from the sclerotium of Poria cocos) sulfate (in vitro) by Wang Q1, Chen S2, Han L2, Lian M2, Wen Z2, Jiayinaguli T2, Liu L2, Sun R2, Cao Y3.(PubMed)
(715) [Clinical and experimental study on the treatment of children diarrhea by granule of children-diarrhea fast-stopping].[Article in Chinese] by Li YL1.(PubMed)
(716) Effects of triterpenoids from Poria cocos Wolf on the serotonin type 3A receptor-mediated ion current in Xenopus oocytes by Lee JH1, Lee YJ, Shin JK, Nam JW, Nah SY, Kim SH, Jeong JH, Kim Y, Shin M, Hong M, Seo EK, Bae H.(PubMed)
(717) Sclederma of Poria cocos exerts its diuretic effect via suppression of renal aquaporin-2 expression in rats with chronic heart failure by Wu ZL1, Ren H2, Lai WY3, Lin S1, Jiang RY1, Ye TC1, Shen QB1, Zeng QC3, Xu DL4.(PubMed)
(718) Anti-rejection effect of ethanol extract of Poria cocos wolf in rats after cardiac allograft implantation by Zhang GW1, Liu HY, Xia QM, Li JQ, Lü H, Zhang QH, Yao ZF.(PubMed)
(719) Chinese herbs for dementia diseases by Hügel HM1, Jackson N, May BH, Xue CC.(PubMed)
(720) Chinese herbs for memory disorders: a review and systematic analysis of classical herbal literature by May BH1, Lu C, Lu Y, Zhang AL, Xue CC.(PubMed)
(721) Chinese herbs for dementia diseases by Hügel HM1, Jackson N, May BH, Xue CC.(PubMed)
(722) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia.by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK.(PubMed)
(722a) Are herbal compounds the next frontier for alleviating learning and memory impairments? An integrative look at memory, dementia and the promising therapeutics of traditional chinese medicines by Jesky R1, Hailong C.(PubMed)
(723) Use of Yokukansan (TJ-54) in the treatment of neurological disorders: a review. by de Caires S1, Steenkamp V.(PubMed)
(724) Effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on memory disturbance and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in thiamine-deficient rats by Ikarashi Y1, Iizuka S, Imamura S, Yamaguchi T, Sekiguchi K, Kanno H, Kawakami Z, Yuzurihara M, Kase Y, Takeda S.(PubMed)
(725) Screening of Korean herbal medicines used to improve cognitive function for anti-cholinesterase activity by Oh MH1, Houghton PJ, Whang WK, Cho JH.(PubMed)
(726) Neuroprotective effect of Liuwei Dihuang decoction on cognition deficits of diabetic encephalopathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat. by Liu JP1, Feng L, Zhang MH, Ma DY, Wang SY, Gu J, Fu Q, Qu R, Ma SP.(PubMed)
(727) Liuwei Dihuang decoction facilitates the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in senescence accelerated mouse/prone 8 (SAMP8) hippocampal slices by inhibiting voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) and promoting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptors by Huang Y1, Zhang H, Yang S, Qiao H, Zhou W, Zhang Y(PubMed)
(728) Determination of the effectiveness of components of the herbal medicine Toki-Shakuyaku-San and fractions of Angelica acutiloba in improving the scopolamine-induced impairment of rat's spatial cognition in eight-armed radial maze test. by Hatip-Al-Khatib I1, Egashira N, Mishima K, Iwasaki K, Iwasaki K, Kurauchi K, Inui K, Ikeda T, Fujiwara M.(PubMed)
(729) A modified preparation (LMK03) of the oriental medicine Jangwonhwan reduces Abeta(1-42) level in the brain of Tg-APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease by Seo JS1, Jung EY, Kim JH, Lyu YS, Han PL, Kang HW.(PubMed)
(730) A modified preparation (LMK03) of the oriental medicine Jangwonhwan reduces Abeta(1-42) level in the brain of Tg-APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease by Seo JS1, Jung EY, Kim JH, Lyu YS, Han PL, Kang HW.(PubMed)
(731) A modified formulation of Chinese traditional medicine improves memory impairment and reduces Aβ level in the Tg-APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by Jeon S1, Bose S, Hur J, Jun K, Kim YK, Cho KS, Koo BS.(PubMed)
(732) First report of anti-Trichomonas vaginalis activity of the medicinal plant Polygala decumbens from the Brazilian semi-arid region, Caatinga by Frasson AP1, dos Santos O, Duarte M, da Silva Trentin D, Giordani RB, da Silva AG, da Silva MV, Tasca T, Macedo AJ.(PubMed)
(733) Potential antidepressant properties of Radix Polygalae (Yuan Zhi) by Liu P1, Hu Y, Guo DH, Wang DX, Tu HH, Ma L, Xie TT, Kong LY.(PubMed)
(734) High throughput screening of natural products for anti-mitotic effects in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells. by Mazzio E1, Badisa R, Mack N, Deiab S, Soliman KF.(PubMed)
(735) Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits by Hou Y1, Wang Y2, Zhao J1, Li X1, Cui J1, Ding J2, Wang Y3, Zeng X1, Ling Y4, Shen X5, Chen S2, Huang C4, Pei G6.(PubMed)
(736) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK.(PubMed)
(737) Neuroprotective effect of palmul-chongmyeong-tang on ischemia-induced learning and memory deficits in the rat. by Yun YJ1, Lee B, Hahm DH, Kang SK, Han SM, Lee HJ, Pyun KH, Shim I.(PubMed)
(738) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK. (PubMed)
(739) Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits by Hou Y1, Wang Y2, Zhao J1, Li X1, Cui J1, Ding J2, Wang Y3, Zeng X1, Ling Y4, Shen X5, Chen S2, Huang C4, Pei G6.(PubMed)
(740) Allele-specific silencing of mutant Huntington’s disease gene by Yu Zhang, Joshua Engelman, and Robert M. Friedlander*(PubMed)
(741) Alpha-synuclein(Wikipedia)
(742) Perivascular fat-mediated vascular dysfunction and remodeling through the AMPK/mTOR pathway in high-fat diet-induced obese rats by Liqun Ma1,2, Shuangtao Ma1,2, Hongbo He1, Dachun Yang1, Xiaoping Chen1, Zhidan Luo1, Daoyan Liu1 and Zhiming Zhu1(Hypertension research)
(743) Onjisaponin B derived from Radix Polygalae enhances autophagy and accelerates the degradation of mutant α-synuclein and huntingtin in PC-12 cells by Wu AG1, Wong VK, Xu SW, Chan WK, Ng CI, Liu L, Law BY.(PubMed)
(744) Trehalose, a novel mTOR-independent autophagy enhancer, accelerates the clearance of mutant huntingtin and alpha-synuclein by Sarkar S1, Davies JE, Huang Z, Tunnacliffe A, Rubinsztein DC.(PubMed)
(745) Polygalae radix inhibits toxin-induced neuronal death in the Parkinson's disease models. by Choi JG1, Kim HG, Kim MC, Yang WM, Huh Y, Kim SY, Oh MS.(PubMed)
(746) Huntington's disease: degradation of mutant huntingtin by autophagy by Sarkar S1, Rubinsztein DC.(PubMed)
(747) Cytoplasm(Wikipedia)
(748) What are Organelles?(Wisegreek)
(749) Onjisaponin B derived from Radix Polygalae enhances autophagy and accelerates the degradation of mutant α-synuclein and huntingtin in PC-12 cells by Wu AG1, Wong VK, Xu SW, Chan WK, Ng CI, Liu L, Law BY.(PubMed)
(750) PC12 cell line(Wikipedia)
(751) Natural anti-inflammatory products and leukotriene inhibitors as complementary therapy for bronchial asthma by Houssen ME1, Ragab A, Mesbah A, El-Samanoudy AZ, Othman G, Moustafa AF, Badria FA.(PubMed)
(752) Attenuation of allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma by Licochalcone A.by Chu X1, Jiang L, Wei M, Yang X, Guan M, Xie X, Wei J, Liu D, Wang D.(PubMed)
(753) Anti-ulcer and anti-oxidant activity of pepticare, a herbomineral formulation by Bafna PA1, Balaraman R.(PubMed)
(754) Anti-convulsant action and amelioration of oxidative stress by Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract in pentylenetetrazole- induced seizure in albino rats by Chowdhury B1, Bhattamisra SK, Das MC.(PubMed)
(755) Aqueous extracts and polysaccharides from liquorice roots (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) inhibit adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucosa by Wittschier N1, Faller G, Hensel A.(PubMed)
(756) Phytochemistry and biological properties of glabridin by Simmler C1, Pauli GF, Chen SN.(PubMed)
(757) Glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid directly modulate rat cardiac performance by Parisella ML1, Angelone T, Gattuso A, Cerra MC, Pellegrino D.(PubMed)
(758) Therapeutic associated with occupational exposure to silica by Raghuvanshi S1, Shrivastava S, Johri S, Shukla S.(PubMed)
(759) Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits by Hou Y1, Wang Y2, Zhao J1, Li X1, Cui J1, Ding J2, Wang Y3, Zeng X1, Ling Y4, Shen X5, Chen S2, Huang C4, Pei G6.(PubMed)
(760) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK.(PubMed)
(761) Vascular risk factors promote conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease by Li J, Wang YJ, Zhang M, Xu ZQ, Gao CY, Fang CQ, Yan JC, Zhou HD; Chongqing Ageing Study Group.(PubMed)
) (762) Protective effects of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. on the cognitive deficits caused by beta-amyloid peptide 25-35 in young mice by Ahn J1, Um M, Choi W, Kim S, Ha T.(PubMed)
(763) Treatment of vascular risk factors is associated with slower decline in Alzheimer disease.by Deschaintre Y1, Richard F, Leys D, Pasquier F.(PubMed).
(764) [In vitro experiment on scavenging oxy-radical and suppressing myocardial lipid peroxidation with sini decoction].[Article in Chinese] by Wu W1, Luo H, Hou C.(PubMed)
(765) [Anti-lipid peroxidation effects of sini decoction and its components on ischemic myocardium and the dose- and time-effects].[Article in Chinese] by Wu W1, Hou C, Luo H, Jin W, Luo C.(PubMed)
(766) Effectiveness of the Kampo kami-shoyo-san (TJ-24) for tremor of antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism by Ishikawa T1, Funahashi T, Kudo J.(PubMed)
(767) Four cases of panic disorder successfully treated with Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines: Kami-shoyo-san and Hange-koboku-to. by Mantani N1, Hisanaga A, Kogure T, Kita T, Shimada Y, Terasawa K.(PubMed)
(768) Liquiritin potentiate neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells by Chen ZA1, Wang JL, Liu RT, Ren JP, Wen LQ, Chen XJ, Bian GX.(PubMed)
(769) Neuroprotective effect of palmul-chongmyeong-tang on ischemia-induced learning and memory deficits in the rat. by Yun YJ1, Lee B, Hahm DH, Kang SK, Han SM, Lee HJ, Pyun KH, Shim I.(PubMed)
(770) Effects of Glycyrrhizae Radix on Repeated Restraint Stress-induced Neurochemical and Behavioral Responses. by Park HJ1, Shim HS, Kim H, Kim KS, Lee H, Hahm DH, Shim I.(PubMed)
(771) Ligustilide attenuates inflammatory pain via inhibition of NFκB-mediated chemokines production in spinal astrocytes by Zhao LX1, Jiang BC, Wu XB, Cao DL, Gao YJ.(PubMed)
(772) Analgesic effect and mechanism of the three TCM-herbal drug-combination Tou Feng Yu pill on treatment of migraine by Li JC1, Shen XF, Meng XL, Zhang Y, Lai XR.(PubMed)
(773) Can Hedysari Radix replace Astragali Radix in Danggui Buxue Tang, a Chinese herbal decoction for woman aliment? by Zhang WL1, Choi RC, Zhan JY, Chen JP, Luk WK, Yao P, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(774) [Recent pharmacological study on sanshengwan decoction].[Article in Chinese] by Wen RX1, Li W, Li Y, Cui CD, Yin XJ, Liao FL.(PubMed)
(775) Pharmacological effects of Radix Angelica Sinensis (Danggui) on cerebral infarction by Yi-Chian Wu1 and Ching-Liang Hsieh1,2,3(PMC)
(776) Scientific basis of botanical medicine as alternative remedies for rheumatoid arthritis. by Yang CL1, Or TC, Ho MH, Lau AS.(PubMed)
(777) Chinese herbs for dementia diseases. by Hügel HM1, Jackson N, May BH, Xue CC.(PubMed)
(778) Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits by Hou Y1, Wang Y2, Zhao J1, Li X1, Cui J1, Ding J2, Wang Y3, Zeng X1, Ling Y4, Shen X5, Chen S2, Huang C4, Pei G6.(PubMed)
(779) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK.(PubMed)
(780) Neuroprotective effect of palmul-chongmyeong-tang on ischemia-induced learning and memory deficits in the rat by Yun YJ1, Lee B, Hahm DH, Kang SK, Han SM, Lee HJ, Pyun KH, Shim I.(PubMed)
(781) Identification and comparative quantification of bio-active phthalides in essential oils from si-wu-tang, fo-shou-san, radix angelica and rhizoma chuanxiong by Tang Y1, Zhu M, Yu S, Hua Y, Duan JA, Su S, Zhang X, Lu Y, Ding A.(PubMed)
(782) Postischemic administration of Z-Ligustilide ameliorates cognitive dysfunction and brain damage induced by permanent forebrain ischemia in rats. by Kuang X1, Du JR, Liu YX, Zhang GY, Peng HY.(PubMed)
(783) Radix Angelica Sinensis that contains the component Z-ligustilide promotes adult neurogenesis to mediate recovery from cognitive impairment. by Xin J1, Zhang J, Yang Y, Deng M, Xie X.(PubMed)
(784) Ligustilide alleviates brain damage and improves cognitive function in rats of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. by Feng Z1, Lu Y, Wu X, Zhao P, Li J, Peng B, Qian Z, Zhu L.(PubMed)
(785) Protective effects of decursin and decursinol angelate against amyloid β-protein-induced oxidative stress in the PC12 cell line: the role of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes by Li L1, Li W, Jung SW, Lee YW, Kim YH.(PubMed)
(786) Decursinol and decursin protect primary cultured rat cortical cells from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. by Kang SY1, Kim YC.(PubMed)
(787) Four new neuroprotective dihydropyranocoumarins from Angelica gigas by Kang SY1, Lee KY, Sung SH, Kim YC.(PubMed)
(788) A modified preparation (LMK03) of the oriental medicine Jangwonhwan reduces Abeta(1-42) level in the brain of Tg-APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease by Seo JS1, Jung EY, Kim JH, Lyu YS, Han PL, Kang HW.(PubMed)
(789) Effect of ferulic acid and Angelica archangelica extract on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and dementia with Lewy bodies. by Kimura T1, Hayashida H, Murata M, Takamatsu J.(PubMed)
(790) Use of Yokukansan (TJ-54) in the treatment of neurological disorders: a review. by de Caires S1, Steenkamp V.(PubMed)
(791) Effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on memory disturbance and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in thiamine-deficient rats. by Ikarashi Y1, Iizuka S, Imamura S, Yamaguchi T, Sekiguchi K, Kanno H, Kawakami Z, Yuzurihara M, Kase Y, Takeda S.(PubMed)
(792) Neuroprotective effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in cultured cells by Kawakami Z1, Kanno H, Ueki T, Terawaki K, Tabuchi M, Ikarashi Y, Kase Y.(PubMed)
(793) Postischemic administration of Z-Ligustilide ameliorates cognitive dysfunction and brain damage induced by permanent forebrain ischemia in rats. by Kuang X1, Du JR, Liu YX, Zhang GY, Peng HY.(PubMed)
(794) Ligustilide alleviates brain damage and improves cognitive function in rats of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion by Feng Z1, Lu Y, Wu X, Zhao P, Li J, Peng B, Qian Z, Zhu L.(PubMed)
(795) Postischemic administration of Z-Ligustilide ameliorates cognitive dysfunction and brain damage induced by permanent forebrain ischemia in rats. by Kuang X1, Du JR, Liu YX, Zhang GY, Peng HY.(PubMed)
(796) Di Huang(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(797) HuangQin(Sen nong)
(798) Chinese herbs for dementia diseases. by Hügel HM1, Jackson N, May BH, Xue CC.(PubMed)
(799) Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits by Hou Y1, Wang Y2, Zhao J1, Li X1, Cui J1, Ding J2, Wang Y3, Zeng X1, Ling Y4, Shen X5, Chen S2, Huang C4, Pei G6.(PubMed)
(800) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia. by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK.(PubMed)
(801) Attenuating effect of a traditional korean formulation, Paeng-Jo-Yeon-Nyeon-Baek-Ja-In-Hwan (PJBH), on hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in PC12 cells BY Koo BS1, Kim YK, Park KS, Chung KH, Kim CH.(PubMed)
(802) Huperzine B, a novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates hydrogen peroxide induced injury in PC12 cells. by Zhang HY1, Tang XC.(PubMed)
(803) Neuroprotective effect of palmul-chongmyeong-tang on ischemia-induced learning and memory deficits in the rat. by Yun YJ1, Lee B, Hahm DH, Kang SK, Han SM, Lee HJ, Pyun KH, Shim I.(PubMed)
