Super Affiliates

Permanent Unwanted Tattoo Removal by Tattoo Expert

Permanent Unwanted Tattoo Removal by Tattoo Expert
Safely, Painlessly, Laserlessly and Naturally in Removing any Unwanted Tattoos in 2 to 8 Weeks, Guaranteed

Monday, 17 October 2016

Regular Walking, (The Easy Way for age 50 plus to Diseases Free of Age 100+) reduces risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD)

Kyle J. Norton(Scholar, Master of Nutrients), all right reserved.
Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it's news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada - Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.

Regular physical activity has long been found to associate to the prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic diseases but guide lines to support older adult in engagement in regular physical activity (PA) to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) are lacking.

According to joint study led by the University of Porto, in a prospective cohort analysis among 4207 US men and women of a mean age of 73 years(standard deviation=6) who were free of CVD at baseline in the Cardiovascular Health Study suggested, walking, reduces the incidence of CVD among older adults(1).

Dr. Mozaffarian D and colleagues at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston said, "light to moderate physical activities, particularly leisure-time activity and walking, (moderate leisure-time activity (approximately 600 kcal/week), walking distance (12 blocks per week), and pace (2 mph))are associated with significantly lower AF incidence in older adults"(2).

In the comparison of physical activity patterns and leisure time between patients with cardiovascular disease and individuals without a heart disease, suggested that low physical activity and use of long time relaxation are associated with CVD and Regular participation in physical activity such as walking 2 h per week and 2-4 h per week, are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease(3).

Further more, physical exercise, such as distance walked and walking were inversely associated with prevalent CVD in patients with type 1 diabetes(4) and walking at least 2 hours per week was associated with a reduction in the incidence of 34%–53% from cardiovascular disease among patients with type 2 diabetes(5)

Chinese Food Therapy
The Best Way to prevent, treat your disease, including Obesity
and restore your health naturally with Chinese diet

Ovarian Cysts And PCOS Elimination
Holistic System In Existence That Will Show You How To
Permanently Eliminate All Types of Ovarian Cysts Within 2 Months

Super foods Library, Eat Yourself Healthy With The Best of the Best Nature Has to Offer


References
(1) Physical Activity and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study by Soares-Miranda L1, Siscovick DS2, Psaty BM2, Longstreth WT Jr2, Mozaffarian D2.(PubMed)
(2) Physical activity and incidence of atrial fibrillation in older adults: the cardiovascular healthstudy by Mozaffarian D1, Furberg CD, Psaty BM, Siscovick D.(PubMed)
(3) Use of leisure time in cardiovascular patients in Gorgan (south east of Caspian Sea). by Marjani A1, Ramazani MA, Khori V, Jamshir M, Alizadeh F.(PubMed)
(4) Association of physical activity with all-cause mortality and incident and prevalent cardiovascular disease among patients with type 1 diabetes: the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study by Tielemans SM1, Soedamah-Muthu SS, De Neve M, Toeller M, Chaturvedi N, Fuller JH, Stamatakis E.(PubMed)
(5) Low cardiorespiratory fitness and physical inactivity as predictors of mortality in men with type 2 diabetes by Wei M1, Gibbons LW, Kampert JB, Nichaman MZ, Blair SN.(PubMed)