(804) Mechanism-based anti-anxiety effects of polysaccharides extracted from shudihuang (radix rehmanniae preparata) by two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis in rat hippocampus proteins. by Cui Y1, Rong C, Wang J, Cui C, Wang L, Feng Z, Feng J, Niu B.(PubMed)
(805) [Effect of shu di-huang on the expression of c-fos and NGF in hippocampi and learning and memory of rats damaged thalamic arcuate nucleus].[Article in Chinese] by Cui Y1, Hou SL, Yan ZH, Chang ZF.(PubMed)
(806) [Effect of shu di-huang on the transmitter and receptor of amino acid in brain and learning and memory of dementia model].[Article in Chinese] by Cui Y1, Yan ZH, Hou SL, Chang ZF.(PubMed)
(807) Autocrine motility factor receptor is involved in the process of learning and memory in the central nervous system. by Yang Y1, Cheng XR, Zhang GR, Zhou WX, Zhang YX.(PubMed)
(808) Detecting global and local hippocampal shape changes in Alzheimer's disease using statistical shape models. by Shen KK, Fripp J, Mériaudeau F, Chételat G, Salvado O, Bourgeat P; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.(PubMed)
(809) Memory impairments associated with hippocampal versus parahippocampal-gyrus atrophy: an MR volumetry study in Alzheimer's disease. by Köhler S1, Black SE, Sinden M, Szekely C, Kidron D, Parker JL, Foster JK, Moscovitch M, Winocour G, Szalai JP, Bronskill MJ.(PubMed)
(810) Health benefits of deer and elk velvet antler supplements: a systematic review of randomised controlled studies by Gilbey A1, Perezgonzalez JD.(PubMed)
(811) Elk velvet antler in rheumatoid arthritis: phase II trial. by Allen M1, Oberle K, Grace M, Russell A.(PubMed)
(812) The effects of velvet antler polypeptides on the phenotype and related biological indicators of osteoarthritic rabbit chondrocytes. by Zhang Z1, Liu X, Duan L, Li X, Zhang Y, Zhou Q.(PubMed)
(813) Deer antlers as a model of Mammalian regeneration. by Price J1, Faucheux C, Allen S.(PubMed)
(814) Growth and reproductive performance of sambar deer in Sabal Forest Reserve of Sarawak, Malaysia. by Dahlan I1, Dawend J.(PubMed)
(815) Deer Antler Velvet (Lu Rong)(Chinese herb healing)
(816) Mechanisms of Qi-blood circulation and Qi deficiency syndrome in view of blood and interstitial fluid circulation. by Yao W1, Yang H, Ding G.(PubMed)
(817) Kidneys(Traditional Chinese medicine basics)
(818) Liver(Inner body)
(819) [Research about formulas for activating blood and resolving stasis Xuesaitong capsule regulate CD117+ hemopoietic stem cell to produce new blood].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang BX, Zhang JS, Du MM, Zhang YY, Zhu HF.(PubMed)
(820) Eucommia Bark(Dallas Acupuncture Works)
(821) DU ZHONG(Four flowers)
(822) Ba Ji Tian(TCMwiki)
(823) Ba ji tian(Complementary and Alternative Healing University),
(824) Rou Cong Rong(TCMcure)
(825) Rou Cong Rong(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(826) Overcome Infertility - How to Treat Cold Uterus in The Yang Phrase Of Menstrual Cycle by Kyle J. Norton
(827) Bu Gu Zhi(TCMWiki)
(828) Bu Gu Zhi(Qiherbal)
(829) Bu Gu Zhi(Plantcures)
(830) Bu Gu Zhi Psoralea Fruit - Chinese Herbal Medicine
(831) BU GU ZHI(Fourflowers)
(832) Neuroprotective action of deer bone extract against glutamate or Aβ₁₋₄₂-induced oxidative stress in mouse hippocampal cells. by Kim CR1, Jeon HL, Shin SK, Kim HJ, Ahn CW, Jung SU, Park SH, Kim MR.(PubMed)
(833) Inhibitory Effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark on Scopolamine-Induced Learning and Memory Deficits in Mice. by Kwon SH1, Ma SX1, Joo HJ1, Lee SY1, Jang CG1.(PubMed)
(834) Neuroprotective effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark on amyloid beta(25-35)-induced learning and memory impairments in mice by Kwon SH1, Lee HK, Kim JA, Hong SI, Kim SY, Jo TH, Park YI, Lee CK, Kim YB, Lee SY, Jang CG.(PubMed)
(835) Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. bark. attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal cell death through inhibition of oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. by Kwon SH1, Ma SX1, Hong SI1, Kim SY2, Lee SY1, Jang CG3.(PubMed)
(836) [Antidepressant active constituents in the roots of Morinda officinalis How].[Article in Chinese] by Cui C1, Yang M, Yao Z, Cao B, Luo Z, Xu Y, Chen Y.(PubMed)
(837) The effect of Morinda officinalis How, a Chinese traditional medicinal plant, on the DRL 72-s schedule in rats and the forced swimming test in mice by Zhong-Qi Zhang, , Li Yuan, Ming Yang, Zhi-Pu Luo, Yi-Min Zhao(Sciencedirect)
(838) Cistanches Herba enhances learning and memory by inducing nerve growth factor. byChoi JG1, Moon M, Jeong HU, Kim MC, Kim SY, Oh MS.(PubMed)
(839) The multi-herbal medicine Gongjin-dan enhances memory and learning tasks via NGF regulation. by Moon E1, Her Y, Lee JB, Park JH, Lee EH, Kim SH, Oh MS, Jang CG, Kim SY.(PubMed)
(840) [Effective Components of three kinds of shen-supplementing Chinese medicine on self-renewal and neuron-like differentiation of NSCs in AD mouse embryos: an experimental research].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang YL, Zhang LL, Song WS, Han WW, Huang JH, Zhou Z.(PubMed)
(841) Neuroprotective effects of Psoralea corylifolia Linn seed extracts on mitochondrial dysfunction induced by 3-nitropropionic acid.by Im AR, Chae SW, Zhang GJ, Lee MY1.(PubMed)
(842) Folate deficiency in rat pups during weaning causes learning and memory deficits. by Berrocal-Zaragoza MI1, Sequeira JM1, Murphy MM2, Fernandez-Ballart JD2, Abdel Baki SG3, Bergold PJ3, Quadros EV1.(PubMed)
(843) Changes in brain tissue and behavior patterns induced by single short-term fasting in mice. by Hisatomi Y1, Asakura K, Kugino K, Kurokawa M, Asakura T, Nakata K.(PubMed)
(844) Combined low calcium and lack magnesium is a risk factor for motor deficit in mice. by Taniguchi R1, Nakagawasai O, Tan-no K, Yamadera F, Nemoto W, Sato S, Yaoita F, Tadano T.(PubMed)
(845) Antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities of salvianolic acid A by Fan HY1, Fu FH, Yang MY, Xu H, Zhang AH, Liu K.(PubMed)
(846) The anti-hypertensive effect of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) and Gegen (Pueraria lobata) formula in rats and its underlying mechanisms of vasorelaxation. byb Ng CF1, Koon CM, Cheung DW, Lam MY, Leung PC, Lau CB, Fung KP.(PubMed)
(847) [Roles of reactive oxygen species in Streptomyces pactum Act12-induced tanshinone production in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots].[Article in Chinese] by Yan Y, Zhao X, Zhang SC, Liu Y, Liang ZS.(PubMed)
(848) [Clinical observation of treating 62 patients with severe aplastic anemia failing in immunosuppressive therapy by integrative medicine].[Article in Chinese] by Su EY1, Fang YH, Chen HS.(PubMed)
(849) Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis. by Chen Z1, Xu H2.(PubMed)
(850) The pharmacological effects of Salvia species on the central nervous system by Imanshahidi M1, Hosseinzadeh H.(PubMed)
(851) Danshen diversity defeating dementia by Hügel HM1, Jackson N2.(PubMed)
(852) Salvianolic acid B inhibits Abeta fibril formation and disaggregates preformed fibrils and protects against Abeta-induced cytotoxicty. by Durairajan SS1, Yuan Q, Xie L, Chan WS, Kum WF, Koo I, Liu C, Song Y, Huang JD, Klein WL, Li M.(PubMed)
(853) [Comparison of the inhibitory activities of salvianolic acid B and Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 on neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide].[Article in Chinese] by Liu CS1, Hu JF, Chen NH, Zhang JT.(PubMed)
(854) [Comparison of the inhibitory activities of salvianolic acid B and Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 on neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide].[Article in Chinese] by Liu CS1, Hu JF, Chen NH, Zhang JT.(PubMed)
(855) Tanshinone IIA protects PC12 cells from β-amyloid(25-35)-induced apoptosis via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. by Dong H1, Mao S, Wei J, Liu B, Zhang Z, Zhang Q, Yan M.(PubMed)
(856) Cryptotanshinone, a compound from Salvia miltiorrhiza modulates amyloid precursor protein metabolism and attenuates beta-amyloid deposition through upregulating alpha-secretase in vivo and in vitro by Mei Z1, Zhang F, Tao L, Zheng W, Cao Y, Wang Z, Tang S, Le K, Chen S, Pi R, Liu P.(PubMed)
(857) Salvianolic acid A, a polyphenolic derivative from Salvia miltiorrhiza bunge, as a multifunctional agent for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. by Cao YY1, Wang L, Ge H, Lu XL, Pei Z, Gu Q, Xu J.(PubMed)
(858) Tanshinone IIA reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease by inhibiting iNOS, MMP‑2 and NF‑κBp65 transcription and translation in the temporal lobes of rat models of Alzheimer's disease. by Jiang P1, Li C1, Xiang Z2, Jiao B2.(PubMed)
(859) Effects of compound danshen tablets on spatial cognition and expression of brain beta-amyloid precursor protein in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease by Qin RA1, Yao XX, Huang ZY.(PubMed)
(860) Protective effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza injection against learning and memory impairments in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Cai H1, Lian L2, Wang Y2, Yu Y2, Liu W2.(PubMed)
(861) Targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1): structure-based design of MKP-1 inhibitors and upregulators by Doddareddy MR1, Rawling T, Ammit AJ.(PubMed)
(862) Ameliorating effects of HX106N, a water-soluble botanical formulation, on Aβ25-35-induced memory impairment and oxidative stress in mice. by Lee DS1, Choi J, Kim SH, Kim S.(PubMed)
(863) Ethanol extract of Astragali Radix and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix, Myelophil, exerts anti-amnesic effect in a mouse model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits. by Lee JS1, Kim HG1, Han JM1, Kim DW2, Yi MH2, Son SW3, Kim YA1, Lee JS4, Choi MK1, Son CG5.(PubMed)
(864) Tanshinone congeners improve memory impairments induced by scopolamine on passive avoidance tasks in mice by Kim DH1, Jeon SJ, Jung JW, Lee S, Yoon BH, Shin BY, Son KH, Cheong JH, Kim YS, Kang SS, Ko KH, Ryu JH.(PubMed)
(865) Neuroprotection against Aβ25-35-induced apoptosis by Salvia miltiorrhiza extract in SH-SY5Y cells by Yu H1, Yao L2, Zhou H3, Qu S1, Zeng X1, Zhou D1, Zhou Y1, Li X1, Liu Z4.(PubMed)
(866) Neuroprotective effects of salvianolic acid B on an Aβ25-35 peptide-induced mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. by Lee YW1, Kim DH, Jeon SJ, Park SJ, Kim JM, Jung JM, Lee HE, Bae SG, Oh HK, Son KH, Ryu JH.(PubMed)
(867) Cognitive dysfunctions induced by a cholinergic blockade and Aβ 25-35 peptide are attenuated by salvianolic acid B by Kim DH1, Park SJ, Kim JM, Jeon SJ, Kim DH, Cho YW, Son KH, Lee HJ, Moon JH, Cheong JH, Ko KH, Ryu JH.(PubMed)
(868) Immune system effects of echinacea, ginseng, and astragalus: a review by Block KI1, Mead MN.(PubMed)
(869) Effect of the combination of ginseng, oriental bezoar and glycyrrhiza on autonomic nervous activity and immune system under mental arithmetic stress. by Zheng A1, Moritani T.(PubMed)
(870) Protopanaxadiol, an active ginseng metabolite, significantly enhances the effects of fluorouracil on colon cancer by Wang CZ1, Zhang Z2, Wan JY3, Zhang CF4, Anderson S5, He X6, Yu C7, He TC8, Qi LW9, Yuan CS10.(PubMed)
(871) Panaxadiol, a purified ginseng component, enhances the anti-cancer effects of 5-fluorouracil human colorectal cancer cells. by Li XL1, Wang CZ, Mehendale SR, Sun S, Wang Q, Yuan CS.(PubMed)
(872) Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging. by Zhu J1, Mu X1, Zeng J2, Xu C1, Liu J1, Zhang M1, Li C1, Chen J3, Li T3, Wang Y1.(PubMed)
(873) Hormesis-based anti-aging products: a case study of a novel cosmetic by Rattan SI1, Kryzch V, Schnebert S, Perrier E, Nizard C.(PubMed)
(874) Anti-stress effects of Ginkgo biloba and Panax ginseng: a comparative study by Rai D1, Bhatia G, Sen T, Palit G.(PubMed)
(875) Proof of the mysterious efficacy of ginseng: basic and clinical trials: clinical effects of medical ginseng, korean red ginseng: specifically, its anti-stress action for prevention of disease by Kaneko H1, Nakanishi K.(PubMed)
(876) Ginsenoside Rg3 improves erectile function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. by Liu T1, Peng YF, Jia C, Yang BH, Tao X, Li J, Fang X.(PubMed)
(877) Second look at the potential use of ginseng berry extract for treating erectile dysfunction by Watson DC1.(PubMed)
(878) Antidiabetic effects of malonyl ginsenosides from Panax ginseng on type 2 diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin by Liu Z1, Li W, Li X, Zhang M, Chen L, Zheng YN, Sun GZ, Ruan CC.(PubMed)
(879) Hypoglycemic effects of malonyl-ginsenosides extracted from roots of Panax ginseng on streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. by Liu Z1, Wang LJ, Li X, Hu JN, Chen Y, Ruan CC, Sun GZ.(PubMed)
(880) [Effect of renshen jianxin capsule for alleviating insulin resistance in patients with coronary heart disease and glucose tolerance impairment].[Article in Chinese] by Li AM1, Zhao J.(PubMed)(881) [Effect of panax quinquefolius saponin on insulin sensitivity in patients of coronary heart disease with blood glucose abnormality].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang Y1, Lu S, Liu YY.(PubMed)
(882) The nootropic properties of ginseng saponin Rb1 are linked to effects on anxiety by Churchill JD1, Gerson JL, Hinton KA, Mifek JL, Walter MJ, Winslow CL, Deyo RA.(PubMed)
(883) Chronic oral administration of ginseng extract results in behavioral change but has no effects in mice models of affective and anxiety disorders by Einat H1.(PubMed)
(884) Effects of Korean red ginseng (Panax Ginseng Meyer) on bisphenol A exposure and gynecologic complaints: single blind, randomized clinical trial of efficacy and safety. vt Yang M1, Lee HS, Hwang MW, Jin M.(PubMed)
(885) Hypnotic effects and binding studies for GABA(A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors of traditional medicinal plants used in Asia for insomnia by Cho SM1, Shimizu M, Lee CJ, Han DS, Jung CK, Jo JH, Kim YM.(PubMed)
(886) The antidepressant effects and mechanism of action of total saponins from the caudexes and leaves of Panax notoginseng in animal models of depression by Xiang H1, Liu Y, Zhang B, Huang J, Li Y, Yang B, Huang Z, Xiang F, Zhang H.(PubMed)
(887) Antidepressant effects of ginseng total saponins in the forced swimming test and chronic mild stress models of depression. by Dang H1, Chen Y, Liu X, Wang Q, Wang L, Jia W, Wang Y.(PubMed)
(888) Potential neuroprotective activity of Ginseng in Parkinson's disease: a review by González-Burgos E1, Fernandez-Moriano C, Gómez-Serranillos MP.(PubMed)
(889) Panax ginseng is neuroprotective in a novel progressive model of Parkinson's disease by Van Kampen JM1, Baranowski DB2, Shaw CA3, Kay DG4.(PubMed)
(890) Effects of Panax ginseng in Neurodegenerative Diseases. by Cho IH1.(PubMed)
(891) Ginseng and vaginal bleeding by Greenspan EM.(PubMed)
(892) Anticonvulsant activity of ginseng on seizures induced by chemical convulsants by Lian XY1, Zhang ZZ, Stringer JL.(PubMed)
(893) Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of ginsenosides in rats by Lian XY1, Zhang Z, Stringer JL.(PubMed)
(894) Ginseng in the treatment of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot study by Etemadifar M1, Sayahi F, Abtahi SH, Shemshaki H, Dorooshi GA, Goodarzi M, Akbari M, Fereidan-Esfahani M.(PubMed)
(895) Can ginseng alleviate cancer-related fatigue? by Viale PH.(PubMed)
(896) REN SHEN(TCM assistant)
(897) ren shen (ginseng)(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(898) Panax ginseng ginsenoside-Rg2 protects memory impairment via anti-apoptosis in a rat model with vascular dementia by Zhang G1, Liu A, Zhou Y, San X, Jin T, Jin Y.(PubMed)
(899) Ginsenoside Rh2 promotes nonamyloidgenic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein via a cholesterol-dependent pathway.by Qiu J1, Li W2, Feng SH3, Wang M3, He ZY4.(PubMed)
(900) Cerebrolysin decreases amyloid-beta production by regulating amyloid protein precursor maturation in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease. by Rockenstein E1, Torrance M, Mante M, Adame A, Paulino A, Rose JB, Crews L, Moessler H, Masliah E.(PubMed)
(901) Ginsenoside Rg5 improves cognitive dysfunction and beta-amyloid deposition in STZ-induced memory impaired rats via attenuating neuroinflammatory responses by Chu S1, Gu J2, Feng L3, Liu J4, Zhang M5, Jia X5, Liu M6, Yao D7.(PubMed)
(902) Comparative study of korean white, red, and black ginseng extract on cholinesterase inhibitory activity and cholinergic function. by Lee MR1, Yun BS, In OH, Sung CK.(PubMed)
(603) A combination extract of Renshen (Panax Ginseng), Yinyanghuo (Herba Epimedii Brevicornus), Yuanzhi (Radix Palygalae) and Jianghuang (Rhizoma Curcumae Longae) decreases glycogen synthase kinase 3beta expression in brain cortex of APPV7171 transgenic mice by Shi J1, Tian J, Zhang X, Zeng C, Wei M, Wang P, Wang Y.(PubMed)
(904) Cell cycle re-entry in Alzheimer's disease: a major neuropathological characteristic? by Lopes JP1, Oliveira CR, Agostinho P.(PubMed)
(905) Speech-language interventions in Alzheimer's disease. A functional communication approach. by Glickstein JK1, Neustadt GK.(PubMed)
(906) Designer receptors enhance memory in a mouse model of Down syndrome by Fortress AM1, Hamlett ED1, Vazey EM1, Aston-Jones G1, Cass WA2, Boger HA1, Granholm AC3.(PubMed)
(907) Isolation Housing Exacerbates Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathophysiology in Aged APP/PS1 Mice by Huang H1, Wang L1, Cao M1, Marshall C1, Gao J1, Xiao N1, Hu G1, Xiao M2(PubMed)
(908) Gintonin, a ginseng-derived lysophosphatidic acid receptor ligand, attenuates Alzheimer's disease-related neuropathies: involvement of non-amyloidogenic processing by Hwang SH1, Shin EJ, Shin TJ, Lee BH, Choi SH, Kang J, Kim HJ, Kwon SH, Jang CG, Lee JH, Kim HC, Nah SY.(PubMed)
(909) Effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on the expression of toll-like receptor 3, 4 and their signalling transduction factors in the NG108-15 murine neuroglial cell line by Zhao BS1, Liu Y2, Gao XY3, Zhai HQ4, Guo JY5, Wang XY6.(PubMed)
(910) Ginsenoside Rg1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses via the phospholipase C-γ1 signaling pathway in murine BV-2 microglial cells by Zong Y1, Ai QL, Zhong LM, Dai JN, Yang P, He Y, Sun J, Ling EA, Lu D.(PubMed)
(911) Notoginsenoside R1 attenuates amyloid-β-induced damage in neurons by inhibiting reactive oxygen species and modulating MAPK activation by Ma B1, Meng X1, Wang J1, Sun J1, Ren X2, Qin M1, Sun J1, Sun G3, Sun X4.(PubMed)
(912) Antioxidative effects of Panax notoginseng saponins in brain cells by Zhou N1, Tang Y2, Keep RF3, Ma X4, Xiang J5.(PubMed)
(613) Ginseng for cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review. by Lee MS1, Yang EJ, Kim JI, Ernst E.(PubMed)
(914) Phosphorylated α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease: correlation depends on disease severity. by Stewart T, Sossi V, Aasly JO, Wszolek ZK, Uitti RJ, Hasegawa K, Yokoyama T, Zabetian CP, Leverenz JB, Stoessl AJ, Wang Y, Ginghina C, Liu C, Cain KC,Auinger P, Kang UJ, Jensen PH, Shi M, Zhang J.(PubMed)
(915) Genetic associations of Nrf2-encoding NFE2L2 variants with Parkinson's disease - a multicenter study by von Otter M, Bergström P, Quattrone A, De Marco EV, Annesi G, Söderkvist P, Wettinger SB, Drozdzik M, Bialecka M, Nissbrandt H, Klein C, Nilsson M,Hammarsten O, Nilsson S, Zetterberg H.(PubMed)
(916) Association of Nrf2-encoding NFE2L2 haplotypes with Parkinson's disease. by von Otter M1, Landgren S, Nilsson S, Celojevic D, Bergström P, Håkansson A, Nissbrandt H, Drozdzik M, Bialecka M, Kurzawski M, Blennow K, Nilsson M,Hammarsten O, Zetterberg H.(PubMed)
(917) Voluntary control of facial musculature in Parkinson's disease. by Marneweck M1, Hammond G2.(PubMed)
(918) Discrimination and recognition of facial expressions of emotion and their links with voluntary control of facial musculature in Parkinson's disease by Marneweck M1, Palermo R1, Hammond G1.(PubMed)
(919) The intrinsic resting state voice network in Parkinson's disease by New AB1, Robin DA, Parkinson AL, Eickhoff CR, Reetz K, Hoffstaedter F, Mathys C, Sudmeyer M, Grefkes C, Larson CR, Ramig LO, Fox PT, Eickhoff SB.(PubMed)
(920) Effects of Stochastic Vestibular Galvanic Stimulation and LDOPA on Balance and Motor Symptoms in Patients With Parkinson's Disease by Samoudi G1, Jivegård M1, Mulavara AP2, Bergquist F3.(PubMed)
(921) Ginsenoside Rb1 inhibits fibrillation and toxicity of alpha-synuclein and disaggregates preformed fibrils. by Ardah MT1, Paleologou KE2, Lv G3, Menon SA1, Abul Khair SB1, Lu JH4, Safieh-Garabedian B5, Al-Hayani AA6, Eliezer D3, Li M7, El-Agnaf OM8(PubMed)
(922) Protection against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+)-induced apoptosis by water extract of ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) in SH-SY5Y cells by Hu S1, Han R, Mak S, Han Y.(PubMed)
(923) Therapeutic efficacy of the neuroprotective plant adaptogen in neurodegenerative disease (Parkinson's disease as an example). by Bocharov EV1, Ivanova-Smolenskaya IA, Poleshchuk VV, Kucheryanu VG, Il'enko VA, Bocharova OA.(PubMed)
(924) Ginsenosides protect striatal neurons in a cellular model of Huntington's disease. by Wu J1, Jeong HK, Bulin SE, Kwon SW, Park JH, Bezprozvanny I.(PubMed)
(925) Panax ginseng reduces oxidative stress and restores antioxidant capacity in aged rats by Ramesh T1, Kim SW, Hwang SY, Sohn SH, Yoo SK, Kim SK.(PubMed)
(926) Melatonin attenuates memory impairment induced by Klotho gene deficiency via interactive signaling between MT2 receptor, ERK, and Nrf2-related antioxidant potential by Shin EJ1, Chung YH1, Le HL1, Jeong JH1, Dang DK1, Nam Y1, Wie MB1, Nah SY1, Nabeshima Y1, Nabeshima T1, Kim HC1.(PubMed)
(927) Modulation of nitrergic signalling pathway by American ginseng attenuates chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive impairment, neuroinflammation, and biochemical alterations by Rinwa P1, Kumar A.(PubMed)
(928) Ginsenoside Rb1 protects hippocampal neurons from high glucose-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting GSK3β-mediated CHOP induction by Liu D1, Zhang H2, Gu W1, Liu Y2, Zhang M1.(PubMed)
(929) Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons by Liu D1, Zhang H, Gu W, Liu Y, Zhang M.(PubMed)
(930) -(939)
(940) Ginsenoside Rb1 protects hippocampal neurons from high glucose-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting GSK3β-mediated CHOP induction by Liu D1, Zhang H2, Gu W1, Liu Y2, Zhang M1.(PubMed)
(941) Modulation of nitrergic signalling pathway by American ginseng attenuates chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive impairment, neuroinflammation, and biochemical alterations by Rinwa P1, Kumar A.(PubMed)
(942) Potential neuroprotective activity of Ginseng in Parkinson's disease: a review by González-Burgos E1, Fernandez-Moriano C, Gómez-Serranillos MP.(PubMed)
(943) Panax ginseng is neuroprotective in a novel progressive model of Parkinson's disease by Van Kampen JM1, Baranowski DB2, Shaw CA3, Kay DG4.(PubMed)
(944) Neuroprotective actions of the ginseng extract G115 in two rodent models of Parkinson's disease by Van Kampen J1, Robertson H, Hagg T, Drobitch R.(PubMed)
(945) Ginseng ginsenoside pharmacology in the nervous system: involvement in the regulation of ion channels and receptors by Nah SY1.(PubMed)
(946) American Ginseng, xi yang shen(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(947) Anti-fatigue effects of proteins isolated from Panax quinquefolium. by Qi B1, Liu L1, Zhang H1, Zhou GX1, Wang S1, Duan XZ1, Bai XY1, Wang SM1, Zhao DQ2.(PubMed)
(948) American ginseng does not improve fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a single center randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot study. by Kim E1, Cameron M, Lovera J, Schaben L, Bourdette D, Whitham R.(PubMed)
(949) American Ginseng Extract (Panax quinquefolius L.) Is Safe in Long-Term Use in Type 2 Diabetic Patients. by Mucalo I1, Jovanovski E2, Vuksan V3, Božikov V4, Romić Z5, Rahelić D4.(PubMed)
(950) Therapeutic potential of ginseng in the management of cardiovascular disorders by Karmazyn M1, Moey M, Gan XT.(PubMed)
(951)North American ginseng exerts a neutral effect on blood pressure in individuals with hypertension by Stavro PM1, Woo M, Heim TF, Leiter LA, Vuksan V.(PubMed)
(952) Compound CVT-E002 attenuates allergen-induced airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness, in vivo by Ebeling C1, Wu Y, Skappak C, Gordon JR, Ilarraza R, Adamko DJ.(PubMed)
(953) Anti-amnesic effect of pseudoginsenoside-F11 in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease by Wang CM1, Liu MY, Wang F, Wei MJ, Wang S, Wu CF, Yang JY.(PubMed)
(954) [Neuroprotective effects of water extracts of American Ginseng on SH-SY5Y cells apoptosis induced by Abeta25-35].[Article in Chinese] by Hu SQ1, Yu HM, Liu TS, Yang DJ, Chen XZ, He CJ.(PubMed)
(955) HT1001, a proprietary North American ginseng extract, improves working memory in schizophrenia: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study by Chen EY1, Hui CL.(PubMed)
(956) Modulation of nitrergic signalling pathway by American ginseng attenuates chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive impairment, neuroinflammation, and biochemical alterations by Rinwa P1, Kumar A.(PubMed)
(957) Ginseng compounds may fight Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease(Northest Parkinson foundation)
(958) Ginseng Substances Fight Brain Disease In Rats(Bio space)
(959) Plants and phytochemicals for Huntington's disease by Sunayna Choudhary1, Puneet Kumar2, Jai Malik1(Phamarcognosy Review)
(960) Use of ginseng in medicine with emphasis on neurodegenerative disorders by Radad K1, Gille G, Liu L, Rausch WD.(PubMed)
(961) Neuroprotective effect of pseudoginsenoside-f11 on a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine by Wang JY1, Yang JY1, Wang F1, Fu SY1, Hou Y1, Jiang B1, Ma J1, Song C1, Wu CF1.(PubMed)
(962) Ginseng derivative ocotillol enhances neuronal activity through increased glutamate release: a possible mechanism underlying increased spontaneous locomotor activity of mice by Wang ZJ1, Sun L, Peng W, Ma S, Zhu C, Fu F, Heinbockel T.(PubMed)
(963) [Neuroprotective effects of water extracts of American Ginseng on SH-SY5Y cells apoptosis induced by Abeta25-35].[Article in Chinese] by Hu SQ1, Yu HM, Liu TS, Yang DJ, Chen XZ, He CJ.(PubMed)
(964) Protective effects of pseudoginsenoside-F11 on methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in mice. by Wu CF1, Liu YL, Song M, Liu W, Wang JH, Li X, Yang JY.(PubMed)
(965) Anti-amnesic effect of pseudoginsenoside-F11 in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. by Wang CM1, Liu MY, Wang F, Wei MJ, Wang S, Wu CF, Yang JY.(PubMed)
(966) Modulation of nitrergic signalling pathway by American ginseng attenuates chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive impairment, neuroinflammation, and biochemical alterations by Rinwa P1, Kumar A.(PubMed)
(967) Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects and phytochemicals of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) polyphenol enhanced extract by Wang Y1, Xiang L, Wang C, Tang C, He X.(PubMed)
(968) Mulberry extracts alleviate aβ 25-35-induced injury and change the gene expression profile in PC12 cells. by Song N1, Yang H2, Pang W3, Qie Z3, Lu H4, Tan L3, Li H3, Sun S3, Lian F5, Qin C6, Jiang Y3.(PubMed)
(969) Combined treatment of mulberry leaf and fruit extract ameliorates obesity-related inflammation and oxidative stress in high fat diet-induced obese mice by Lim HH1, Yang SJ, Kim Y, Lee M, Lim Y.(PubMed)
(970) [Primary study on protective effect of mulberry extracts on Abeta25-35-induced PC12 cells injury].[Article in Chinese] by Song N1, Pang W, Yang H, Tan L, Fu J, Li H, Jiang Y.(PubMed)
(971) Mulberry water extracts inhibit rabbit atherosclerosis through stimulation of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis via activating p53 and regulating both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways by Chan KC1, Ho HH, Lin MC, Wu CH, Huang CN, Chang WC, Wang CJ.(PubMed)
(972) Impact of polyphenolic components from mulberry on apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells by Chan KC1, Ho HH, Lin MC, Huang CN, Huang HP, Wang CJ.(PubMed)
(973) Effects of Panax notoginseng saponins on proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells by Xu L1, Liu JT, Liu N, Lu PP, Pang XM.(PubMed)
(974) Blueberry and mulberry juice prevent obesity development in C57BL/6 mice by Wu T1, Tang Q, Gao Z, Yu Z, Song H, Zheng X, Chen W.(PubMed)
(975) Sang Shen(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(976) Mulberry Fruit Extract Protects against Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in Animal Model of Vascular Dementia by Kaewkaen P1, Tong-Un T, Wattanathorn J, Muchimapura S, Kaewrueng W, Wongcharoenwanakit S.(PubMed)
(977) The Neuroprotective Potential of Cyanidin-3-glucoside Fraction Extracted from Mulberry Following Oxygen-glucose Deprivation by Bhuiyan MI1, Kim HB, Kim SY, Cho KO.(PubMed)
(978) Slow excitotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease. by Ong WY1, Tanaka K, Dawe GS, Ittner LM, Farooqui AA.(PubMed)
(979) Serum elevated gamma glutamyltransferase levels may be a marker for oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. by Yavuz BB1, Yavuz B, Halil M, Cankurtaran M, Ulger Z, Cankurtaran ES, Aytemir K, Ariogul S.(PubMed)
(981) Effects of caprylic triglyceride on cognitive performance and cerebral glucose metabolism in mild Alzheimer's disease: a single-case observation by Farah BA1.(PubMed)
(982) Plasma total cholesterol level as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: the Framingham Study. by Tan ZS1, Seshadri S, Beiser A, Wilson PW, Kiel DP, Tocco M, D'Agostino RB, Wolf PA.(PubMed)
(983) Antioxidant and cognitive promotion effects of anthocyanin-rich mulberry (Morus atropurpurea L.) on senescence-accelerated mice and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. by Shih PH1, Chan YC, Liao JW, Wang MF, Yen GC.(PubMed)(984) The Neuroprotective Potential of Cyanidin-3-glucoside Fraction Extracted from Mulberry Following Oxygen-glucose Deprivation by Bhuiyan MI1, Kim HB, Kim SY, Cho KO.(PubMed)
(985)  Biology of Parkinson's disease: pathogenesis and pathophysiology of a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder by Garrett E. Alexander, MD; PhD*(PMC)
(986) The role of oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease by Dias V1, Junn E, Mouradian MM.(PubMed)
(987) Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease by Jenner P1.(PubMed)
(988) Mulberry fruit protects dopaminergic neurons in toxin-induced Parkinson's disease models by Kim HG1, Ju MS, Shim JS, Kim MC, Lee SH, Huh Y, Kim SY, Oh MS.(PubMed)
(989) Neuroprotective effects of the cyanidin-3-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside isolated from mulberry fruit against cerebral ischemia by Kang TH1, Hur JY, Kim HB, Ryu JH, Kim SY.(PubMed)
(990) Enhancement of neuroprotection of mulberry leaves (Morus alba L.) prepared by the anaerobic treatment against ischemic damage by Kang TH1, Oh HR, Jung SM, Ryu JH, Park MW, Park YK, Kim SY.(PubMed)
(991) Memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus via induction of nerve growth factor by Kim HG1, Oh MS.(PubMed)
(992) Loss of Presenilin Function Causes Impairments of Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Followed by Age-Dependent Neurodegeneration, Carlos A Saura1, Se-Young Choi2, Vassilios Beglopoulos1, Seema Malkani1, Dawei Zhang1, 2, B.S.Shankaranarayana Rao3, Sumantra Chattarji3, Raymond J Kelleher III4,Eric R Kandel5, Karen Duff6, Alfredo Kirkwood2, Jie Shen, 1, (Science direct)
(993) Lost memories might be able to be restored, new UCLA study indicates(UCLA Newsroom)
(994) Neural stem cells improve memory in an inducible mouse model of neuronal loss. by Yamasaki TR1, Blurton-Jones M, Morrissette DA, Kitazawa M, Oddo S, LaFerla FM.(PubMed)
(995) Abeta(25-35)-induced memory impairment, axonal atrophy, and synaptic loss are ameliorated by M1, A metabolite of protopanaxadiol-type saponins by Tohda C1, Matsumoto N, Zou K, Meselhy MR, Komatsu K.(PubMed)
(996) The effects of bilateral vestibular loss on hippocampal volume, neuronal number, and cell proliferation in rats by Zheng Y1, Balabhadrapatruni S, Baek JH, Chung P, Gliddon C, Zhang M, Darlington CL, Napper R, Strupp M, Brandt T, Smith PF.(PubMed)
(907) Antioxidant and cognitive promotion effects of anthocyanin-rich mulberry (Morus atropurpurea L.) on senescence-accelerated mice and prevention of Alzheimer's disease by Shih PH1, Chan YC, Liao JW, Wang MF, Yen GC.(PubMed)
(998) An intracellular threonine of amyloid-β precursor protein mediates synaptic plasticity deficits and memory loss. by Lombino F1, Biundo F, Tamayev R, Arancio O, D'Adamio L.(PubMed)
(999) The effects of bilateral vestibular loss on hippocampal volume, neuronal number, and cell proliferation in rats by Zheng Y1, Balabhadrapatruni S, Baek JH, Chung P, Gliddon C, Zhang M, Darlington CL, Napper R, Strupp M, Brandt T, Smith PF.(PubMed)
(1000) Confirmation of the antispasmodic effect of shakuyaku-kanzo-to (TJ-68), a Chinese herbal medicine, on the duodenal wall by direct spraying during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography by Sakai Y1, Tsuyuguchi T, Ishihara T, Kato K, Tsuboi M, Ooka Y, Katsuura K, Ohara T, Takayama S, Kimura M, Kasanuki J, Ai M, Yokosuka O.(PubMed)
(1001) Objective assessment of the antispasmodic effect of shakuyaku-kanzo-to (TJ-68), a Chinese herbal medicine, on the colonic wall by direct spraying during colonoscopy by Ai M1, Yamaguchi T, Odaka T, Mitsuhashi K, Shishido T, Yan J, Seza A, Saisho H.(PubMed)
(1002) Moutan cortex radicis improves lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats through anti-inflammation by Fu PK1, Yang CY, Tsai TH, Hsieh CL.(PubMed)
(1003) Paeonol attenuates high-fat-diet-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits by anti-inflammatory activity by Li H1, Dai M, Jia W.(PubMed)
(1004) Antiallergic effect of the root of Paeonia lactiflora and its constituents paeoniflorin and paeonol. by Lee B1, Shin YW, Bae EA, Han SJ, Kim JS, Kang SS, Kim DH.(PubMed)
(1005) Growth-inhibiting, bactericidal, and urease inhibitory effects of Paeonia lactiflora root constituents and related compounds on antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori by Ngan LT1, Moon JK, Shibamoto T, Ahn YJ.(PubMed)
(1006) Peony root extract upregulates transthyretin and phosphoglycerate mutase in mouse cobalt focus seizure by Kajiwara K1, Sunaga K, Tsuda T, Sugaya A, Sugaya E, Kimura M.(PubMed)
(1007) Clinical efficacy of aconitum-containing traditional Chinese medicine for diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain by Feng L1, Liu WK, Deng L, Tian JX, Tong XL.(PubMed)
(1008) Anxiolytic-like effect of paeonol in mice. by Mi XJ1, Chen SW, Wang WJ, Wang R, Zhang YJ, Li WJ, Li YL.(PubMed)
(1009) [Effects of yishenjiangyafang on blood pressure and protecting renal function in RPH rats].[Article in Chinese] by Chen ML1, Liu WJ, Wang CY, Zhu XM, Yin JF, Wang DX, Liu P.(PubMed)
(1010) The protective effect of peony extract on acute myocardial infarction in rats by Mo X1, Zhao N, Du X, Bai L, Liu J.(PubMed)
(1011) Paeoniflorin protects against concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice. by Chen M1, Cao L2, Luo Y3, Feng X4, Sun L5, Wen M6, Peng S7.(PubMed)
(1012) [Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome by Chinese medicine and pharmacy: an analysis of data mining on experiences of experts].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang BH1, Gao R, Li ZH, Li BS, Wang FY, Tang XD.(PubMed)
(1013) Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Schisandra and Paeonia extracts in the treatment of asthma by Chen X1, Huang Y1, Feng J1, Jiang XF1, Xiao WF1, Chen XX1.(PubMed)
(1014) The effect of a traditional Chinese prescription for a case of lung carcinoma by Kamei T1, Kumano H, Iwata K, Nariai Y, Matsumoto T.(PubMed)
(1015) [Effect of a peony root preparation on the status of the insulin and hemostatic system in animals during development of alloxan diabetes].[Article in Russian] by Ul'ianov AM, Tarasov IuA, Liapina LA, Pastorova VE, Uspenskaia MS.(PubMed)
(1016) Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM) on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice by Kim JJ1, Choi J1, Lee MK2, Kang KY3, Paik MJ3, Jo SK4, Jung U4, Park HR4, Yee ST5.(PubMed)
(1018) Comparative pharmacokinetics of paeoniflorin in plasma of vascular dementia and normal rats orally administrated with Danggui-Shaoyao-San or pure paeoniflorin by Liu J1, Wang JS, Kong LY.(PubMed)
(1019) A traditional medicinal herb Paeonia suffruticosa and its active constituent 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucopyranose have potent anti-aggregation effects on Alzheimer's amyloid beta proteins in vitro and in vivo by Fujiwara H1, Tabuchi M, Yamaguchi T, Iwasaki K, Furukawa K, Sekiguchi K, Ikarashi Y, Kudo Y, Higuchi M, Saido TC, Maeda S, Takashima A, Hara M,Yaegashi N, Kase Y, Arai H.(PubMed)
(1020) Neuroprotective effect of paeoniflorin on cerebral ischemic rat by activating adenosine A1 receptor in a manner different from its classical agonists by Liu DZ1, Xie KQ, Ji XQ, Ye Y, Jiang CL, Zhu XZ.(PubMed)
(1021) Neuroprotective effects of paeoniflorin, but not the isomer albiflorin, are associated with the suppression of intracellular calcium and calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II in PC12 cells by Wang D1, Tan QR, Zhang ZJ.(PubMed)
(1022) Paeoniflorin inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells via suppressing reactive oxygen species-mediated PKCδ/NF-κB pathway.by Dong H1, Li R2, Yu C1, Xu T1, Zhang X1, Dong M3.(PubMed)
(1023) Paeonol attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling by Liu MH1, Lin AH1, Lee HF2, Ko HK3, Lee TS1, Kou YR1.(PubMed)
(1024) [Advance in studies on effect of paeoniflorin on nervous system].[Article in Chinese] by Hu ZY1, Xu L, Yan R, Huang Y, Liu G, Zhou WX, Zhang YX.(PubMed)
(1025) Paeonol increases levels of cortical cytochrome oxidase and vascular actin and improves behavior in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease by Zhou J1, Zhou L, Hou D, Tang J, Sun J, Bondy SC.(PubMed)
(1026) Paeoniflorin attenuates learning impairment of aged rats in operant brightness discrimination task by Ohta H1, Matsumoto K, Shimizu M, Watanabe H.(PubMed)
(1027) [Effects of total paeony glucosides on mRNA expressions of Toll receptors and interleukin-33 in the brain tissue of D-galactose induced aging rats: an experimental research].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang HY1, Liu ZJ, Chen ZW.(PubMed)
(1028) [Advance in studies on effect of paeoniflorin on nervous system].[Article in Chinese] by Hu ZY1, Xu L, Yan R, Huang Y, Liu G, Zhou WX, Zhang YX.(PubMed)
(1028a) Neuroprotective effect of paeoniflorin on cerebral ischemic rat by activating adenosine A1 receptor in a manner different from its classical agonists by Liu DZ1, Xie KQ, Ji XQ, Ye Y, Jiang CL, Zhu XZ.(PubMed)
(1029) Mechanism of 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity by Glinka Y1, Gassen M, Youdim MB.(PubMed)
(1030) Paeoniflorin inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells via suppressing reactive oxygen species-mediated PKCδ/NF-κB pathway by Dong H1, Li R2, Yu C1, Xu T1, Zhang X1, Dong M3.(PubMed)
(1031) Effects of the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa on mitochondria-mediated neuroprotection in an MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease by Kim HG1, Park G2, Piao Y3, Kang MS4, Pak YK3, Hong SP1, Oh MS5.(PubMed)
(1032) Protective effect of paeoniflorin against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells via Bcl-2/Bax signal pathway by Sun R1, Wang K, Wu D, Li X, Ou Y.(PubMed)
(1033) Polyphenols and neuroprotection against ischemia and neurodegeneration. by Lin B1.(PubMed)
(1034) Apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer disease: risk, mechanisms, and therapy by Chia-Chen Liu,1 Takahisa Kanekiyo,2 Huaxi Xu,1 and Guojun Bu1(PMC)
(1035) Increased A beta 42(43)-plaque deposition in early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease brains with the deletion of exon 9 and the missense point mutation (H163R) in the PS-1 gene by Ishii K1, Ii K, Hasegawa T, Shoji S, Doi A, Mori H.(PubMed)
(1036) Abeta-42 deposition precedes other changes in PS-1 Alzheimer's disease by Lippa CF, Nee LE, Mori H, St George-Hyslop P.(PubMed)
(1037) Peoniflorin attentuates Abeta((1-42))-mediated neurotoxicity by regulating calcium homeostasis and ameliorating oxidative stress in hippocampus of rats by Zhong SZ1, Ge QH, Li Q, Qu R, Ma SP.(PubMed)
(1038) A review of cognitive impairments in dementia with Lewy bodies relative to Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia by Metzler-Baddeley C1.(PubMed)
(1039) Paeoniflorin attenuates amyloid-beta peptide-induced neurotoxicity by ameliorating oxidative stress and regulating the NGF-mediated signaling in rats. by Lan Z1, Chen L2, Fu Q1, Ji W1, Wang S1, Liang Z1, Qu R3, Kong L4, Ma S5.(PubMed)
(1040) Paeoniflorin attenuates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced learning dysfunction and brain damage in rats by Liu J1, Jin DZ, Xiao L, Zhu XZ.(PubMed)
(1041) Effects of paeoniflorin on the cerebral infarction, behavioral and cognitive impairments at the chronic stage of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats by Xiao L1, Wang YZ, Liu J, Luo XT, Ye Y, Zhu XZ.(PubMed)
(1042) Paeonol attenuates neurotoxicity and ameliorates cognitive impairment induced by d-galactose in ICR mice by Zhong SZ1, Ge QH, Qu R, Li Q, Ma SP.(PubMed)
(1043) Danggui-Shaoyao-San ameliorates cognition deficits and attenuates oxidative stress-related neuronal apoptosis in d-galactose-induced senescent mice by Lan Z1, Liu J, Chen L, Fu Q, Luo J, Qu R, Kong L, Ma S.(PubMed)
(1044) Ameliorative effects of paeoniflorin, a major constituent of peony root, on adenosine A1 receptor-mediated impairment of passive avoidance performance and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus by Tabata K1, Matsumoto K, Murakami Y, Watanabe H.(PubMed)
(1045) Anti-infective and cytotoxic properties of Bupleurum marginatum by Ashour ML, El-Readi MZ, Hamoud R, Eid SY, El Ahmady SH, Nibret E, Herrmann F, Youns M, Tahrani A, Kaufmann D, Wink M1.(PubMed)
(1046) Reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis contributes to chemosensitization effect of saikosaponins on cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in cancer cells by Wang Q1, Zheng XL, Yang L, Shi F, Gao LB, Zhong YJ, Sun H, He F, Lin Y, Wang X.(PubMed)
(1047) Ethnoveterinary plant remedies used by Nu people in NW Yunnan of China by Shen S1, Qian J, Ren J.(PubMed)
(1048) Chai Hu(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1049) Use of Yokukansan (TJ-54) in the treatment of neurological disorders: a review by de Caires S1, Steenkamp V.(PubMed)
(1050) Effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on memory disturbance and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in thiamine-deficient rats by Ikarashi Y1, Iizuka S, Imamura S, Yamaguchi T, Sekiguchi K, Kanno H, Kawakami Z, Yuzurihara M, Kase Y, Takeda S.(PubMed)
(1051) Neuroprotective effects of total saikosaponins of Bupleurum yinchowense on corticosterone-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by Li ZY1, Guo Z, Liu YM, Liu XM, Chang Q, Liao YH, Pan RL.(PubMed)
(1052) Ethanol extract of Bupleurum falcatum Linne and saikosaponins inhibit neuroinflammation via inhibition of NF-κB by Park WH1, Kang S1, Piao Y1, Pak CJ1, Oh MS2, Kim J3, Kang MS1, Pak YK4.(PubMed)
(1053)
(1054) Neuroprotective effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in cultured cells by Kawakami Z1, Kanno H, Ueki T, Terawaki K, Tabuchi M, Ikarashi Y, Kase Y.(PubMed)
(1055) Ameliorative effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on learning and non-cognitive disturbances in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by Tabuchi M1, Yamaguchi T, Iizuka S, Imamura S, Ikarashi Y, Kase Y.(PubMed)
(1056) Effects of Yokukansan on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in regular treatment for Alzheimer's disease by Okahara K1, Ishida Y, Hayashi Y, Inoue T, Tsuruta K, Takeuchi K, Yoshimuta H, Kiue K, Ninomiya Y, Kawano J, Yoshida K, Noda S, Tomita S, Fujimoto M,Hosomi J, Mitsuyama Y.(PubMed)
(1057) Treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer-type dementia with Yokukansan in clinical practice. by Hayashi Y1, Ishida Y, Inoue T, Udagawa M, Takeuchi K, Yoshimuta H, Kiue K, Ninomiya Y, Kawano J, Sameshima T, Kawahara T, Goto I, Shudo K, Kurayama S, Nakamura J, Okahara K, Mitsuyama Y.(PubMed)
(1058) Are cholinesterase inhibitors effective in the management of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in Alzheimer's disease? A systematic review of randomized, placebo-controlled trials of donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine by Rodda J1, Morgan S, Walker Z.(PubMed)
(1059) Neuroprotective effect of yokukansan against cytotoxicity induced by corticosterone on mouse hippocampal neurons. by Nakatani Y1, Tsuji M2, Amano T3, Miyagawa K4, Miyagishi H4, Saito A4, Imai T4, Takeda K4, Ishii D4, Takeda H2.(PubMed)
(1060) Glycyrrhiza and Uncaria Hook contribute to protective effect of traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan against amyloid β oligomer-induced neuronal death. by Kanno H1, Kawakami Z, Iizuka S, Tabuchi M, Mizoguchi K, Ikarashi Y, Kase Y.(PubMed)
(1061) Improvement in delusions and hallucinations in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies upon administration of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine.
Iwasaki K1, Kosaka K, Mori H, Okitsu R, Furukawa K, Manabe Y, Yoshita M, Kanamori A, Ito N by Wada K, Kitayama M, Horiguchi J, Yamaguchi S, Takayama S,Fukuhara R, Ouma S, Nakano S, Hashimoto M, Kinoshita T.(PubMed)
(1062) An exploratory study of the efficacy and safety of yokukansan for neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease. by Hatano T1, Hattori N, Kawanabe T, Terayama Y, Suzuki N, Iwasaki Y, Fujioka T; Yokukansan Parkinson’s Disease Study Group.(PubMed)
(1063) Successful treatment with Yokukansan for behavioral and psychological symptoms of Parkinsonian dementia by Kawanabe T1, Yoritaka A, Shimura H, Oizumi H, Tanaka S, Hattori N.(PubMed)
(1064) New possibility of traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine as treatment for behavioral and psychiatric symptoms in dementia by Kung FC1, Ishii R, Liu HC, Takeda M.(PubMed)
(1065) A randomized cross-over study of a traditional Japanese medicine (kampo), yokukansan, in the treatment of the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia by Mizukami K1, Asada T, Kinoshita T, Tanaka K, Sonohara K, Nakai R, Yamaguchi K, Hanyu H, Kanaya K, Takao T, Okada M, Kudo S, Kotoku H, Iwakiri M, Kurita H, Miyamura T, Kawasaki Y, Omori K, Shiozaki K, Odawara T, Suzuki T, Yamada S, Nakamura Y, Toba K.(PubMed)
(1066) Yokukan-san: a review of the evidence for use of this Kampo herbal formula in dementia and psychiatric conditions. by Okamoto H1, Iyo M2, Ueda K3, Han C3, Hirasaki Y3, Namiki T3.(PubMed)
(1067) Pharmacological effects of "jutsu" (Atractylodis rhizome and Atractylodis lanceae rhizome) on 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI)-induced head twitch response in mice (I).
Murayama C1, Wang CC2, Michihara S3, Norimoto H4.(PubMed)
(1068) Effects of conjugated linoleic acid and high oleic acid safflower oil in the treatment of children with HPV-induced laryngeal papillomatosis: a randomized, double-blinded and crossover preliminary study. by Louw L1.(PubMed)
(1069) Dysregulation of KSHV replication by extracts from Carthamus tinctorius L by Lee H1, Cho H, Son M, Sung GH, Lee T, Lee SW, Jung YW, Shin YS, Kang H.(PubMed)
(1070) Possibility of fighting food borne bacteria by egyptian folk medicinal herbs and spices extracts by Tayel AA1, El-Tras WF.(PubMed)
(1071) Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of extract and two isolated flavonoids of Carthamus tinctorius L by Wang Y1, Chen P1, Tang C1, Wang Y1, Li Y1, Zhang H2.(PubMed)
(1072) Dietary treatments enriched in olive and safflower oils regulate seric and placental matrix metalloproteinases in maternal diabetes. by Martinez N1, Sosa M, Higa R, Fornes D, Capobianco E, Jawerbaum A.(PubMed)
(1073) Folic acid and safflower oil supplementation interacts and protects embryos from maternal diabetes-induced damage by Higa R1, Kurtz M, Mazzucco MB, Musikant D, White V, Jawerbaum A.(PubMed)
(1074) [Effects of Hengyan medicinal recipe on the regulation of immunity in patients with severe sepsis: a prospective clinical trial].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang ZH1, Zhou G, Gong X, Zhang R, Qu XG, Zeng C, Liu JL.(PubMed)
(1075) Towards a better understanding of medicinal uses of Carthamus tinctorius L. in traditional Chinese medicine: a phytochemical and pharmacological review by Zhou X1, Tang L1, Xu Y1, Zhou G1, Wang Z2.(PubMed)
(1077) [Effect of jiantai liquid on expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in uterus of mice with embryo implantation dysfunction induced by mifepristone].[Article in Chinese] by Liu YJ1, Huang GY, Yang MW, Gong P, Lu F.(PubMed)
(1078) [A clinical study of Safflower Yellow injection in treating coronary heart disease angina pectoris with Xin-blood stagnation syndrome].[Article in Chinese by Zhang Q1, Peng JH, Zhang XN.(PubMed)
(1079) [Analysis on anti-hepatoma effect of medicine invigorating blood circulation and eliminating blood stasis based on warm-pungent-liver efficiency network].[Article in Chinese] by Gu H, Ma L, Yuan B, Zhang YL, Wang Y, Qiao YJ.(PubMed)
(1080) Huangqi-Honghua combination and its main components ameliorate cerebral infarction with Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome by antioxidant action in rats by Cao J1, Chen Z2, Zhu Y1, Li Y1, Guo C1, Gao K1, Chen L1, Shi X1, Zhang X1, Yang Z3, Wen A4.(PubMed)
(1081) Huangqi-Honghua combination and its main components ameliorate cerebral infarction with Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome by antioxidant action in rats by Cao J1, Chen Z2, Zhu Y1, Li Y1, Guo C1, Gao K1, Chen L1, Shi X1, Zhang X1, Yang Z3, Wen A4.(PubMed)
(1082) Protective effects of Nicotiflorin on reducing memory dysfunction, energy metabolism failure and oxidative stress in multi-infarct dementia model rats by Huang JL1, Fu ST, Jiang YY, Cao YB, Guo ML, Wang Y, Xu Z.(PubMed)
(1083) Protective effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A on β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by Kong SZ1, Xian YF, Ip SP, Lai XP, Shi XG, Lin ZX, Su ZR.(PubMed)
(1084) Hydroxy-safflor yellow A inhibits neuroinflammation mediated by Aβ₁₋₄₂ in BV-2 cells by Zhang Z1, Wu Z2, Zhu X2, Hui X3, Pan J2, Xu Y4.(PubMed)
(1085) Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppresses inflammatory responses of BV2 microglia after oxygen-glucose deprivation by Li J1, Zhang S, Lu M, Chen Z, Chen C, Han L, Zhang M, Xu Y.(PubMed)
(1086) Carthamus red from Carthamus tinctorius L. exerts antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect against CCl(4)-induced liver damage in rats via the Nrf2 pathway by Wu S1, Yue Y, Tian H, Li Z, Li X, He W, Ding H.(PubMed)
(1087) Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid depletion activates caspases and decreases NMDA receptors in the brain of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by Calon F1, Lim GP, Morihara T, Yang F, Ubeda O, Salem N Jr, Frautschy SA, Cole GM.(PubMed)
(1088) Polyphenols and neuroprotection against ischemia and neurodegeneration by Lin B1.(PubMed)
(1089) Selective PCAF inhibitor ameliorates cognitive and behavioral deficits by suppressing NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation induced by Aβ in a model of Alzheimer's disease by Park SY1, Kim MJ2, Kim YJ2, Lee YH3, Bae D4, Kim S4, Na Y5, Yoon HG1.(PubMed)
(1090) Timing of neurodegeneration and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide deposition in the brain of aging kokanee salmon by Maldonado TA1, Jones RE, Norris DO.(PubMed)
(1091) Polyphenols and neuroprotection against ischemia and neurodegeneration by Lin B1.(PubMed)
(1092) Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: chemokines produced by astrocytes and chemokine receptors by Liu C1, Cui G2, Zhu M3, Kang X4, Guo H5(PubMed)
(1093) The evolving biology of microglia in Alzheimer's disease by Malm TM1, Jay TR, Landreth GE.(PubMed)
(1094) Hydroxy-safflor yellow A inhibits neuroinflammation mediated by Aβ₁₋₄₂ in BV-2 cells by Zhang Z1, Wu Z2, Zhu X2, Hui X3, Pan J2, Xu Y4.(PubMed)
(1095) Protective effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A on β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by Kong SZ1, Xian YF, Ip SP, Lai XP, Shi XG, Lin ZX, Su ZR.(PubMed)
(1096) Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppresses inflammatory responses of BV2 microglia after oxygen-glucose deprivation. by Li J1, Zhang S, Lu M, Chen Z, Chen C, Han L, Zhang M, Xu Y.(PubMed)
(1097) Hydroxy-safflor yellow A attenuates Aβ₁₋₄₂-induced inflammation by modulating the JAK2/STAT3/NF-κB pathway by Zhang ZH1, Yu LJ2, Hui XC3, Wu ZZ2, Yin KL2, Yang H4, Xu Y5.(PubMed)
(1098) Effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A on the activity and mRNA expression of four CYP isozymes in rats by Xu RA1, Xu ZS2, Ge RS3.(PubMed)
(1099) A Systematic, Integrated Study on the Neuroprotective Effects of Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Revealed by 1H NMR-Based Metabonomics and the NF-κB Pathwa by Yuanyan Liu, 1 , 2 Zeqin Lian, 1 Haibo Zhu, 1 Yinghong Wang, 1 ,* Shishan Yu, 1 ,* Tingting Chen, 1 Jing Qu, 1 Jianbei Li, 1Shuanggang Ma, 1 and Xianhong Chen 1(PMC)
(1100) Protective effect of isorhynchophylline against β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by Xian YF1, Lin ZX, Mao QQ, Ip SP, Su ZR, Lai XP.(PubMed)
(1101) Neuroprotection of hydroxysafflor yellow A in the transient focal ischemia: inhibition of protein oxidation/nitration, 12/15-lipoxygenase and blood-brain barrier disruption by Sun L1, Yang L, Xu YW, Liang H, Han J, Zhao RJ, Cheng Y.(PubMed)
(1102) Neuroprotective effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A against excitotoxic neuronal death partially through down-regulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors by Yang Q1, Yang ZF, Liu SB, Zhang XN, Hou Y, Li XQ, Wu YM, Wen AD, Zhao MG.(PubMed)
(1104) Dietary intake of unsaturated fatty acids modulates physiological properties of entorhinal cortex neurons in mice by Arsenault D1, Julien C, Chen CT, Bazinet RP, Calon F.(PubMed)
(1105) Protective effects of Nicotiflorin on reducing memory dysfunction, energy metabolism failure and oxidative stress in multi-infarct dementia model rats by Huang JL1, Fu ST, Jiang YY, Cao YB, Guo ML, Wang Y, Xu Z.(PubMed)
(1106) Dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance influences learning and memory in the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) by Umezawa M1, Ohta A, Tojo H, Yagi H, Hosokawa M, Takeda T.(PubMed)
(1107) High-linoleate and high-alpha-linolenate diets affect learning ability and natural behavior in SAMR1 mice by Umezawa M1, Kogishi K, Tojo H, Yoshimura S, Seriu N, Ohta A, Takeda T, Hosokawa M.(PubMed)
(1108) Evolution of exchangeable copper and relative exchangeable copper through the course of Wilson's disease in the Long Evans Cinnamon rat by Schmitt F1, Podevin G2, Poupon J3, Roux J4, Legras P4, Trocello JM5, Woimant F5, Laprévote O6, Nguyen TH7, El Balkhi S8.(PubMed)
(1109) Up-regulation of neurotrophic factors by cinnamon and its metabolite sodium benzoate: therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders by Jana A1, Modi KK, Roy A, Anderson JA, van Breemen RB, Pahan K.(PubMed)
(1110) Ethnomedicine of menstruation in rural Dominica, West Indies by Flores KE1, Quinlan MB2.(PubMed)
(1111) Assessing the antibiotic potential of essential oils against Haemophilus ducreyi by Lindeman Z, Waggoner M, Batdorff A, Humphreys TL1.(PubMed)
(1112) Regular ingestion of cinnamomi cortex pulveratus offers gastroprotective activity in mice by Tankam JM1, Sawada Y, Ito M.(PubMed)
(1113) The anti-oxidant effects of ginger and cinnamon on spermatogenesis dys-function of diabetes rats by Khaki A1, Khaki AA1, Hajhosseini L2, Golzar FS1, Ainehchi N1.(PubMed)
(1114) Effects of the polyphenol content on the anti-diabetic activity of Cinnamomum zeylanicum extracts by IM K1, Issac A, NM J, Ninan E, Maliakel B, Kuttan R.(PubMed)
(1115) Redox regulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 activity in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats during spontaneous hepatitis by Karmahapatra SK1, Saha T, Adhikari S, Woodrick J, Roy R.(PubMed)
(1116) Gastroprotective, cytoprotective and antioxidant effects of Oleum cinnamomi on ethanol induced damage by Ozbayer C1, Kurt H, Ozdemir Z, Tuncel T, Moheb Saadat S, Burukoglu D, Senturk H, Degirmenci I, Gunes HV.(PubMed)
(1117) Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of biocompatible cinnamaldehyde functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CPGF Nps) for hyperthermia and drug delivery applications in breast cancer by Wani KD1, Kadu BS2, Mansara P1, Gupta P3, Deore AV4, Chikate RC2, Poddar P3, Dhole SD4, Kaul-Ghanekar R1.(PubMed)
(1118) Novel angiogenesis inhibitory activity in cinnamon extract blocks VEGFR2 kinase and downstream signaling by Lu J1, Zhang K, Nam S, Anderson RA, Jove R, Wen W.(PubMed)
(1119) Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of cinnamic acid derivatives by Sova M1.(PubMed)
(1120) Antimicrobial and demelanizing activity of Ganoderma lucidum extract, p-hydroxybenzoic and cinnamic acids and their synthetic acetylated glucuronide methyl esters by Heleno SA1, Ferreira IC, Esteves AP, Ćirić A, Glamočlija J, Martins A, Soković M, Queiroz MJ.(PubMed)
(1121) Rou Gui or Gui Zhi(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1122) Interaction of cinnamaldehyde and epicatechin with tau: implications of beneficial effects in modulating Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis by George RC1, Lew J, Graves DJ.(PubMed)
(1123) Neuroprotection by spice-derived nutraceuticals: you are what you eat by Kannappan R1, Gupta SC, Kim JH, Reuter S, Aggarwal BB.(PubMed)
(1124) Inhibition of neuroinflammation by cinnamon and its main components by Ho SC1, Chang KS, Chang PW.(PubMed)
(1125) Attenuating effect of standardized lyophilized Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark extract against streptozotocin-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's type by Malik J, Munjal K, Deshmukh R.(PubMed)
(1126) Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models by Frydman-Marom A1, Levin A, Farfara D, Benromano T, Scherzer-Attali R, Peled S, Vassar R, Segal D, Gazit E, Frenkel D, Ovadia M.(PubMed)
(1127) Simple in vitro assays to identify amyloid-beta aggregation blockers for Alzheimer's disease therapy by Guo JP1, Yu S, McGeer PL.(PubMed)
(1128) [Antioxidants and oxidative stress].[Article in Norwegian] by Blomhoff R1.(PubMed)
(1129) Cinnamon: a multifaceted medicinal plant by Rao PV1, Gan SH2.(PubMed)
(1130) Cinnamon: potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes by Qin B1, Panickar KS, Anderson RA.(PubMed)
(1131) Cinnamon extract inhibits tau aggregation associated with Alzheimer's disease in vitro. by Peterson DW1, George RC, Scaramozzino F, LaPointe NE, Anderson RA, Graves DJ, Lew J.(PubMed)
(1132) Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models by Frydman-Marom A1, Levin A, Farfara D, Benromano T, Scherzer-Attali R, Peled S, Vassar R, Segal D, Gazit E, Frenkel D, Ovadia M.(PubMed)
(1133) Cinnamon counteracts the negative effects of a high fat/high fructose diet on behavior, brain insulin signaling and Alzheimer-associated changes by Anderson RA1, Qin B2, Canini F3, Poulet L4, Roussel AM5.(PubMed)
(1134) Alzheimer's disease drug discovery from herbs: neuroprotectivity from beta-amyloid (1-42) insult by Kim DS1, Kim JY, Han YS.(PubMed)
(1135) Cinnamon treatment upregulates neuroprotective proteins Parkin and DJ-1 and protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by Khasnavis S1, Pahan K.(PubMed)
(1136) Cinnamon in a mouse model of PD: Khasnavis S, Pahan K. Cinnamon protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 2014;9:569-581. by Fleming SM1, Espay AJ.(PubMed)
(1137) Differential inhibition of α-synuclein oligomeric and fibrillar assembly in parkinson's disease model by cinnamonextract by Shaltiel-Karyo R1, Davidi D, Frenkel-Pinter M, Ovadia M, Segal D, Gazit E.(PubMed)
(1138) Cinnamon polyphenols attenuate the hydrogen peroxide-induced down regulation of S100β secretion by regulating sirtuin 1 in C6 rat glioma cells by Qin B1, Panickar KS2, Anderson RA3.(PubMed)
(1139) Cinnamon polyphenols regulate S100β, sirtuins, and neuroactive proteins in rat C6 glioma cells by Qin B1, Panickar KS2, Anderson RA3.(PubMed)
(1140) Inhibition of neuroinflammation by cinnamon and its main components by Ho SC1, Chang KS, Chang PW.(PubMed)
(1141) Extract prepared from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia Blume prevents glutamate-induced neuronal death in cultured cerebellar granule cells by Shimada Y1, Goto H, Kogure T, Kohta K, Shintani T, Itoh T, Terasawa K.(PubMed)
(1142) Network-based biomarkers for cold coagulation blood stasis syndrome and the therapeutic effects of shaofu zhuyu decoction in rats. by Su S1, Duan J, Cui W, Shang E, Liu P, Bai G, Guo S, Qian D, Tang Y.(PubMed)
(1143) Blood, Blood Stasis, and Blood Path Disorders by Heiner Fruehauf(Classical Chinese medicine)
(1144) Aging & Blood Stasis: A New Tcm Approach to Geriatrics by Shuai Lao Ho Yu Hsueh
by Te-Hsin Yen, Te-Hsin Yen(Good reads)
(1145) A Look at Blood Stasis by Ronald Koh DVM, MS, CVA, CVCH, CVFT. FL USA(Chi Institute)
(1146) Constructing protein-protein interaction network of hypertension with blood stasis syndrome via digital gene expression sequencing and database mining. by Lian YH1, Fang MX1, Chen LG2.(PubMed)
(1147) Blood stasis syndrome of coronary heart disease: A perspective of modern medicine by Yu G1, Wang J.(PubMed)
(1148) Characterization of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide and its effect on human hepatoma cells by Zhang M1, Tang X, Wang F, Zhang Q, Zhang Z.(PubMed)
(1149) [Inhibition the growth of human leukemia cells by Lycium barbarum polysaccharide].[Article in Chinese] by Gan L1, Wang J, Zhang S.(PubMed)
(1150) Supercritical fluid extract of Lycium chinense Miller root inhibition of melanin production and its potential mechanisms of action by Huang HC, Huang WY, Tsai TC, Hsieh WY, Ko WP, Chang KJ, Chang TM1.(PubMed)
(1151) Three New Dimers and Two Monomers of Phenolic Amides from the Fruits of Lycium barbarum and Their Antioxidant Activities by Gao K1, Ma D, Cheng Y, Tian X, Lu Y, Du X, Tang H, Chen J.(PubMed)
(1152) Anti-inflammatory effect of Lycium Fruit water extract in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells by Oh YC1, Cho WK, Im GY, Jeong YH, Hwang YH, Liang C, Ma JY.(PubMed)
(1153) Reversal of the Caspase-Dependent Apoptotic Cytotoxicity Pathway by Taurine from Lycium barbarum (Goji Berry) in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells: Potential Benefit in Diabetic Retinopathy by Song MK1, Roufogalis BD, Huang TH.(PubMed)
(1134) Alzheimer's disease drug discovery from herbs: neuroprotectivity from beta-amyloid (1-42) insult by Kim DS1, Kim JY, Han YS.(PubMed)
(1135) Cinnamon treatment upregulates neuroprotective proteins Parkin and DJ-1 and protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by Khasnavis S1, Pahan K.(PubMed)
(1136) Cinnamon in a mouse model of PD: Khasnavis S, Pahan K. Cinnamon protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 2014;9:569-581 by Fleming SM1, Espay AJ.(PubMed)
(1137) Differential inhibition of α-synuclein oligomeric and fibrillar assembly in parkinson's disease model by cinnamon extract by Shaltiel-Karyo R1, Davidi D, Frenkel-Pinter M, Ovadia M, Segal D, Gazit E.(PubMed)
(1138) Cinnamon polyphenols attenuate the hydrogen peroxide-induced down regulation of S100β secretion by regulating sirtuin 1 in C6 rat glioma cells by Qin B1, Panickar KS2, Anderson RA3.(PubMed)
(1139) Cinnamon polyphenols regulate S100β, sirtuins, and neuroactive proteins in rat C6 glioma cells. by Qin B1, Panickar KS2, Anderson RA3.(PubMed)
(1140) Inhibition of neuroinflammation by cinnamon and its main components. by Ho SC1, Chang KS, Chang PW.(PubMed)
(1141) Extract prepared from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia Blume prevents glutamate-induced neuronal death in cultured cerebellar granule cells by Shimada Y1, Goto H, Kogure T, Kohta K, Shintani T, Itoh T, Terasawa K.(PubMed)
(1142) Network-based biomarkers for cold coagulation blood stasis syndrome and the therapeutic effects of shaofu zhuyu decoction in rats by Su S1, Duan J, Cui W, Shang E, Liu P, Bai G, Guo S, Qian D, Tang Y.(PubMed)
(1143) Blood, Blood Stasis, and Blood Path Disorders by Heiner Fruehauf(Classical Chinese medicine)
(1144) Aging & Blood Stasis: A New Tcm Approach to Geriatrics = Shuai Lao Ho Yu Hsueh
by Te-Hsin Yen, Te-Hsin Yen(Good reads)
(1145) A Look at Blood Stasis by Ronald Koh DVM, MS, CVA, CVCH, CVFT. FL USA(Chi Institute)
(1146) Constructing protein-protein interaction network of hypertension with blood stasis syndrome via digital gene expression sequencing and database mining by Lian YH1, Fang MX1, Chen LG2.(PubMed)
(1147) Blood stasis syndrome of coronary heart disease: A perspective of modern medicine. by Yu G1, Wang J.(PubMed)
(1148) Characterization of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide and its effect on human hepatoma cells. by Zhang M1, Tang X, Wang F, Zhang Q, Zhang Z.(PubMed)
(1149) [Inhibition the growth of human leukemia cells by Lycium barbarum polysaccharide].
[Article in Chinese] by Gan L1, Wang J, Zhang S.(PubMed)
(1150) Supercritical fluid extract of Lycium chinense Miller root inhibition of melanin production and its potential mechanisms of action. by Huang HC, Huang WY, Tsai TC, Hsieh WY, Ko WP, Chang KJ, Chang TM1.(PubMed)
(1151) Three New Dimers and Two Monomers of Phenolic Amides from the Fruits of Lycium barbarum and Their Antioxidant Activities. by Gao K1, Ma D, Cheng Y, Tian X, Lu Y, Du X, Tang H, Chen J.(PubMed)
(1152) Anti-inflammatory effect of Lycium Fruit water extract in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. by Oh YC1, Cho WK, Im GY, Jeong YH, Hwang YH, Liang C, Ma JY.(PubMed)
(1153) Reversal of the Caspase-Dependent Apoptotic Cytotoxicity Pathway by Taurine from Lycium barbarum (Goji Berry) in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells: Potential Benefit in Diabetic Retinopathy. by Song MK1, Roufogalis BD, Huang TH.(PubMed)(1154) Goji berry effects on macular characteristics and plasma antioxidant levels. by Bucheli P1, Vidal K, Shen L, Gu Z, Zhang C, Miller LE, Wang J.(PubMed)
(1155) Practical Application of Antidiabetic Efficacy of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharide in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes by Cai H, Liu F, Zuo P, Huang G, Song Z, Wang T, Lu H, Guo F, Han C, Sun G1.(PubMed)
(1156) wolfberry aging (PubMed)
(1157) An evidence-based update on the pharmacological activities and possible molecular targets of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides. by Cheng J1, Zhou ZW2, Sheng HP3, He LJ4, Fan XW5, He ZX6, Sun T7, Zhang X8, Zhao RJ9, Gu L10, Cao C2, Zhou SF11.(PubMed)
(1158) Anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of Lycium chinense leaf powder in obese rats. by Kang MH1, Park WJ, Choi MK.(PubMed)
(1159) Antagonistic effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides on the impaired reproductive system of male rats induced by local subchronic exposure to 60Co-γ irradiation by Luo Q1, Cui X, Yan J, Yang M, Liu J, Jiang Y, Li J, Zhou Y.(PubMed)
(1160) Lycium barbarum inhibits growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells by favorably altering estradiol metabolism. by Li G1, Sepkovic DW, Bradlow HL, Telang NT, Wong GY.(PubMed)
(1161) Qi zi(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1162) Neuroprotective effects of polysaccharides from wolfberry, the fruits of Lycium barbarum, against homocysteine-induced toxicity in rat cortical neurons. by Ho YS1, Yu MS, Yang XF, So KF, Yuen WH, Chang RC.(PubMed)
(1163) Polysaccharides from wolfberry antagonizes glutamate excitotoxicity in rat cortical neurons by Ho YS1, Yu MS, Yik SY, So KF, Yuen WH, Chang RC.(PubMed)
(1164) Characterizing the neuroprotective effects of alkaline extract of Lycium barbarum on beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity. by Ho YS1, Yu MS, Lai CS, So KF, Yuen WH, Chang RC.(PubMed)
(1165) Lycium barbarum polysaccharide prevents focal cerebral ischemic injury by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis in mice by Wang T1, Li Y2, Wang Y1, Zhou R1, Ma L3, Hao Y1, Jin S1, Du J1, Zhao C4, Sun T3, Yu J5.(PubMed)
(1166) Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway contributes to the protective effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides in the rodent retina after ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage by He M1, Pan H1, Chang RC2, So KF3, Brecha NC4, Pu M1.(PubMed)
(1167) Neuroprotective effects of Lycium chinense Miller against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by Im AR1, Kim YH, Uddin MR, Chae S, Lee HW, Kim YS, Lee MY.(PubMed)
(1168) A milk-based wolfberry preparation prevents prenatal stress-induced cognitive impairment of offspring rats, and inhibits oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro by Feng Z1, Jia H, Li X, Bai Z, Liu Z, Sun L, Zhu Z, Bucheli P, Ballèvre O, Wang J, Liu J.(PubMed)
(1169) Neuroprotective effects of a traditional herbal prescription on transient cerebral global ischemia in gerbils by Cai M1, Shin BY, Kim DH, Kim JM, Park SJ, Park CS, Won do H, Hong ND, Kang DH, Yutaka Y, Ryu JH.(PubMed)
(1170) Lycium barbarum polysaccharides prevent memory and neurogenesis impairments in scopolamine-treated rats by Chen W1, Cheng X2, Chen J3, Yi X2, Nie D4, Sun X5, Qin J2, Tian M2, Jin G2, Zhang X2.(PubMed)
(1171) The effects of Gouqi extracts on Morris maze learning in the APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by Zhang Q1, DU X, Xu Y, Dang L, Xiang L, Zhang J.(PubMed)
(1172) Neuroprotective Effect of Lucium chinense Fruit on Trimethyltin-Induced Learning and Memory Deficits in the Rats by Park HJ1, Shim HS, Choi WK, Kim KS, Bae H, Shim I.(PubMed)
(1173) [Blood lipid-regulation of stilbene glycoside from polygonum multiflorum].[Article in Chinese] by Gao X1, Hu YJ, Fu LC.(PubMed)
(1174) Polygonum multiflorum extracts improve cognitive performance in senescence accelerated mice by Chan YC1, Wang MF, Chang HC.(PubMed)
(1175) In vivo hair growth-stimulating effect of medicinal plant extract on BALB/c nude mice by Begum S1, Gu LJ, Lee MR, Li Z, Li JJ, Hossain MJ, Wang YB, Sung CK.(PubMed)
(1176) [Impact of 2, 3-dihydrocyclopentacoumarins to growth of transgenic hairy roots of Polygonum multiflorum and accumulation of stilbene glucosides].[Article in Chinese] by Liu L1, Zhou L, Zhang M, Yu R.(PubMed)
(1177) [Treatment of chronic primary glomerulopathy patients of Shen deficiency and dampness heat syndrome by yishen qingli granule combined low-dose Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside tablet: a clinical efficacy observation].[Article in Chinese] by Sheng MX1, Sun W2, Xing CY3, Yuan FH4, Tang SF5, Xiong PH6, Ma JP7, Zhou D2, Gao K2, Jiang Y2, Chen JH2, Mao HJ3, Mou J4, Luo YZ5, Wei MG6, Liu CX7.(PubMed)
(1178) HE SHOU WU (Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1179) [Effect of compound Polygonum multiflorum extract on Alzheimer's disease].[Article in Chinese] by Chen L1, Huang J, Xue L.(PubMed)
(1180) Effect of polygonum multiflorum on the fluidity of the mitochondria membrane and activity of COX in the hippocampus of rats with Abeta 1-40-induced Alzheimer's disease. by Hou DR1, Wang Y, Xue L, Tian Y, Chen K, Song Z, Yang QD.(PubMed)
(1181) Changes in hippocampal synapses and learning-memory abilities in age-increasing rats and effects of tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside in aged rats by Wang R1, Tang Y, Feng B, Ye C, Fang L, Zhang L, Li L.(PubMed)
(1182) Protective effect of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb on amyloid beta-peptide 25-35 induced cognitive deficits in mice by Um MY1, Choi WH, Aan JY, Kim SR, Ha TY.(PubMed)
(1183) Neuroprotective effects of Polygonum multiflorum on nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration induced by paraquat and maneb in mice by Li X1, Matsumoto K, Murakami Y, Tezuka Y, Wu Y, Kadota S.(PubMed)
(1184) The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system as a preferential target of repeated exposures to combined paraquat and maneb: implications for Parkinson's disease by Thiruchelvam M1, Richfield EK, Baggs RB, Tank AW, Cory-Slechta DA(PubMed)
(1185) Environmental toxins and Parkinson's disease: what have we learned from pesticide-induced animal models? by Cicchetti F1, Drouin-Ouellet J, Gross RE.(PubMed)
(1186) Hexane extracts of Polygonum multiflorum improve tissue and functional outcome following focal cerebral ischemia in mice by Lee SV1, Choi KH1, Choi YW2, Hong JW1, Baek JU1, Choi BT1, Shin HK1.(PubMed)
(1187) Hexane extract from Polygonum multiflorum attenuates glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons by Jang JY1, Kim HN, Kim YR, Choi YW, Choi YH, Lee JH, Shin HK, Choi BT.(PubMed)
(1188) Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against MPP+-induced cytotoxicity by Sun FL1, Zhang L, Zhang RY, Li L.(PubMed)
(1189) Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside improves the learning and memory of amyloid-β(₁₋₄₂)-injected rats and may be connected to synaptic changes in the hippocampus by Zhou L1, Hou Y, Yang Q, Du X, Li M, Yuan M, Zhou Z.(PubMed)
(1190) Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside improves learning and (or) memory ability of aged rats and may be connected to the APP pathway by Hou Y1, Yang Q, Zhou L, Du X, Li M, Yuan M, Zhou Z, Li Z.(PubMed)
(1191) Beneficial effects of different Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. extracts on memory and hippocampus morphology by Chan YC1, Cheng FC, Wang MF.(PubMed)
(1192) Polygonum multiflorum extracts improve cognitive performance in senescence accelerated mice. by Chan YC1, Wang MF, Chang HC.(PubMed)
(1193) Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) for the therapy of liver disease by Flora K1, Hahn M, Rosen H, Benner K.(PubMed)
(1194) Milk thistle in liver diseases: past, present, future by Abenavoli L1, Capasso R, Milic N, Capasso F.(PubMed)
(1195) Silymarin inhibits cell cycle progression and mTOR activity in activated human T cells: therapeutic implications for autoimmune diseases. by Gharagozloo M1, Javid EN, Rezaei A, Mousavizadeh K.(PubMed)
(1196) Silibinin reverses drug resistance in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells by Sadava D1, Kane SE.(PubMed)
(1197) Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer. by Forghani P1, Khorramizadeh MR, Waller EK.(PubMed)
(1198) Silymarin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. by Fan L1, Ma Y1, Liu Y1, Zheng D2, Huang G3.(PubMed)
(1199) Immunosuppressive effect of silymarin on mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway: the impact on T cell proliferation and cytokine production by Gharagozloo M1, Jafari S, Esmaeil N, Javid EN, Bagherpour B, Rezaei A.(PubMed)
(1200) Analysis of silibinin in rat plasma and bile for hepatobiliary excretion and oral bioavailability application by Wu JW1, Lin LC, Hung SC, Chi CW, Tsai TH.(PubMed)
(1201) Possible involvement of nitric oxide in antidepressant-like effect of silymarin in male mice. by Khoshnoodi M1, Fakhraei N, Dehpour AR.(PubMed)
(1202) Effects and tolerance of silymarin (milk thistle) in chronic hepatitis C virus infection patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials by Yang Z1, Zhuang L2, Lu Y1, Xu Q1, Chen X1.(PubMed)
(1203) Effect of silymarin (milk thistle) on liver disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C unsuccessfully treated with interferon therapy: a randomized controlled trial by Fried MW1, Navarro VJ, Afdhal N, Belle SH, Wahed AS, Hawke RL, Doo E, Meyers CM, Reddy KR; Silymarin in NASH and C Hepatitis (SyNCH) Study Group.(PubMed)
(1204) Shui fei ji(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1205) The clinical utility of milk thistle (Silybum marianum) in cirrhosis of the liver by Boerth J1, Strong KM.(PubMed)
(1206) Immunosuppressive effect of silymarin on mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway: the impact on T cell proliferation and cytokine production by Gharagozloo M1, Jafari S, Esmaeil N, Javid EN, Bagherpour B, Rezaei A.(PubMed)
(1207) Systematic review of the efficacy of herbal galactogogues by Mortel M1, Mehta SD.(PubMed)
(1208) Effect of reinforcing kidney-essence, removing phlegm, and promoting mental therapy on treating Alzheimer'sdisease. by Liu P1, Kong M, Liu S, Chen G, Wang P.(PubMed)
(1209) Effects of Chinese medicine for tonifying the kidney and resolving phlegm and blood stasis in treating patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a randomized, double-blind and parallel-controlled trial by Miao YC1, Tian JZ, Shi J, Mao M.(PubMed)
(1210) Effects of acupuncture on Chinese medicine syndromes of vascular dementia. by Shi GX1, Liu CZ, Guan W, Wang ZK, Wang L, Xiao C, Li ZG, Li QQ, Wang LP.(PubMed)
(1211) Accuracy of brain amyloid detection in clinical practice using cerebrospinal fluid β-amyloid 42: a cross-validation study against amyloid positron emission tomography by Palmqvist S1, Zetterberg H2, Blennow K2, Vestberg S3, Andreasson U2, Brooks DJ4, Owenius R5, Hägerström D6, Wollmer P7, Minthon L8, Hansson O8.(PubMed)
(1212) Apolipoprotein E genotype and the diagnostic accuracy of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease by Lautner R1, Palmqvist S2, Mattsson N3, Andreasson U1, Wallin A1, Pålsson E1, Jakobsson J1, Herukka SK4, Owenius R5, Olsson B1, Hampel H6, Rujescu D7,Ewers M8, Landén M9, Minthon L2, Blennow K1, Zetterberg H10, Hansson O2; Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.(PubMed)
(1213) Immunity factors for two related tRNAGln targeting killer toxins distinguish cognate and non-cognate toxic subunits by Klassen R1, Kast A, Wünsche G, Paluszynski JP, Wemhoff S, Meinhardt, F. (PubMed)
(1214) Non structural protein of avian influenza A (H11N1) virus is a weaker suppressor of immune responses but capable of inducing apoptosis in host cells. by Mukherjee S1, Majumdar S, Vipat VC, Mishra AC, Chakrabarti AK.(PubMed)
(1215) The anorexia of aging in humans by Hays NP1, Roberts SB.(PubMed)
(1216) Silibinin: a novel inhibitor of Aβ aggregation by Yin F1, Liu J, Ji X, Wang Y, Zidichouski J, Zhang J.(PubMed)
(1217) Silibinin prevents amyloid beta peptide-induced memory impairment and oxidative stress in mice. by Lu P1, Mamiya T, Lu LL, Mouri A, Zou L, Nagai T, Hiramatsu M, Ikejima T, Nabeshima T.(PubMed)
(1218) Silymarin attenuated the amyloid β plaque burden and improved behavioral abnormalities in an Alzheimer'sdisease mouse model by Murata N1, Murakami K, Ozawa Y, Kinoshita N, Irie K, Shirasawa T, Shimizu T.(PubMed)
(1219) Is lithium a neuroprotective agent? by Vo TM1, Perry P, Ellerby M, Bohnert K.(PubMed)
(1220) Silymarin extends lifespan and reduces proteotoxicity in C. elegans Alzheimer's model by Kumar J, Park KC, Awasthi A, Prasad B1.(PubMed)
(1221) Silymarin effect on amyloid-β plaque accumulation and gene expression of APP in an Alzheimer's disease rat model by Yaghmaei P1, Azarfar K, Dezfulian M, Ebrahim-Habibi A.(PubMed)
(1222) Silymarin attenuated the amyloid β plaque burden and improved behavioral abnormalities in an Alzheimer'sdisease mouse model by Murata N1, Murakami K, Ozawa Y, Kinoshita N, Irie K, Shirasawa T, Shimizu T.(PubMed)
(1223) Silibinin attenuates amyloid beta(25-35) peptide-induced memory impairments: implication of inducible nitric-oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice by Lu P1, Mamiya T, Lu LL, Mouri A, Niwa M, Hiramatsu M, Zou LB, Nagai T, Ikejima T, Nabeshima T.(PubMed)
(1224) Silibinin prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease via mitochondrial stabilization by Lee Y1, Park HR, Chun HJ, Lee J.(PubMed)
(1225) Silibinin attenuates MPP⁺-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra in vivo by Jung UJ1, Jeon MT, Choi MS, Kim SR.(PubMed)
(1226) Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models by Frydman-Marom A1, Levin A, Farfara D, Benromano T, Scherzer-Attali R, Peled S, Vassar R, Segal D, Gazit E, Frenkel D, Ovadia M.(PubMed)
(1227) Preventive effect of silymarin in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion-induced brain injury in rats possibly through impairing NF-κB and STAT-1 activation. by Hou YC1, Liou KT, Chern CM, Wang YH, Liao JF, Chang S, Chou YH, Shen YC.(PubMed)
(1228) Silibinin attenuates cognitive deficits and decreases of dopamine and serotonin induced by repeated methamphetamine treatment by Lu P1, Mamiya T, Lu L, Mouri A, Niwa M, Kim HC, Zou LB, Nagai T, Yamada K, Ikejima T, Nabeshima T.(PubMed)
(1229) Silibinin prevents amyloid beta peptide-induced memory impairment and oxidative stress in mice. by Lu P1, Mamiya T, Lu LL, Mouri A, Zou L, Nagai T, Hiramatsu M, Ikejima T, Nabeshima T.(PubMed)
(1230) Effect of silymarin on biochemical parameters of oxidative stress in aged and young rat brain. by Galhardi F1, Mesquita K, Monserrat JM, Barros DM.(PubMed)
(1231)
(1232) Benefit of supplements in functional dyspepsia after treatment of Helicobacter pylori. by Pellicano R1, Ribaldone DG, Saracco GM, Leone N, De Angelis C, Arrigoni A, Morello E, Sapone N, Cisarò F, Astegiano M.(PubMed)
(1233) Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay. by Lixandru BE1, Drăcea NO, Dragomirescu CC, Drăgulescu EC, Coldea IL, Anton L, Dobre E, Rovinaru C, Codiţă I.(PubMed)
(1234) Antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects of methanolic extract and volatile oil of fennel seeds (Foeniculum vulgare).by Mohamad RH1, El-Bastawesy AM, Abdel-Monem MG, Noor AM, Al-Mehdar HA, Sharawy SM, El-Merzabani MM.(PubMed)
(1235) Assessment of free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) seed extracts. by Goswami N1, Chatterjee S1.(PubMed)
(1236) Medicinal properties of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. in traditional Iranian medicine and modern phytotherapy. by Rahimi R1, Ardekani MR.(PubMed)
(1237) Potent inhibitory effect of Foeniculum vulgare Miller extract on osteoclast differentiation and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. by Kim TH1, Kim HJ, Lee SH, Kim SY.(PubMed)
(1238) Effects of Foeniculum vulgare ethanol extract on osteogenesis in human mecenchymal stem cells by Mahmoudi Z1, Soleimani M2, Saidi A1, Khamisipour G3, Azizsoltani A4.(PubMed)
(1239) [Antioxidant effects of the Uygur herb, Foeniculum Vulgare Mill, in a rat model of hepatic fibrosis].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang ZG1, Lu XB, Xiao L, Tang L, Zhang LJ, Zhang T, Zhan XY, Ma XM, Zhang YX.(PubMed)
(1240) Anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of selected Pakistani medicinal plants in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells by Zaidi SF1, Muhammad JS, Shahryar S, Usmanghani K, Gilani AH, Jafri W, Sugiyama T.(PubMed)
(1241) Randomized clinical trial of a phytotherapic compound containing Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare, Sambucus nigra, and Cassia augustifolia for chronic constipation. by Picon PD1, Picon RV, Costa AF, Sander GB, Amaral KM, Aboy AL, Henriques AT.(PubMed)
(1242) Fennel and anise as estrogenic agents by Albert-Puleo M.(PubMed)
(1243) The effect of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) gel 3% in decreasing hair thickness in idiopathic mild to moderate hirsutism, A randomized placebo controlled clinical trial by Akha O1, Rabiei K2, Kashi Z1, Bahar A1, Zaeif-Khorasani E1, Kosaryan M3, Saeedi M4, Ebrahimzadeh MA5, Emadian O6.(PubMed)
(1244)
(1245) Antihirsutism activity of Fennel (fruits of Foeniculum vulgare) extract. A double-blind placebo controlled study. by Javidnia K1, Dastgheib L, Mohammadi Samani S, Nasiri A.(PubMed)(1246) Cholinergic basis of memory-strengthening effect of Foeniculum vulgare Linn. by Joshi H1, Parle M(PubMed)
(1247) Suppression of the nuclear factor-kappaB activation pathway by spice-derived phytochemicals: reasoning for seasoning by Aggarwal BB1, Shishodia S.(PubMed)
(1248) Introduction to NF-B: players, pathways, perspectives by T D Gilmore1(Oncogene)
(1249) The NF-κB regulatory network by Allan R. Brasier(Springer link)
(1250) The Rel/NF-kappaB signal transduction pathway: introduction. by Gilmore TD1.(PubMed)
(1251) Integrating cell-signalling pathways with NF-κB and IKK function by Neil D. Perkins(Nature view)
(1252) Early behavioural changes in familial Alzheimer's disease in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network by Ringman JM1, Liang LJ2, Zhou Y3, Vangala S2, Teng E4, Kremen S3, Wharton D3, Goate A5, Marcus DS6, Farlow M7, Ghetti B8, McDade E9, Masters CL10,Mayeux RP11, Rossor M12, Salloway S13, Schofield PR14, Cummings JL15, Buckles V6, Bateman R6, Morris JC6; Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.(PubMed)
(1253) The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia: a 3-year longitudinal study. by Brodaty H1, Connors MH2, Xu J2, Woodward M3, Ames D4; PRIME study group.(PubMed)
(1254) Neuropsychiatric symptoms, APOE ε4, and the risk of incident dementia: a population-based study. by Pink A1, Stokin GB1, Bartley MM1, Roberts RO1, Sochor O1, Machulda MM1, Krell-Roesch J1, Knopman DS1, Acosta JI1, Christianson TJ1, Pankratz VS1,Mielke MM1, Petersen RC1, Geda YE2.(PubMed)
(1255) Evaluation of anxiolytic activity of the essential oil of the aerial part of Foeniculum vulgare Miller in mice by Mesfin M, Asres K, Shibeshi W1.(PubMed)
(1256) Foeniculum vulgare Mill: a review of its botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, contemporary application, and toxicology by Badgujar SB1, Patel VV1, Bandivdekar AH1.(PubMed)
(1257) Medicinal properties of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. in traditional Iranian medicine and modern phytotherapy by Rahimi R1, Ardekani MR.(PubMed)
(1258) Da suan(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1259) Antimicrobial properties of allicin from garlic. by Ankri S1, Mirelman D.(PubMed)
(1260) Antimicrobial properties of Allium sativum (garlic). by Harris JC1, Cottrell SL, Plummer S, Lloyd D.(PubMed)
(1261) Anti-wrinkle and anti-inflammatory effects of active garlic components and the inhibition of MMPs via NF-κB signaling by Kim SR1, Jung YR, An HJ, Kim DH, Jang EJ, Choi YJ, Moon KM, Park MH, Park CH, Chung KW, Bae HR, Choi YW, Kim ND, Chung HY.(PubMed)
(1262) Anti-ageing effect of aged garlic extract in the inbred brain atrophy mouse model. by Moriguchi T1, Saito H, Nishiyama N.(PubMed)
(1263) Systemic approaches identify a garlic-derived chemical, Z-ajoene, as a glioblastoma multiforme cancer stem cell-specific targeting agent. BY Jung Y1, Park H1, Zhao HY1, Jeon R1, Ryu JH1, Kim WY1.(PubMed))
(1264) N-benzyl-N-methyldecan-1-amine, a phenylamine derivative isolated from garlic cloves, induces G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in U937 human leukemia cells by Jeong JW1, Park S2, Park C3, Chang YC4, Moon DO5, Kim SO6, Kim GY7, Cha HJ8, Kim HS9, Choi YW2, Kim WJ10, Yoo YH11, Choi YH12.(PubMed)
(1265) Diallyl trisulfide-induced apoptosis of bladder cancer cells is caspase-dependent and regulated by PI3K/Akt and JNK pathways. by Shin DY1, Kim GY2, Hwang HJ3, Kim WJ4, Choi YH5.(PubMed)
(1266) Renoprotective effect of aged garlic extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Shiju TM1, Rajesh NG, Viswanathan P.(PubMed)
(1267) Aqueous extract of Allium sativum L bulbs offer nephroprotection by attenuating vascular endothelial growth factor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 expression in diabetic rats by Shiju TM1, Rajkumar R, Rajesh NG, Viswanathan P.(PubMed)
(1268) Garlic (Allium sativum L.): adverse effects and drug interactions in humans. by Borrelli F1, Capasso R, Izzo AA.(PubMed)
(1269) Inhibitory effect of sulfur-containing compounds in Scorodocarpus borneensis Becc. on the aggregation of rabbit platelets. by Lim H1, Kubota K, Kobayashi A, Seki T, Ariga T.(PubMed)
(1270) Matthew Budoff, MD: the cardiovascular effects of garlic supplementation. by Budoff M, Benson D.(PubMed)
(1271) Suppression of LDL oxidation by garlic compounds is a possible mechanism of cardiovascular health benefit. by Lau BH1.(PubMed)
(1272) Nutritional recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention. by Eilat-Adar S1, Sinai T, Yosefy C, Henkin Y.(PubMed)
(1273) Effects of aged garlic extract on left ventricular diastolic function and fibrosis in a rat hypertension model. by Hara Y1, Noda A, Miyata S, Minoshima M, Sugiura M, Kojima J, Otake M, Furukawa M, Cheng XW, Nagata K, Murohara T.(PubMed)
(1274) Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among hypertensive patients in Palestine. by Ali-Shtayeh MS1, Jamous RM, Jamous RM, Salameh NM.(PubMed)
(1275) The effects of black garlic (Allium satvium) extracts on lipid metabolism in rats fed a high fat diet by Ha AW1, Ying T1, Kim WK1.(PubMed)
(1276) Effects of garlic oil on interleukin-6 mediated cardiac hypertrophy in hypercholesterol-fed hamsters. by Hsieh YL1, Pai P, Ho TJ, Chung LC, Cheng YC, Wu CH, Fan MJ, Day CH, Shen CY, Huang CY.(PubMed)
(1277) Garlic oil attenuates the cardiac apoptosis in hamster-fed with hypercholesterol diet. by Cheng YC1, Chang MH, Tsai CC, Chen TS, Fan CC, Lin CC, Lai CH, Tsai FJ, Lin JA, Huang CY.(PubMed)
(1278) Immunity: plants as effective mediators. by Sultan MT1, Butt MS, Qayyum MM, Suleria HA.(PubMed)
(1279) Effect of ginger- and garlic-supplemented diet on growth performance, some hematological parameters and immune responses in juvenile Huso huso.by Kanani HG, Nobahar Z, Kakoolaki S, Jafarian H.(PubMed)
(1280) Improved resistance to Eimeria acervulina infection in chickens due to dietary supplementation with garlic metabolites. by Kim DK1, Lillehoj HS, Lee SH, Lillehoj EP, Bravo D.(PubMed)
(1281) [Mechanism of cooked blanched garlic leaves against platelet aggregation].[Article in Chinese] by Wang XH1, Di YH2.(PubMed)
(1282) [Does garlic influence rheologic properties and blood flow in progressive systemic sclerosis?].[Article in German] by Rapp A1, Grohmann G, Oelzner P, Uehleke B, Uhlemann C.(PubMed)
(1283) S-allyl cysteine attenuates oxidative stress associated cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in mouse model of streptozotocin-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's type. by Javed H1, Khan MM, Khan A, Vaibhav K, Ahmad A, Khuwaja G, Ahmed ME, Raza SS, Ashafaq M, Tabassum R, Siddiqui MS, El-Agnaf OM, Safhi MM, Islam F.(PubMed)
(1284) Oxidative insults to neurons and synapse are prevented by aged garlic extract and S-allyl-L-cysteine treatment in the neuronal culture and APP-Tg mouse model by Ray B1, Chauhan NB, Lahiri DK.(PubMed)
(1285) Neuroprotective effect of garlic compounds in amyloid-beta peptide-induced apoptosis in vitro by Peng Q1, Buz'Zard AR, Lau BH.(PubMed)
(1286) The "aged garlic extract:" (AGE) and one of its active ingredients S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) as potential preventive and therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) by Ray B1, Chauhan NB, Lahiri DK.(PubMed)
(1287) Neuroprotective effects of garlic a review by Mathew B1, Biju R.(PubMed)
(1288) Garlic extract exhibits antiamyloidogenic activity on amyloid-beta fibrillogenesis: relevance to Alzheimer's disease. by Gupta VB1, Indi SS, Rao KS.(PubMed)
(1289)Effect of aged garlic extract on APP processing and tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer's transgenic model Tg2576. by Chauhan NB1.(PubMed)
(1290) Biochemical stages of amyloid-β peptide aggregation and accumulation in the human brain and their association with symptomatic and pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease. by Rijal Upadhaya A1, Kosterin I, Kumar S, von Arnim CA, Yamaguchi H, Fändrich M, Walter J, Thal DR.(PubMed)
(1291) Simple in vitro assays to identify amyloid-beta aggregation blockers for Alzheimer's disease therapy. by Guo JP1, Yu S, McGeer PL.(PubMed)
(1292) Inhibition of amyloid-β aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. by Wang Q, Yu X, Li L, Zheng J1.(PubMed)
(1293) Ameliorating effects of aged garlic extracts against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment by Jeong JH, Jeong HR, Jo YN, Kim HJ, Shin JH, Heo HJ1.(PubMed)
(1294) The "aged garlic extract:" (AGE) and one of its active ingredients S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) as potential preventive and therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) by Ray B1, Chauhan NB, Lahiri DK.(PubMed)
(1295) Oxidative insults to neurons and synapse are prevented by aged garlic extract and S-allyl-L-cysteine treatment in the neuronal culture and APP-Tg mouse model by Ray B1, Chauhan NB, Lahiri DK.(PubMed)
(1296) Effect of aged garlic extract on APP processing and tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer's transgenic model Tg2576 by Chauhan NB1.(PubMed)
(1297) Aged garlic extract, garlic powder extract, S-allylcysteine, diallyl sulfide and diallyl disulfide do not interfere with the antibiotic activity of gentamicin. by Maldonado PD1, Chánez-Cárdenas ME, Pedraza-Chaverrí J.(PubMed)
(1298) Olfactory performance and resting state functional connectivity in non-demented drug naïve patients with Parkinson's disease by Sunwoo MK1, Cha J, Ham JH, Song SK, Hong JY, Lee JM, Sohn YH, Lee PH.(PubMed)
(1299) Olfactory performance acts as a cognitive reserve in non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease by Lee JE1, Cho KH1, Ham JH1, Song SK2, Sohn YH1, Lee PH3.(PubMed)
(1300) A population-based study on combined markers for early Parkinson's disease. by Tunc S1, Graf J, Tadic V, Brüggemann N, Schmidt A, Al-Khaled M, Wolff S, Vollstedt EJ, Lorwin A, Hampf J, Piskol L, Klein C, Hagenah J, Kasten M.(PubMed)
(1301) Evolution of prodromal clinical markers of Parkinson disease in a GBA mutation-positive cohort by Beavan M1, McNeill A1, Proukakis C1, Hughes DA2, Mehta A2, Schapira AH1.(PubMed)
(1302) Association of anosmia with autonomic failure in Parkinson disease by Goldstein DS1, Sewell L, Holmes C.(PubMed)
(1303) Association of anosmia with autonomic failure in Parkinson disease by Burke WJ.(PubMed)
(1304) Methionine sulfoxide reductase A and a dietary supplement S-methyl-L-cysteine prevent Parkinson's-like symptoms by Wassef R1, Haenold R, Hansel A, Brot N, Heinemann SH, Hoshi T.(PubMed)
(1305) A possible emerging role of phytochemicals in improving age-related neurological dysfunctions: a multiplicity of effects by Youdim KA1, Joseph JA.(PubMed)
(1306) Amelioration of early cognitive deficits by aged garlic extract in Alzheimer's transgenic mice. by Chauhan NB1, Sandoval J.(PubMed)
(1307) Ameliorating effects of aged garlic extracts against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment by Jeong JH, Jeong HR, Jo YN, Kim HJ, Shin JH, Heo HJ1.(PubMed)
(1308) S-allyl cysteine attenuates oxidative stress associated cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in mouse model of streptozotocin-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's type by Javed H1, Khan MM, Khan A, Vaibhav K, Ahmad A, Khuwaja G, Ahmed ME, Raza SS, Ashafaq M, Tabassum R, Siddiqui MS, El-Agnaf OM, Safhi MM, Islam F.(PubMed)
(1309) Learning and memory promoting effects of crude garlic extract by Mukherjee D1, Banerjee S1.(PubMed)
(1310) S-Allylcysteine prevents amyloid-beta peptide-induced oxidative stress in rat hippocampus and ameliorates learning deficits by Pérez-Severiano F1, Salvatierra-Sánchez R, Rodríguez-Pérez M, Cuevas-Martínez EY, Guevara J, Limón D, Maldonado PD, Medina-Campos ON, Pedraza-Chaverrí J, Santamaría A.(PubMed)
(1311) Qigong for Wellbeing in Dementia and Aging by Stephen Rath
(1312) Chinese Medical Psychiatry: A Textbook & Clinical Manual : Including ... By Bob Flaws, James Lake
(1313) Dong chong xia cao(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1314) Mycelial extract of Cordyceps ophioglossoides prevents neuronal cell death and ameliorates beta-amyloid peptide-induced memory deficits in rats by Jin DQ1, Park BC, Lee JS, Choi HD, Lee YS, Yang JH, Kim JA.(PubMed)
(1315) Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. alleviates diabetic retinopathy by preventing retinal inflammation and tight junction protein decrease by Yu Z1, Gong C1, Lu B1, Yang L1, Sheng Y2, Ji L1, Wang Z1.(PubMed)
(1316) Ethanol extract of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl ameliorates diabetic retinopathy and its mechanism. by Gong CY1, Yu ZY1, Lu B1, Yang L1, Sheng YC2, Fan YM1, Ji LL3, Wang ZT1.(PubMed)
(1317) [Studies on anti-hyperglycemic effect and its mechanism of Dendrobium candidum].[Article in Chinese] by Wu HS1, Xu JH, Chen LZ, Sun JJ.(PubMed)
(1318) [Studies on anti-hyperglycemic effect and its mechanism of Clinopodium chinense].[Article in Chinese] by Tian DN1, Wu FH, Ma SC, Li D, Dai Y.(PubMed)
(1319) Antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from Dendrobium species in southwestern China by Cui J1, Wang Y, Xing Y, Guo S, Xiao P, Wang M.(PubMed)
(1320) Antimicrobial activity and biodiversity of endophytic fungi in Dendrobium devonianum and Dendrobium thyrsiflorum from Vietnam by Xing YM1, Chen J, Cui JL, Chen XM, Guo SX.(PubMed)
(1321) [Experimental study on preclinical quality control, urgent poison and irritation of Dendrobium aurantiacum eye drops, a class I new drug against diabetic cataract].[Article in Chinese] by Yi YQ1, Yang QH, Su JF, Chen J, Qi H, Chen D, Wei XY.(PubMed)
(1322) [Observation on therapeutic effect of runmushu oral liquid in treating xerophthalmia in postmenopausal women].[Article in Chinese] by Wei D1, Li YH, Zhou WY.(PubMed)
(1323)Shi hu(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1324) Alkaloids enriched extract from Dendrobium nobile Lindl. attenuates tau protein hyperphosphorylation and apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide in rat brain by Yang S1, Gong Q1, Wu Q1, Li F1, Lu Y1, Shi J2.(PubMed)
(1325) Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. bark. attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal cell death through inhibition of oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells by Kwon SH1, Ma SX1, Hong SI1, Kim SY2, Lee SY1, Jang CG3.(PubMed)
(1326) Constituents and pharmacological effects of Eucommia and Siberian ginseng by Deyama T1, Nishibe S, Nakazawa Y.(PubMed)
(1327) Elucidation of anti-inflammatory potencies of Eucommia ulmoides bark and Plantago asiatica seeds by Kim BH1, Park KS, Chang IM.(PubMed)
(1328) Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. bark aqueous extract inhibits osteoarthritis in a rat model of osteoarthritis by Xie GP1, Jiang N2, Wang SN3, Qi RZ4, Wang L5, Zhao PR6, Liang L7, Yu B8.(PubMed)
(1329) Eucommia ulmoides Oliv.: ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology of an important traditional Chinese medicine by He X1, Wang J2, Li M3, Hao D1, Yang Y4, Zhang C1, He R1, Tao R5.(PubMed)
(1330) A clinical trial testing the safety and efficacy of a standardized Eucommia ulmoides Oliver bark extract to treat hypertension by Greenway F1, Liu Z, Yu Y, Gupta A.(PubMed)
(1331) Antihypertensive effect of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. extracts in spontaneously hypertensive rats by Luo LF1, Wu WH, Zhou YJ, Yan J, Yang GP, Ouyang DS.(PubMed)
(1332) Eucommia bark pain (PubMed)
(1333) Du Zhong(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(1334) Inhibitory Effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark on Scopolamine-Induced Learning and Memory Deficits in Mice. by Kwon SH1, Ma SX1, Joo HJ1, Lee SY1, Jang CG1.(PubMed)
(1335) Neuroprotective effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark on amyloid beta(25-35)-induced learning and memory impairments in mice by Kwon SH1, Lee HK, Kim JA, Hong SI, Kim SY, Jo TH, Park YI, Lee CK, Kim YB, Lee SY, Jang CG.(PubMed)
(1336) Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark. protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death in SH-SY5Y cells by Kwon SH1, Kim MJ, Ma SX, You IJ, Hwang JY, Oh JH, Kim SY, Kim HC, Lee SY, Jang CG.(PubMed)
(1337) Eucommia ulmoides Oliv.: ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology of an important traditional Chinese medicine by He X1, Wang J2, Li M3, Hao D1, Yang Y4, Zhang C1, He R1, Tao R5.(PubMed)
(1338) Protective effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. bark and leaf on amyloid β-induced cytotoxicity by Zhou Y1, Liang M, Li W, Li K, Li P, Hu Y, Yang Z.(PubMed)
(1339) Review of the botanical characteristics, phytochemistry, and pharmacology of Astragalus membranaceus (Huangqi) by Fu J1, Wang Z, Huang L, Zheng S, Wang D, Chen S, Zhang H, Yang S.(PubMed)
(1340) Phenotypic characterization of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts and their phylogeny based on the 16S rDNA sequences and RFLP of 16S rRNA gene by Gnat S1, Wójcik M, Wdowiak-Wróbel S, Kalita M, Ptaszyńska A, Małek W.(PubMed)
(1341) Supplementation with Astragalus polysaccharides alters Aeromonas-induced tissue-specific cellular immune response by Abuelsaad AS1.(PubMed)
(1342) Astragalus polysaccharide attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglial cells: regulation of protein kinase B and nuclear factor-κB signaling by Luo T1, Qin J, Liu M, Luo J, Ding F, Wang M, Zheng L.(PubMed)
(1343) Anti-inflammatory effects of Polygala tenuifolia root through inhibition of NF-κB activation in lipopolysaccharide-induced BV2 microglial cells by Cheong MH1, Lee SR, Yoo HS, Jeong JW, Kim GY, Kim WJ, Jung IC, Choi YH(PubMed)
(1344) Investigation of chemomarkers of astragali radix of different ages and geographical origin by NMR profiling by Zheng L1, Wang M2,3, Ibarra-Estrada E4, Wu C5, Wilson EG6, Verpoorte R7, Klinkhamer PG8, Choi YH9.(PubMed)
(1345) Astragalus and Paeoniae Radix Rubra extract (APE) inhibits hepatic stellate cell activation by modulating transforming growth factor-β/Smad pathway by Huang W1, Li L1, Tian X2, Yan J3, Yang X3, Wang X1, Liao G1, Qiu G4.(PubMed)
(1346) Polysaccharides from Angelica and Astragalus exert hepatoprotective effects against carbon-tetrachloride-induced intoxication in mice by Pu X1, Fan W, Yu S, Li Y, Ma X, Liu L, Ren J, Zhang W.(PubMed)
(1347) The critical role of Astragalus polysaccharides for the improvement of PPARα [ correction of PPRAα]-mediated lipotoxicity in diabetic cardiomyopathy by Chen W1, Xia Y, Zhao X, Wang H, Chen W, Yu M, Li Y, Ye H, Zhang Y.(PubMed)
(1348) Comparative evaluation of polysaccharides isolated from Astragalus, oyster mushroom, and yacon as inhibitors of α-glucosidase by Zhu ZY1, Zhang JY2, Chen LJ3, Liu XC2, Liu Y2, Wang WX2, Zhang YM4.(PubMed)
(1349) Comparative evaluation of polysaccharides isolated from Astragalus, oyster mushroom, and yacon as inhibitors of α-glucosidase by Zhu ZY1, Zhang JY2, Chen LJ3, Liu XC2, Liu Y2, Wang WX2, Zhang YM4.(PubMed)
(1350) Astragalus saponins downregulate vascular endothelial growth factor under cobalt chloride-stimulated hypoxia in colon cancer cells. by Law PC1, Auyeung KK, Chan LY, Ko JK.(PubMed)
(1351) Anticancer potential of rhamnocitrin 4'-β-D-galactopyranoside against N-diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in rats by Saleem S1, Shaharyar MA, Khusroo MJ, Ahmad P, Rahman RU, Ahmad K, Alam MJ, Al-Harbi NO, Iqbal M, Imam F.(PubMed)
(1352) Investigation of chemomarkers of astragali radix of different ages and geographical origin by NMR profiling by Zheng L1, Wang M2,3, Ibarra-Estrada E4, Wu C5, Wilson EG6, Verpoorte R7, Klinkhamer PG8, Choi YH9.(PubMed)
(1353) [Therapeutic effect of Astragalus and Angelica mixture on the renal function and TCM syndrome factors in treating stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease patients].[Article in Chinese] by Li S, Yin XX, Su T, Cao C, Li X, Rao XR, Li X.(PubMed)
(1354) Astragalus (a traditional Chinese medicine) for treating chronic kidney disease. by Zhang HW1, Lin ZX, Xu C, Leung C, Chan LS.(PubMed)
(1355) Anti-hypertensive effects of shichimotsukokato in 5/6 nephrectomized Wistar rats mediated by the DDAH-ADMA-NO pathway by Bai F1, Makino T, Ono T, Mizukami H.(PubMed)
(1356) Astragaloside IV improves metabolic syndrome and endothelium dysfunction in fructose-fed rats. by Zhang N1, Wang XH, Mao SL, Zhao F.(PubMed)
(1357) The influence of astragalus polysaccharide and β-elemene on LX-2 cell growth, apoptosis and activation by Zheng J, Ma LT, Ren QY, Li L, Zhang Y, Shi HJ, Liu Y, Li CH, Dou YQ, Li SD, Zhang H, Yang MH.(PubMed)
(1358) Semen Astragali Complanati: an ethnopharmacological, phytochemical and pharmacological review by Ng YF1, Tang PC2, Sham TT2, Lam WS3, Mok DK4, Chan SW5.(PubMed)
(1360) [Advances in pharmacological study of natural active polysaccharides in China].[Article in Chinese] by Han G1, Duan Y.(PubMed)
(1361) [A review of pharmacological study on Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge].[Article in Chinese] by Wu F1, Chen X.(PubMed)
(1362) [Memory-improving effect of aqueous extract of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge].[Article in Chinese] by Hong GX1, Qin WC, Huang LS.(PubMed)
(1363) Protective effect of extract of Astragalus on learning and memory impairments and neurons' apoptosis induced by glucocorticoids in 12-month-old male mice by Li WZ1, Li WP, Zhang W, Yin YY, Sun XX, Zhou SS, Xu XQ, Tao CR.(PubMed)
(1364) [Effect of improving memory and inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity by invigorating-qi and warming-yang recipe].[Article in Chinese] by Liu ZY1, Yang YG, Zheng B.(PubMed)
(1365) [Study on preventative and curative effects of astragaloside (AST) on mice memory impairment and expression of amyloid precursor protein and beta secretase mRNA induced by dexamethasone].[Article in Chinese] by Zhang W1, Li W, Li W, Sun X, Zhou S, Xu X.(PubMed)
(1366) [Effects of astragalosides on PC12 cells injury and APP expression induced by dexamethasone and Abeta(25-35)].[Article in Chinese] by Huang RR, Li WZ, Li WP.(PubMed)
(1367) Protective effects of astragalosides on dexamethasone and Aβ25-35 induced learning and memory impairments due to decrease amyloid precursor protein expression in 12-month male rats. by Li WZ1, Wu WY, Huang DK, Yin YY, Kan HW, Wang X, Yao YY, Li WP.(PubMed)
(1368) Protective effects of astragaloside IV against amyloid beta1-42 neurotoxicity by inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. by Sun Q1, Jia N1, Wang W1, Jin H1, Xu J1, Hu H1.(PubMed)
(1369)Astragaloside IV Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat by Anwen Shao1, Songxue Guo2, Sheng Tu3, Al-baadani Ammar1, Junjia Tang1, Yuan Hong1, Haijian Wu1, Jianmin Zhang1 (International journal medical science)
(1370) [Study on effect of astragali radix polysaccharides in improving learning and memory functions in aged rats and its mechanism].[Article in Chinese] by Yao H, Gu LJ, Guo JY(PubMed)
(1371) [The Chinese medicine nutrient diet intervention prevent against the neurologic damage induce by EMF irradiation in rat hippocampus].[Article in Chinese] by Gong QF1, Yang XS, Tu L, Zhang GB, Yu ZP.(PubMed)
(1372) Protective effects of astragalus extract against intermittent hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurons impairment in rats. by Zhang Q1, Gao WY, Zhang Y, Chen BY, Chen Z, Zhang WS, Man SL.(PubMed)
(1373) Protective effect of extract of Astragalus on learning and memory impairments and neurons' apoptosis induced by glucocorticoids in 12-month-old male mice by Li WZ1, Li WP, Zhang W, Yin YY, Sun XX, Zhou SS, Xu XQ, Tao CR.(PubMed)
(1374) Protective effects of astragaloside IV against amyloid beta1-42 neurotoxicity by inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by Sun Q1, Jia N1, Wang W1, Jin H1, Xu J1, Hu H1.(PubMed)
(1375)
(1376) Recent advances in herbal medicines treating Parkinson's disease. by Li XZ1, Zhang SN, Liu SM, Lu F.(PubMed)
(1377) Neuroprotective effects of Astragaloside IV in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated primary nigral cell culture. by Chan WS1, Durairajan SS, Lu JH, Wang Y, Xie LX, Kum WF, Koo I, Yung KK, Li M.(PubMed)
(1378) Astragaloside IV alleviates early brain injury following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats by Shao A1, Guo S2, Tu S3, Ammar AB1, Tang J1, Hong Y1, Wu H1, Zhang J1.(PubMed)
(1379) Amelioration of oxidative stress and protection against early brain injury by astaxanthin after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage. byZhang XS1, Zhang X, Zhou ML, Zhou XM, Li N, Li W, Cong ZX, Sun Q, Zhuang Z, Wang CX, Shi JX.(PubMed)
(1380) Ethanol extract of Astragali Radix and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix, Myelophil, exerts anti-amnesic effect in a mouse model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits. by Lee JS1, Kim HG1, Han JM1, Kim DW2, Yi MH2, Son SW3, Kim YA1, Lee JS4, Choi MK1, Son CG5.(PubMed)
(1381) Myelophil attenuates brain oxidative damage by modulating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in a chronic cold-stress mouse model by Kim HG1, Lee JS, Han JM, Lee JS, Choi MK, Son SW, Kim YK, Son CG.(PubMed)